Course Descriptions - Biological Sciences
College of Engineering and Science
Biological Sciences

4.3.2 COURSE DESCRIPTIONS - BIOLOGY
Students must normally have completed the prerequisites indicated, but under special circumstances may be permitted to take a particular course with the consent of the instructor.
Not all courses listed will necessarily be taught each year.
Courses with Limited Enrolment: Students who require these courses as part of their program will be given preference.

55-100. Biology of Organisms
Genetics, energetics, and the diversity of life. Properties of living organisms from the level of the cell through tissues, organs and organ systems, to the functioning, integrated organism. Intended primarily for non-majors. (Antirequisite: both 55-102 and 55-103.) (If student does not have credit for OAC Biology, then 55-100 and 55-101 with a combined grade point average of at least 8.0 will serve as prerequisites for 55-140. A student may receive credit for either both 55-100 and 55-101, or both 55-140 and 55-141, but not for all four courses.) (Biology Majors note that 55-140 and 55-141 are required courses.) (2 lecture hours a week.)

55-101. Organisms and the Environment
Organisms interacting with other organisms and with their physical environment. Ecological impacts of human activity. Intended primarily for non-majors. (Antirequisite: both 55-102 and 55-103.) (If a student does not have credit for OAC Biology, then 55-100 and 55-101 with a combined grade point average of at least 8.0 will serve as prerequisites for 55-140.) (A student may receive credit for either both 55-100 and 55-101, or both 55-140 and 55-141, but not for all four courses.) (Biology Majors note that 55-140 and 55-141 are required courses.) (2 lecture hours a week.)

55-102. Concepts of Biology I
Introduction to the major concepts of biology with emphasis on the chemical basis of life, the biology of cells, and the physiology of human systems as biological ideas of importance to human problems. A Distance Education course intended primarily for non-majors. (Antirequisite: both 55-100 and 55-101.) (If student does not have credit for OAC Biology, then 55-102 and 55-103 with a combined grade point average of at least 8.0 will serve as prerequisites for 55-140. A student may receive credit for either both 55-102 and 55-103, or both 55-140 and 55-141, but not for all four courses.) (Biology Majors note that 55-140 and 55-141 are required courses.) (2 lecture hours or equivalent a week.)

55-103. Concepts of Biology II
Introduction to major concepts of biology with emphasis on human reproduction, coordination of human systems by both hormones and nerves, human genetics, and ecology as biological ideas of importance to human problems. A Distance Education course intended primarily for non-majors. (Antirequisite: both 55-100 and 55-101.) (If a student does not have credit for OAC Biology, then 55-102 and 55-103 with a combined grade point average of at least 8.0 will serve as prerequisites for 55-140). (A student may receive credit for either both 55-102 and 55-103, or both 55-140 and 55-141, but not for all four courses.) (Biology Majors note that 55-140 and 55-141 are required courses.)(2 lecture hours or equivalent a week.)

55-140. Biological Diversity
Principles governing living systems; the origins and diversity of life; evolution, reproduction, and heredity; the structure and function of viruses through plants and animals; basic principles of ecology. (OAC Biology or 55-100 and 55-101 are strongly recommended; corequisite: Chemistry 59-140 or equivalent.) (3 lecture, 3 laboratory hours a week.)

55-141. Cell Biology
Examination of the principles governing living systems, with emphasis on the molecular and cellular basis of life, molecular genetics, energetics, differentiation, and development. (Prerequisite: 55-140; corequisite: Chemistry 59-141 or equivalent.) (3 lecture, 3 laboratory hours a week.)

55-201. Applied Ecology
The effects of humans and technology on the environment. Topics include cause-effect linkages, energy, chemicals in the environment, preservation of biodiversity. (3 lecture hours a week.)

55-202. Human Anatomy
Systemic analysis of the structure of the human body, including gross and microscopic morphology. Laboratory sessions focus on gross and microscopic morphology. (3 lecture, 2 laboratory hours a week.) (Limited enrolment.)

