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Undergraduate Calendar
Spring 2018

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SOCIAL WORK: COURSES

Social Work courses 47-117, 47-118, 47-204 and 47-210 are open to all students in the University. Acceptance to the professional years (Years 3 and 4) of the B.S.W. program is required for registration in all other required 300 and 400 level courses. All Social Work elective courses in the professional program at the 300 and 400 level are restricted to senior level (i.e., beyond term 4) students in Social Work or cognate disciplines or require the permission of the instructor. Social Work majors will be given priority when registering for these courses.

All courses are three hours a week unless otherwise indicated.

**Note: The term “Social Work major” includes combined majors in Social Work and another program.

Social Work electives can be taken interchangeably by Year 3 and Year 4 students, except where prerequisites have been identified.
Not all courses listed will necessarily be offered each year.

47-117. Meeting Human Needs through Social Welfare
This course examines the historical, philosophical and political aspects of the development and delivery of the Canadian Social Welfare System. Special attention will be focussed on ways to identify and assess the needs of, and services to, vulnerable populations within the context of social and cultural diversity.

47-118. Meeting Human Needs through Social Work
This course examines the ways in which social workers in generalist practice intervene to meet the needs of clients within the Canadian social welfare system. Attention will be paid to the development of an understanding of generalist social work practice within an ecological and systems perspective.This course provides an introduction to social work processes. Attention will be given to the needs of vulnerable and marginalized populations within traditional and alternative social work perspectives such as ecological, systems, strengths, feminist, and anti-oppressive practice. Students will gain an understanding of personal, professional, agency, and societal needs and values and how they influence social work practice. Students will be introduced to the generalist social work practice perspective within a problem-solving process that includes focused assessment, intervention, termination, and evaluation of practice. Ethical and professional issues such as confidentiality and accountability will be introduced.

47-204. Issues and Perspectives in Social Welfare
Examines various ideologies that underpin the social welfare system and their impact on citizens, clients, communities, organizations, and society as a whole. The impact of these diverse perspectives on the different roles of social workers are examined with particular emphasis on value conflicts and how these conflicts shape and affect policies and programs. Further, the role and development of professional ethics relative to social service delivery through social welfare systems are explored.(Prerequisites: 47-117 and 47-118 or permission of instructor.)(Students may not take both 47-204 and 47-302 for credit.)

47-210. Social Work and Diversity
This course examines oppression and anti-oppressive social work practice from a broad ecological framework as they relate to social inequality and life circumstances. Various forms of oppression such as racism, ableism, anti-semitism, heterosexism, and sexism are analyzed at the individual, cultural, and institutional level while applying the professional values and ethics of social work practice. The experiences, needs, and responses of populations that have been historically excluded, marginalized, and disadvantaged are examined. Students develop analytical and self-reflective skills as they relate to social work practice which fosters inclusion, participation, advocacy, and social justice. (Prerequisites: 47-117 and 47-118 or permission of instructor.)

47-336. Theory and Practice of Social Work with Individuals
This course examines the knowledge base, principles and techniques of social work generalist practice and the use of social work values in the context of offering help focusing on individuals (micro-level). Included are the use of interpersonal relationships as a medium for helping and the use of theories of human interaction within various systems as a base for problem assessment. Emphasis will be on practice with individuals in their social context. (Must be taken prior to field education courses)

47-337. Theory and Practice of Social Work with Small Groups
This course builds upon the generalist practice model of social work presented in 47-336. It extends generalist social work concepts to small groups as client systems. Focus will be on analysis and application of generalist knowledge, values and skills for assessment and intervention with small groups. (Must be taken prior to field education courses) (Must be taken concurrently with 47-336).

47-338. Theory and Practice of Social Work with Families
This course builds upon the generalist model of social work practice. It extends generalist social work concepts to families as multi-client systems. Focus will be on analysis and application of generalist knowledge, values and skills for assessment and intervention with families. (Prerequisites 47-336 and 47-337) (Must be taken prior to or concurrently with 47-371.)

47-339. Theory and Practice of Social Work with Communities and Organizations
This course applies the generalist social work practice model at the macro level. It focuses on planning, implementing, and evaluating interventions with communities and human service organizations. Special emphasis will be placed on addressing the needs and issues of diverse, at-risk, and oppressed populations. (Prerequisite: 47-336 and 47-337.) (Must be taken prior to or concurrently with 47-371.)

