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Graduate Calendar
Winter 2020

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INTEGRATIVE BIOLOGY: COURSES

All courses listed will not necessarily be offered each year.

Biological Sciences provides three types of courses, each with a different primary purpose and format.

1) Fundamentals Courses: Fundamentals courses cover subject matter that is considered central to a comprehensive knowledge of principles and theories in the department's areas of research emphasis. The scope of these courses extends beyond that provided at the undergraduate level. These courses may entail formal lectures, laboratory instruction and/or directed readings and discussion, but the onus is on the course instructor to ensure that students are exposed to balanced and comprehensive coverage of the range of topics considered to represent the field. Because of their central importance to the Biological Sciences, these courses are offered on a regular, recurring basis.

2) Special Topics Courses: Special topics courses provide detailed expertise in theory and/or techniques in areas of researchers' expertise that are especially relevant to students' thesis research. Although no less rigorous than fundamentals courses, these courses may provide greater depth of information over a narrower subject range. The scope of these courses extends beyond that provided at the undergraduate level. These courses may involve a combination of lectures, laboratories, discussion, readings and/or student presentations under the guidance of the instructor. A Special Topics course will have an explicit subtitle indicating the theme of a particular offering. Some Special Topics courses will be offered each year. The themes will vary among years to reflect the expertise of the instructors available and the current needs of the graduate students.

3) Selected Readings Courses: The primary goal of the Selected Readings courses is to develop students' skill in objective, critical analysis of scholarly work among individuals with broadly similar research interests and backgrounds. An equally important aspect of these courses is to promote interaction among students and faculty and to help participants become aware of new research across a range of subdisciplines. The role of students in selecting and presenting relevant material is central to these courses.

BIOL-8004. Selected Readings in the Biological Sciences
Current publications on common themes of potential significance in students' area of study will be chosen for round table oral presentation and discussion. Multiple sections, each with enrollment of 8-12 students will be offered in the fall term of each year as required. This course is intended for graduate students in Biological Sciences only. (2 discussion hours a week.)

BIOL-8014. Selected Readings in the Biological Sciences
Current publications on common themes of potential significance in students' area of study will be chosen for round table oral presentation and discussion. Multiple sections, each with enrollment of 8-12 students will be offered in the winter term of each year as required. This course is intended for graduate students in Biological Sciences only. (2 discussion hours a week.)

BIOL-8018. Techniques in Molecular Biology
A course designed to introduce the student to a variety of biochemical, cellular, and molecular techniques. This course is composed of a series of topics from which students are required to participate in a minimum of four. The topics include: chromatography, electrophoresis, immunocytochemistry, electron microscopy, cell culture, cloning and nucleic acid analysis, computer-based protein and nucleic acid analysis, and radioisotope methods. Students should consult with their research advisors and supervisory committees in choosing the topics for study. (Prerequisite: consent of instructor.) (2 lecture hours, 4 laboratory hours a week for selected experiments during the year, both terms.) (One term course credit.) (Offered in alternative years.)

BIOL-8208. Special Topics in Population and Environmental Biology
This is a regularly offered course covering subjects that reflect current graduate program needs and departmental expertise in specific areas. The course addresses one or more theme subjects in any particular term. Students receive a course credit for each term in which they register for this course provided that a particular theme is not repeated. Where a theme parallels an undergraduate course listing, students may be required to attend some portion of the undergraduate course as a prerequisite or corequisite. Subjects that may be offered as special topics include but are not limited to the following: animal behaviour; advanced topics in aquatic ecology; biogeography, conservation biology, ecotoxicology, quantitative ecology. (Prerequisite: consent of instructor.) (2-3 discussion hours and/or up to 5 laboratory hours a week.)

BIOL-8270. Fundamental Topics in Population and Evolutionary Biology
Major topics may include the evolution of mating systems, population structure and demography, population genetics and life history variation, theory of optimal resource use. (Prerequisite: consent of instructor.) (3 lecture/discussion hours a week.) (Offered in alternate years.)

BIOL-8280. Fundamental Topics in Community Biology
Major topics include niche and diversity theory, trophic complexity and community stability, assembly of guilds, ecosystem structure and function, biogeography. (Prerequisite/corequisite: BIOL-3250, or consent of instructor.) (3 lecture/discussion hours a week.) (Offered in alternate years.)

BIOL-8508. Special Topics in Molecular and Developmental Biology
This is a regularly offered course covering subjects that reflect current graduate program needs and departmental expertise in specific areas. The course addresses one or more theme subjects in any particular term. Students receive a course credit for each term in which they register for this course provided that a particular theme is not repeated. Where a theme parallels an undergraduate course listing, students may be required to attend some portion of the undergraduate course as a prerequisite or corequisite. Subjects that may be offered as special topics include but are not limited to the following: biology of cell transformation; electron microscopy; genetic engineering and its applications; advanced topics in immunochemistry; advanced topics in microbial physiology and ecology; advanced topics in physiology; plant hormones and development; virology. (Prerequisite: consent of instructor.) (2-3 discussion hours and/or up to 5 laboratory hours a week.)

