Table of Contents

Welcome
Project Update
November Symposium
Art Show Review
March Artwork
More March Artwork
Statistics
Cancer Myths
Health Tools
Frequently
Asked Questions
Support Groups
Feedback



Dr. B. Thomas
School of Nursing
Dr. Anne Forrest
Women's Studies
Prof. Susan Gold/Smith
Visual Arts


By taking an active role in screening for breast cancer you can increase YOUR chances for a healthier future. There are three basic screening methods to monitor your breast health: A breast self examination (BSE) is important to do monthly because it lets you know what is normal for you, and detects abnormalities early. It has three components: (1) manual examination in the shower, (2) visual examination in the mirror, and (3) manual examination while lying flat.

The clinical breast examination (CBE) is when a health care provider such as a nurse or physician manually and visually examines your breasts and lymph nodes to detect any abnormalities. It should be performed yearly, or as soon as you detect a lump during a BSE.

A mammogram is an imaging technique, or X- ray, used for diagnostic purposes. It is the single best method available for detection of breast cancer, and should be used in conjunction with the BSE and CBE. In Ontario, mammograms are recommended for women over the age of 50 years and for special populations of women (www.cancercare.on.ca/obsp/english.htm).


RISK FACTORS OF BREAST CANCER
There are a number of factors that may increase a woman’s chance of developing breast cancer:
    • Highest rates of breast cancer occur in North America and Northern Europe
    • Risk increases with age
    • Family history of breast cancer
    • Childbirth after the age of 30
    • Childlessness
    • Menstruation beginning before age 13, and menopause occurring after age 55
    • Obesity

EARLY WARNING SIGNS OF BREAST CANCER
Early warning signs of breast cancer that should be immediately reported to a health care provider include:
    • Lumps in the breast or armpit
    • Thickening in the breast
    • Dimpling of the breast
    • Nipple retraction
    • Discharge from the nipple

Comments about our web pages? Send e-mail to: Web Administrator, University of Windsor. Created: 09/11/2000. © 2001, University of Windsor. Although care has been taken in preparing the information in this site the University of Windsor cannot guarantee its accuracy.