47-344. Research I: Foundations of Social Work Research
This course will prepare students to critically analyze generalist social work practice research. Foundation principles of rational and empirical inquiry will be examined across the continuum of qualitative and quantitative research designs that can be appropriately used in various practice contexts. It aims to enable the practical interpretation of research used integratively in practice with diverse clients, particularly those at risk of being marginalized or oppressed. (Prerequisite: 3rd or 4th year Social Work Major or Combined Major in Social Work, or permission of instructor.)

47-346. Risk and Resilience: Perspectives on Human Development
Examines human development in the social environment from a strengths-based perspective. Using a biopsychosocial orientation, emphasis is placed on identifying risk and protective factors that affect coping and adaptation to stressful life events. Focuses on how social systems (families, groups, organizations, institutions, and communities) promote or deter such efforts. Implications for multilevel interventions are discussed and evaluated. (Open to senior students. Social Work Majors and Combined Majors in Social Work will be given registration priority.)

47-347. Social Work and Violence
Examines aspects of violence in society, particularly against marginalized groups. The primary focus is on generalist social work intervention related to violence. (Open to senior students. Required course for Social Work/Women's and Gender Studies students; elective for BSW students. Pre-requisite: One Women's and Gender Studies (53-) course or permission of the instructor. (Also offered as 53-347.)

47-350. Practical Strategies for Social Change: Intervening to Prevent Sexual Assault
This course provides male and female students with an introduction to sexual violence as a social problem. The course addresses how this social problem manifests, why it matters, how it persists, and finally, how it can be changed. The importance of personal and community responsibility for social change is emphasized. This course also provides students with the background knowledge that is needed to successfully teach sexual assault prevention education sessions for fellow students, using the Bringing in the Bystander® In Person Prevention workshop. Selected students will deliver the workshop by taking Practicum in Social Change (02-450/46-450/47-450/48-451/53-450) the following semester. Restricted to students who have attained a cumulative GPA of 66% or higher at the time of application. (Prerequisite: Semester 4 standing or above and permission of the instructor by online application at uwindsor.ca/bystander.) (Also offered as 02-350, 46-350, 48-350, and 53-351.)

47-355. Feminist Social Work Practice
This course prepares students to apply the principles, processes, and techniques of feminist social work practice. Required course for Social Work/Women's and Gender Studies students; elective for BSW students (Prerequisites:(47-336, 47-337 plus three (53-xxx) Women Studies courses or, consent of instructor.) (Also offered as 53-355)

47-356. Serving Older People
The role of the social worker in such areas as institutionalization, community care and social support, separation and loss, family structures, and retirement, with emphasis on social policy as a determinant of services and practice. (Open to senior students. Social Work Majors and Combined Majors in Social Work will be given registration priority.)

47-357. Child Welfare
Examines issues in the present structure and functioning of services for children. The rights of children and their need for services will be examined in relation to existing services, such as protection, adoption, foster care, health services, and compulsory education, with special attention to extra-family parenting responsibilities. (Open to senior students. Social Work Majors and Combined Majors in Social Work will be given registration priority.)

47-371. Field Education Preparation
The Field Education Preparation course (47-371) examines student progress in the social work program with the purpose of evaluating student readiness for a field practicum. Students will demonstrate the foundation level social work knowledge, skills, and values required to meet field education expectations and to ensure success in the field. The course integrates classroom and field learning through co-instructed learning sessions that include skill development facilitated by Field Learning Specialists with extensive practice experience, community resources training from community agencies and practicing professionals, exposure to service users, and assignments that require interaction with agencies and the community. This course will facilitate student development and growth on personal, professional, and civic levels. In addition, the course will ensure a smooth transition from the classroom setting into the field setting by demonstrating how connecting theory and practice results in successful individual, family, group, and community intervention. Finally, the course facilitates the development of professional, reflective, self-evaluating, and competent social workers. (Pre-requisites 47-336 and 47-337. Correquisites 47-338 and 47-339).(Contact Hours: 3.0)

47-412. Selected Topics in Social Work
Selected topics according to faculty and student interests may be offered. Topics may include issues related to social work practice, social welfare, or fields of practice. (May be repeated for credit if the course content differs.) (Open to senior students. Social Work Majors and Combined Majors in Social Work will be given registration priority.)