55-203. General Physiology
Cell and organismic physiology with emphasis on basic life processes in both plants and animals, including nutrition, metabolism, energy transformations, transport mechanisms, signal transduction, and other general functions. (Antirequisite: 55-213; prerequisite: 55-141; corequisite: Chemistry 59-261.) (3 lecture, 3 laboratory hours or equivalent a week.) (A Distance Education course restricted to graduates of programs in Medical Technology from a College of Applied Arts and Technology with more than 100 hours of certified laboratory experience; or by consent of the instructor.)

55-204. Human Physiology I
Introduction to human physiology: a systems approach. Topics include homeostasis and feedback control, enzymes and energy, membrane transport, metabolism, and the nervous, skeletal muscle, and cardiovascular systems. (Prerequisites: 55-100 and 55-101, or OAC Biology.) (3 lecture hours a week.)

55-205. Human Physiology II
Introduction to human physiology: a systems approach. Topics include respiratory, endocrine, digestive and renal systems, and control of metabolism. (Prerequisite: 55-204 or consent of instructor.) (3 lecture hours a week.)

55-206. Introduction to Microbiology
Introduction to the major groups of microorganisms, emphasizing structure, physiology, multiplication, and control. The major groups of pathogenic bacteria are discussed. A Distance Education course. (Antirequisites: 55-237, 55-238; prerequisites: OAC Biology or 55-100 and 55-101 with a combined grade point average of at least 8.0, or 55-140 and 55-141; corequisite: Chemistry 59-140.) (3 lecture hours a week.)

55-208. Plants and Human Affairs
The biosphere as we know it is ultimately the product of plant activity. This course deals with the interactions between humans and the plant world. It discusses how these interactions originate, and how they relate to the well-being and survival of human life. (Prerequisite: OAC Biology or the equivalent.) (2 lecture hours, 1 discussion/seminar hour a week.)

55-210. Ecology
Introduction to the fundamental concepts of ecology including factors affecting species distribution, reproductive strategies, population growth and regulation, species interactions, and community level organization and energetics. (Prerequisites: 55-140 and 55-141.) (3 lecture, 2 laboratory/discussion hours a week.) (Limited enrolment.)

55-211. Genetics
An introduction to the principles and mechanisms of heredity. This course has three parts: Mendelian genetics, molecular genetics, and population genetics. It covers 1- and 2-locus systems, gene interactions, gene mapping, sex determination and sex linkage, cytogenetics, molecular genetics, and an introduction to the study of polygenic inheritance and population genetics. (Antirequisite: 55-212; prerequisite: 55-141.) (3 lecture, 3 laboratory hours a week.) (Limited enrolment.)

55-212. Genetics
An introduction to the principles and mechanisms of heredity. This course has three parts: Mendelian genetics, molecular genetics, and population genetics. It covers 1- and 2-locus systems, gene interactions, gene mapping, sex determination and sex linkage, cytogenetics, molecular genetics and an introduction to the study of polygenic inheritance and population genetics. This is a Distance Education course designed primarily for graduates of programs in Medical Technology from a College of Applied Arts and Technology. This course may be counted towards a General Science degree, but not as a “core” course for Biology Majors. (Antirequisite: 55-211; prerequisites: 55-100 and 55-101, or the equivalent.) (3 lecture, 3 laboratory hours or equivalent a week.)

55-213. General Physiology
Cell and organismic physiology with emphasis on basic life processes in both plants and animals, including nutrition, metabolism, energy transformations, transport mechanisms, signal transduction, and other general functions. (Prerequisite: 55-141; corequisite: 59-261.) (3 lecture, 3 laboratory hours or equivalent a week.) (Limited enrolment.)