BIOL-8520. Molecular Biology of Growth and Development I
An analysis at the molecular level of the growth and development of prokaryotes, lower eukaryotes, and their plasmids. (Required: consent of instructor.) (2 discussion hours a week.) (Offered in alternate years.)

BIOL-8530. Molecular Biology of Growth and Development II
An analysis at the molecular level of the growth and development of plants and animals. (Required: consent of instructor.) (2 discussion hours a week.) (Offered in alternate years.)

BIOL-8900.Experimental Design and Analysis in Biological Research
Discussion of philosophical and quantitative approaches used to investigate biological systems, with emphasis on design and implementation of efficient and unbiased experiments. Students will use expertise acquired in lectures and readings to constructively evaluate their own and others' research proposals through round table discussions and individual presentation. (Prerequisite/corequisite: BIOL-3022, or consent of instructor.) (2 discussion hours a week.)

BIOL-8008. Special Topics in Biological Sciences I
Special Topics in the Biological Sciences courses may be used to introduce a new graduate offering, typically on a "trial" basis. Approved courses taken at Wayne State University or elsewhere, or courses offered by visiting professors may also fall into the category of Special Topics in the Biological Sciences. A limited number of these courses may be included in the program of graduate student.

BIOL-8018. Special Topics in Biological Sciences II
Special Topics in the Biological Sciences courses may be used to introduce a new graduate offering, typically on a "trial" basis. Approved courses taken at Wayne State University or elsewhere, or courses offered by visiting professors may also fall into the category of Special Topics in the Biological Sciences. A limited number of these courses may be included in the program of a graduate student.

BIOL-8970. Thesis Research
An original research project embodied into a concisely written thesis which conforms to the style and format of a recognized journal in the field of specialization. The student should register for this course during each term (including Summer) of residency at the University; however, this course may not be used for credit toward fulfilling the course requirements in the Master's program.

BIOL-9980. Dissertation Research
An original research investigation the results of which will be embodied in a concisely written dissertation conforming in style and format to a recognized journal in the field of specialization. The final paper should be of the highest quality possible and suitable for publication. The doctoral student should register for this course commencing the summer term of the first year of residency and subsequently for each term during which dissertation research will be carried out. In no case, however, may this course be used for credit toward fulfilling the course requirements in the Ph.D. program.

BEHAVIOUR AND NEUROSCIENCE FIELD

BIOL-8410. BCN Training Course
This short, intensive course examines specialized topics in Behaviour, Cognition and Neuroscience through collaborative presentations with leaders in the field. Students are required to understand the background of the specialized topic, and to participate in colloquia and laboratory experiments with visiting BCN scientists.

BIOL-8450. Sensory Ecology
This seminar/lecture course will examine interconnections between sensory biology and ecology as they relate to the evolution of signal reception. Special emphasis is placed on a comparative approach to understanding sensory neurobiology and the current state of the field of sensory ecology. (Note: It is recommended that students taking this course have completed Principle Neuroscience (55-258) or equivalent.)

BIOL-8400. Behavior and Physiology of Fishes
The goal of this course is to increase one’s understanding of current research in the behaviour and physiology in fishes by synthesizing and evaluating current literature, leading class discussions, assessing presentations of others and by preparing a review paper based on research ideas presented in the course. (Prerequisite: Any two of the following undergraduate courses or their equivalents from other universities: 55-204, 55-210, 55-425 or 55-440.)

BIOL-8470. Comparative Cognition
Evidence of general and specialized cognitive processes in human and non-human organisms will be investigated. Topics to be covered include perception, attention, and memory, concept formation, ecological and evolutionary bases of cognitive processes. Current research on these and other topics will be reviewed and discussed in a seminar format. (Prerequisite: Any two of the following undergraduate courses or their equivalents from other universities: PSYC-3530, PSYC-3580 or PSYC-3350.) (Also offered as PSYC-8570; Cross-listed with PSYC-4570.)

BIOL-8408. Advanced Behvioural Neurobiology
In depth case analyses will be conducted to show how animals have developed neural mechanisms to solve behavioral problems encountered in their specific environmental niches. Topics will cover sensory processes, motor strategies, and plastic changes of behavior. General principles in behavioral neurobiology will be discussed after examination of individual cases. Important research methods in behavioral neurobiology will also be introduced.(Co-requisite: 55-483.) (Note: It is recommended that students taking this course have completed Principle Neuroscience (55-258) or equivalent.)

BIOL-8418. Advanced Topics in Neurophysiology
This course emphasizes synaptic organization of the brain. It examines how physical stimuli are converted by neurons into sensations and how movement is controlled through integrative neuronal action. The mechanisms of learning and memory will be discussed at the neuronal and molecular levels. Important experimental approaches in contemporary neurophysiology will also be introduced.(Note: It is recommended that students taking this course have completed Principle Neuroscience (55-258) or equivalent.)