47-423. Social Policy and Social Welfare
This course introduces the student to the formulation and analysis of social policy. The student uses knowledge of social services as a basis for assessing and recommending changes in existing programs or services, and for introducing new services. Special attention is given to identifying policy gaps in services and unmet needs of vulnerable populations within the general practice framework. (Prerequisite: 4th year Social Work Major or Combined Major in Social Work, or permission of instructor.) (Credit cannot be obtained for both 47-303 and 47-423).

47-430. Integration Seminar I
The Integration Seminar I course is taken concurrently with the Field Education I course (47-473). This seminar course builds on the knowledge, skills, and values developed in the theory and practice courses 47-336, 337, 338 & 339, along with problem solving models covered in 47-344 and 47- 371. The focus of learning for this course will be the application of concepts from theories and practice models to the process of assessment and intervention planning. The seminar enables students to integrate academic learning and field work experience to test and advance social work knowledge, values, and skills in preparation for professional social work practice. The course will provide students with opportunities to share their field placement experiences with the instructor and peers. This course will include classroom instruction, simulations, self reflection, discussions, group sharing and problem solving, and presentations to facilitate the development of professional, reflective, self-evaluating, and competent social workers. (Prerequisites: 47-371, 47-336, 47-337, 47-338, 47-339, 47-344) (Co-requisite: 47-473)

47-431. Integration Seminar II
The Integration Seminar II course is taken concurrently with the Field Education II course (47-475). This seminar course builds on the knowledge, skills, and values developed in Field Education I (47-473) and Integration Seminar I (47-430). The seminar enables students to integrate academic learning and field work experience to test and advance social work knowledge, values, and skills in preparation for professional social work practice. The course will provide students with opportunities to share their field placement experiences with the instructor and peers. Students will participate in a variety of activities, including self reflection, discussions, group sharing and problem solving and presentations to facilitate the development of professional, reflective, self-evaluating, and competent social workers. Students will be expected to engage in critical reflection to integrate knowledge and skills from generalist practice into their own developing practice framework. (Pre-requisite: 47-430, 47-473) (Co-requisite: 47-475).

47-434. Social Work with Children
This course is designed to provide students with knowledge and understanding of social work practice with children. The focus is upon the development of a framework of knowledge for making practice decisions involving the child client. The design, implementation, and evaluation of alternative social work intervention strategies are included. The special set of techniques utilized in social work practice with children will be highlighted. (Open only to senior students. Social Work Majors and Combined Majors in Social Work will be given registration priority.)

47-448. Professional Issues in Social Work
This course examines topics of current relevance for the profession of social work. Professional issues such as social control, suitability, ethical dilemmas, work-place issues of power, oppression and marginalization will be considered. The Social Work Code of Ethics will be used as the "lens" to explore case examples of situations that present professionals with ethical dilemmas, that challenge personal and professional values and require a sound grounding in professional ethical decision-making in the face of grave circumstances. Empowerment practice will serve as an integrative framework for the consideration of professional issues. (Open to senior students. Social Work Majors and Combined Majors in Social Work will be given registration priority.)

47-450. Practicum in Social Change
Supervised practicum in a university setting. Students consolidate and enhance their knowledge of sexual assault and bystander intervention. Students co-facilitate the Bringing in the Bystander® In Person Prevention program for one or more small groups of students on campus. The practicum experience equips students to deliver educational content on sensitive issues. (Prerequisite: 02-350/46-350/47-350/48-350/53-351 and permission of the instructor.) (Also offered as 02-02-450, 46-450, 48-451, and 53-450.)

47-455. Social Work and Mental Health
This course focuses on social work practice in the field of mental health. It will integrate policy, practice and research to mental health issues across the life-span. The course will examine social work practice assessment and intervention techniques. Both chronic and acute mental health issues will be examined. Community-based care and institutional care perspectives will be presented. (Open to senior students. Social Work Majors and Combined Majors in Social Work will be given registration priority.)