55-234. Great Lakes Field Biology
The physical, chemical, and biological properties of the Great Lakes system; measures of transport and fate of contaminants in aquatic systems and food webs; changes in species abundance, composition, and distributions. Field work stresses sampling techniques and measurements of temporal and spatial variation. Students are required to complete a project and present a seminar. (Prerequisites: 55-210 and 65-253, or consent of instructor.) (2 weeks, Intersession; 26 hours lecture, 52 hours field/laboratory work, 8 hours seminar.) (Limited enrolment.)

55-237. Introductory Microbiology
Growth, genetics, structure, physiology, and diversity of microbes and viruses. (Antirequisites: 55-206, 55-238; prerequisites: OAC Biology, or both 55-100 and 55-101, or 55-140 and 55-141.) (3 lecture hours a week.)

55-238. Introductory Microbiology and Techniques
Growth, genetics, structure, physiology, and diversity of microbes and viruses. (Antirequisites: 55-206, 55-237; prerequisites: OAC Biology, or both 55-100 and 55-101, or 55-140 and 55-141.) (3 lecture, 3 laboratory hours a week.)(Limited enrolment.)

55-241. Infectious Diseases
The host-parasite interactions and pathogenicity of human microbial pathogens, with an emphasis on viral pathogens. A Distance Education course. (Antirequisite: 55-352; prerequisite: one of 55-206, 55-237, or 55-238; corequisite: 59-141.) (3 lecture hours a week.)

55-242. Immunology
The formation and structure of antibodies. Antigens and the mechanisms of antigen-antibody interactions. (Prerequisites: 55-140 and 55-141; corequisite: 59-230.) (2 lecture, 3 laboratory hours or equivalent a week.) (Limited enrolment.)

55-250. Comparative Vertebrate
Phylogeny of the chordates; comparative anatomy of key organ systems; emphasis on the anatomy of selected vertebrates in the laboratory. (Prerequisites: 55-140 and 55-141.) (3 lecture, 3 laboratory hours a week.) (Limited enrolment.)

55-298. Co-op Work Term I
Taken in the Summer term of Level II. (Graded on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis.) (Restricted to Environmental Biology Co-op students.)

55-299. Co-op Work Term II
Taken in the Fall term of Level II. (Graded on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis.) (Restricted to Environmental Biology Co-op students.)

55-320. Experimental Principles and Design in Biology
Introduction to the logic and principles used to develop sound and efficient studies in the biological sciences: generating, testing, and discriminating among hypotheses; dealing with unwanted sources of variation; assumptions and appropriate choice of statistical analysis. Instruction in the use of selected network and personal computer software for data analysis and presentation. (Prerequisites: 55-210, 55-211, 55-213, and 65-253, or consent of instructor.) (3 lecture, 2 laboratory/tutorial hours a week.) (Limited enrolment.)

55-324. Population Ecology
Topics of current interest in population theory including population growth and regulation, plant-herbivore interactions, optimal strategies of foraging, reproductive allocation, and the evolutionary responses of populations. (Prerequisites: 55-210 and 55-211.) (3 lecture hours a week.)

55-325. Community Ecology
Topics of current interest in community theory including predation and competition, species diversity and resource utilization, community energetics, and the relationship between complexity and stability of communities. (Prerequisite: 55-210.) (3 lecture hours a week.) (Limited enrolment.)

55-333. General Mycology
Biology of the fungi with emphasis on their interactions with animals and plants. (Prerequisite: 55-206 or 55-237 or 55-238 or consent of instructor.) (2 lecture, 3 laboratory hours a week.) (Limited enrolment.)

55-341. Evolution
Topics include the interaction of gene mutation, selection, and population characteristics in the process of evolution, mechanisms of speciation, and current problems in evolution. (Prerequisite: 55-211.) (3 lecture hours a week.)

55-350. Molecular Cell Biology
An integration of recent findings in molecular and cell biology with those in biochemistry and genetics. The main focus will be on regulation of gene transcription, intracellular signalling, transport processes, and cell cycle events. (Prerequisites: 55-211 and 55-213.) (3 lecture hours a week.)

55-351. Medical Microbiology
Viral and bacterial pathogenesis, including the processes and genetic control of human diseases. (Antirequisites: 55-241, 55-352; prerequisite: 55-206, 55-237, or 55-238.) (3 lecture hours a week.)

55-352 Medical Microbiology and Techniques
Viral and bacterial pathogenesis, including the processes and genetic control of human diseases. (Antirequisites: 55-241, 55-351; prerequisite: 55-238.) (3 lecture, 3 laboratory hours a week.)(Limited enrolment.)

55-355. Principles of Animal Development
Cellular, molecular, and biochemical mechanisms of gametogenesis, fertilization, cleavage, and organogenesis in a variety of animal systems. A major paper is required. (Prerequisites: 55-210, 55-211, and 55-213.) (3 lecture hours a week.)

55-357. Animal Cells and Tissues
The structure and organization of animal systems at the tissue, cellular, and subcellular levels. Contemporary techniques, including electron microscopy, immunocytochemistry, and in situ hybridization are discussed. (Prerequisites: 55-211 and 55-213.) (3 lecture, 3 laboratory hours a week.)

55-359. Invertebrate Biology
Survey of major classes of the invertebrates from an evolutionary, phylogenic, and ecological perspective. Emphasis on the morphological, physiological, and behavioural adaptations that permit animals to exploit the full range of earth's habitats, including the living bodies of other organisms (parasitism). (Prerequisites: 55-210, 55-211, and 55-213.) (3 lecture, 3 laboratory hours a week.)

55-366. Microbial Ecology and Physiology
Diversity of bacteria in natural habitats. Population interactions, community structure, and species diversity. Interactions between microorganisms and higher eukaryotes; biogeochemistry and biodegradation. (Prerequisites: 55-206 or 55-237 or 55-238; plus, 55-210, 55-211, and 55-213.) (2 lecture, 3 laboratory hours a week.) (Limited enrolment.)

55-420. Undergraduate Research in Biology
Completion of an undergraduate research project, including an oral presentation at an annual colloquium and submission of written final report. (Registration and selection of supervisor will be completed with consent of the Department Head.) (10 laboratory hours a week; offered over two terms.) (A 6.00 credit hour research project which counts as two courses.)

55-423. Undergraduate Research in Biology
Completion of an undergraduate research project, including an oral presentation at an annual colloquium and submission of written final report. (Registration and selection of supervisor will be completed with consent of the Department Head.) (Restricted to students who have completed 55-420.) (10 laboratory hours a week; offered over two terms.) (A 6.00 credit hour research project which counts as two courses.)

55-430. Ecotoxicology
The transport, fate and effects of toxic chemicals in aquatic ecosystems; food web modelling in the context of contaminant movement; risk assessment. Laboratory work will include toxicokinetics, toxicity testing, and measurements of contaminant stress. (Prerequisites: 55-210 and 55-213.) (3 lecture, 3 laboratory hours a week.)

55-437. Conservation Biology and Biogeography
Principles of conservation biology emphasizing population and biogeographic attributes, including genetics, habitat fragmentation, and island processes, which characterize endangered species and habitats. Case studies of management of threatened species and habitats will be addressed. (Prerequisites: 55-210 and 55-211, or consent of instructor.) (3 lecture hours a week.)

55-440. Biology of Fishes
The fishes are the most diverse, the oldest, and the most abundant group of vertebrates on earth. This course surveys their evolution, their phylogenetic relationships, and their morphological, physiological, behavioural, and ecological adaptations to life in virtually every aquatic environment on earth. The laboratory includes units on gross anatomy of a typical actinopterygian fish, identification of local fauna, study of age and growth, and other selected topics. (Prerequisites: 55-210, 55-211, 55-213.) (2 lecture, 3 laboratory hours a week, 1 field trip.)