47-456. Social Work and Health
Explores generalist social work practice with various client systems in transaction with the Canadian health care system. Systems' structural characteristics as well as their philosophical underpinnings will be surveyed in a historical and theoretical context. This will be accomplished with current social work models using the person-in-environment framework and general systems theory. (Open to senior students. Social Work Majors and Combined Majors in Social Work will be given registration priority.)

47-457. Social Work and Addictions
Provides social work students with practice knowledge concerning the etiology, implications, and treatment issues related to addictions and substance abuse. Topics will include the history and consequences of addictions and substance abuse, addictions and the family, special at-risk groups, social policy and legal issues, medical and social-psychological aspects, and current research issues as well as the implications for intervention. (Open to senior students. Social Work Majors and Combined Majors in Social Work will be given registration priority.)

47-461. Field Practice II – A
Provides students with professionally supervised experience in community agencies and programs and with opportunities to carry generalist social work practice responsibilities. Provides enhanced opportunities to integrate knowledge and skills sufficient for responsible entry into social work practice upon graduation. (Open only to fourth-year Social Work Majors and Combined Majors in Social Work.) (Must be taken concurrently with 47-436 and 47-462.) (100 hours per semester, normally 1 day per week.)

47-462. Field Practice II – B
(Open only to fourth-year Social Work Majors and Combined Majors in Social Work. Must be taken concurrently with 47-436 and 47-461. 100 hours per semester, normally 1 day per week.)

47-463. Field Practice II – C
(Open only to fourth-year Social Work Majors and Combined Majors in Social Work. Must be taken concurrently with 47-437 and 47-464. 100 hours per semester, normally 1 day per week.)

47-464. Field Practice II – D
(Open only to fourth-year Social Work Majors and Combined Majors in Social Work. Must be taken concurrently with 47-437 and 47-463. 100 hours per semester, normally 1 day per week.)

47-473. Field Education I
The Field Education I course examines student progress in the field practice component of the Bachelor of Social Work program with the purpose of evaluating student readiness for Field Education II. Students will demonstrate the foundation level social work knowledge, skills, and values required to meet field practice expectations and ensure success in Field Education II (47-475). This course integrates classroom and experiential learning through placement in a community organization. Under the supervision of professional social workers, students are expected to apply beginning level knowledge, skills, values and ethics to generalist social work practice in “real-life” situations. The objectives and competencies outlined in the Field Education I Learning Agreement are minimum expectations for all students. The course fosters professional development wherein personal and professional skills are promoted in the interest of competent professional practice. Students will develop competence as an entry level professional in generalist social work practice within the four contexts of practice: organization, community, social work skills and professional context. Supported by Field Learning Specialists with extensive practice experience and professional social workers, students will develop substantive understanding of social work knowledge, values and skills and demonstrate an understanding of and commitment to the principles which underlie professional social work practice.This course operates as a practicum three days a week in the Fall semester. (Prerequisites: 47-371, 47-336, 47-337, 47-338, 47-339, 47-344) (Co-requisite: 47-416, 47-423, 47-430).(Credit weight 9)

47-475. Field Education II
The Field Education II course (47-475) examines student progress in the field practice component of the Bachelor of Social Work program with the purpose of evaluating student readiness for professional social work practice. This course takes place in the approved field education agency in which the student successfully completed Field Education I (47-473). Under the continuing supervision of professional social workers, students are expected to develop competencies that go beyond the generic base acquired during Field Education I (47-473). Students are expected to build upon the knowledge, values and skills acquired in Field Education I to move along the continuum from beginning level social work knowledge to an increasingly complex level of skill development in generalist social work practice. The objectives and competencies outlined in the Field Education II Learning Agreement are minimum expectations for all students. Students will apply professional skills and techniques as well as analytical competence to work with direct and indirect systems in an agency/community setting to develop an understanding of the relationships between human behaviour and societal processes. Students will demonstrate self-awareness and self-discipline sufficient to enable students to apply their knowledge, values, and skills when working with client systems. Supported by Field Learning Specialists, this course will result in the development of critical thinking skills and an inquiring interest in professional issues and knowledge, along with a commitment to the ethical principles of Social Work and the development of a professional identity. This course operates as a practicum four days a week in the Winter semester. (Prerequisites: 47-473, 47-430) (Co-requisite 47-431) (Credit weight 12)