55-444. Aquatic Ecology: Physical Processes and Biotic Responses
Physical properties and biotic responses in rivers and lakes, including morphometry, energy processing, behavioural adaptations of organisms, and interactions among organisms. (Prerequisite: 55-210.) (3 lecture, 3 laboratory hours a week, 1 week-end field trip.)

55-445. Aquatic Ecology: Community and Ecosystem Processes
Selected aspects of the ecology of large water masses—large lakes, estuaries, and oceans. Emphasis on physical properties and chemical dynamics of aquatic systems, and on life history
requirements in such systems. (Prerequisite: 55-210 or 55-234.) (3 lecture hours a week.)

55-453. Biology of Cell Transformation
Molecular and cellular mechanisms of cell transformation and tumor development with emphasis on the role of oncogenes and environmental factors in cell transformation, and on the cellular and molecular biology of malignantly transformed (cancerous) cells, experimental analysis and applications. A major paper and/or seminar is required. (Prerequisites: 55-211, 55-213, 59-230, 59-261, and consent of instructor.) (3 lecture hours, 1 tutorial/laboratory hour a week.) (Limited enrolment.)

55-454. Molecular Biology of Growth and Development I
Analysis at the molecular level of the growth and development of prokaryotes, phages, lower eukaryotes, and their plasmids. (Prerequisites: 55-211, 55-213, 59-360 and 59-361, or consent of course co-ordinator.) (3 lecture hours a week.)

55-455. Molecular Biology of Growth and Development II
Analysis at the molecular level of the activation and control of genes and proteins during oogenesis and early development in lower and higher eukaryotes. (Prerequisite: 55-454 or consent of course co-ordinator.) (3 lecture hours a week.)

55-464. Plant and Molecular Biology and Physiology
Plant development and its coordination by means of hormones and other molecular signals. Molecular approaches applied to the analysis and modification of plant development will be discussed. ( Prerequisite: 55-213.) (2 lecture hours, 1 seminar hour a week.)

55-468. Plant Ecology
Evolutionary and community aspects of plant interactions with other organisms and the physical environment. The course deals with plant demography at different levels: individual, population, community, and ecosystem. (Prerequisite: 55-210.) (2 lecture, 3 laboratory hours or equivalent a week.)

55-471. Virology
Bacterial, animal, and plant viruses, with emphasis on structure, nucleic acids, and replication. Interactions between viruses and host cells. Theoretical and practical aspects. (Prerequisites: 55-238 and 59-360.) (2 lecture, 3 laboratory hours or equivalent a week.) (Limited enrolment.)

55-477. Immunochemistry
Antigens; purification and characterization of immunoglobulins and monoclonal antibodies. Immunoassays using these antibodies. (Prerequisite: 55-242; corequisite: 59-360.) (2 lecture, 3 laboratory hours a week.) (Limited enrolment.)

55-480 to 55-483. Special Topics in Biology
Selected topics of current interest which may vary from year to year.
The University of Windsor is a member of the Ontario Summer Field Courses Program. Students may select and receive credit for one or more of over thirty field courses under the “Special Topics” designation. Courses are normally advertised in January. Because enrolment is limited, students should apply as early as possible. For further information, contact the Department.

55-484. Mammalian Physiology
Basic principles and mechanisms of general physiological controls, blood, body fluids, cardiovascular system, kidney function, and gas transport and exchange. (Prerequisites: 55-210, 55-211, 55-213.) (3 lecture, 3 laboratory hours or equivalent a week.)

55-485. Nerves, Muscles, and Glands
A systemic view of neural, muscular, and neuroendocrine regulation. Physiological control mechanisms at the levels of molecules through cells, neural circuits and behaviour are discussed. (Prerequisite: 55-213.) (3 lecture, 3 laboratory hours a week.)

55-498. Co-op Work Term III
Taken in the Winter term of Level IV. (Graded on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis.) (Restricted to only Environmental Biology Co-op students.)

55-499. Co-op Work Term IV
Taken in the Summer term of Level IV. (Graded on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis.) (Restricted to only Environmental Biology Co-op students.)