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Undergraduate Calendar
Fall 2020

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CIVIL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING: COURSES

CIVIL ENGINEERING

Students must have completed at least eight (8) of their 1st year courses before being allowed to register into the 2nd year courses.
Students must have completed all the 1st year courses and at least nine (9) of their 2nd year courses before being allowed to register into the 3rd year courses.
Students cannot register into any of the 4th year courses until they have completed nine (9) 3rd year Civil Engineering courses and all courses from 1st and 2nd year.

CIVL-2190. Materials in Civil and Environmental Engineering
Fundamental materials in civil and environmental engineering. Concrete: Portland cement, hydration, mixture design, admixtures, mixing, placing and curing. Masonry: masonry units, mortar, grout, and plaster, types of bond and joints. Timber: Structure and types of wood. Iron and steel: cast iron, wrought iron, steel products, structural steel, reinforcing steel, welded wire fabrics. Wastewater and biosolids, Coagulant and adsorbents. Particulate air pollutants. Solid waste and hazardous waste.

CIVL-2200. Civil Engineering Information Systems
A course in information systems in civil engineering including Surveying, GPS, GIS and Graphic communication. Surveying: Distance measurements; Leveling theory of differential leveling, curvature and refraction, types of surveying levels, leveling rods, benchmark leveling, profile and cross-section leveling; Angles and Theodolites: reference directions for vertical angles, meridians, horizontal angles, Total Station: reference directions for vertical angles, meridians, horizontal angles; Transverses Survey and Computations: balancing field angles, meridians, bearings, azimuths, latitude departures; Curves: circular curves, vertical curves, spiral curves. Introduction to GPS and GIS; applications of GIS and GPS in surveying. Graphic communication using AutoCAD. Required field trip*. (one week; immediately following the final examination period.) *Note: There will be no additional fees for the field camp course.

CIVL-3510. Fluid Mechanics
Continuity, energy, momentum concepts. Boundary layers. Pipe flow including network installations. Rotodynamic pumps, system curves. Irrotational flow, flownets. Introduction to open channel flow: specific energy, flow regimes; uniform, (Prerequisite: GENG-1200 and MATH-2790 (3 lecture, 2 laboratory hours a week.)

CIVL-3520. Stress Analysis
Distribution of internal loading in structural members; Deflection of beams; Moment areas theorems; Virtual work; Castigliano's theorems; Maxwell-Betti reciprocal theorem; Buckling of columns; and Application of Energy methods in simple determinate structures. (Prerequisite: GENG-2180) (3 lecture and 2 laboratory/tutorial hours a week.)

CIVL-3530. Structural Analysis
Stability and determinacy of trusses and frames; analysis of statically determinate trusses and frames;Influence lines and moving loads. Statically indeterminate structures; force method; displacement method. (Prerequisite: GENG-2180.) (3 lecture, 2 laboratory hours a week.).

CIVL-3540. Concrete Design
Mechanics and behaviour of reinforced concrete components. Analysis and ultimate strength design of reinforced concrete beams and one-way slabs. Design for serviceability. Design for columns. Laboratory work includes design and testing of a concrete beam. (Prerequisite: GENG-2180) (3 lecture, 2 laboratory hours a week.)

CIVL-3550. Geotechnical Engineering I
Index properties of soils. Soil structure and classification of soils. Soil compaction and stabilization. Hydraulic principles of flow through soils, flow nets. Frost action in soils. Effective stresses. Compressibility, consolidation, and settlement analysis. Shear strength of soil. Kinematics and Stress distribution in soil. Stress analysis and stability of slopes (Prerequisite: GENG-2180.) (3 lecture, 3 laboratory hours a week.)

CIVL-3610. Masonry and Concrete Design
Analysis and design of columns, two-way slabs, and footings. Design of RC bearing walls and retaining walls. Design of masonry units for axial, flexure, and combined loads; Design of masonry beams, flexural and load bearing walls; columns, and pilasters; (Prerequisite: CIVL-3540) (3 lecture, 2 laboratory hours a week.)

CIVL-3620. Finite Element for Analysis and Design
Limit state design concepts; load factors and combinations; load specifications for structural design calculations. Introduction to the finite element method; computer-aided analysis of structures. (Prerequisite: CIVL-3530) (3 lecture, 2 tutorial hours a week.)

CIVL-3630. Geotechnical Engineering II
Earth pressure and design of retaining walls. Sheet-pile walls, braced and tie back excavations. Combined pressures. Soil bearing capacity. Soil exploration. Load induced pressures and settlements. Footings and eccentrically loaded foundations. Raft and pile foundations. Piles and pile driving, cofferdams and caissons. (Prerequisites: GENG-2180 and CIVL-3550) (3 lecture, 3 laboratory hours a week).

CIVL-3640. Structural Steel Design
Design of structural steel components subjected to axial tension and compression forces, shear force, bending moment, and combined bending and compression; Design of Composite beams -; Design of simple bolted and welded connections; Computer-aided design of steel structures. (Prerequisite: GENG-2180 and CIVL-3520.) (3 lecture, 2 tutorial hours a week.)

CIVL-3650. Transportation and Traffic Engineering
Characteristics of transportation systems; rail, highway, airway, waterway, and pipeline, urban transportation planning, analysis and prediction, traffic impacts studies, highway and intersection capacity, characteristics of traffic flow, traffic control principles, queuing theory. (3 lecture, 2 laboratory hours a week.)

CIVL-4000. Capstone Design Project
A significant design experience which is based on knowledge and skills acquired in earlier course work. Engineering design integrates mathematics, basic science, engineering sciences and complementary studies in developing elements, systems and processes to meet specific needs while considering economic, health, safety, environmental, social or other pertinent factors. It involves a creative, iterative, and open-ended process Written and oral reports are required. (Prerequisite: consent of the supervisor and Department Head.) (2 hours lecture and 4 hours lab/week) (2 semester course)

CIVL-4710. Hydrology
Hydrologic Cycle, Weather. Precipitation: intensity, frequency, duration; Point and area estimates of precipitation; rational methods. Hydrologic abstractions. Runoff: storms, conceptual models, unit hydrograph principles, inflow design hydrograph. Streamflow: gauging, stage-discharge. Channel and Reservoir flood routing. Snowmelt. basics of hydrologic modeling; Probability applications and frequency analysis of precipitation and floods. Groundwater flow and water wells. Hydrologic design of urban and highway structures (Prerequisites: GENG-2220 and CIVL-3510 or consent of the instructor/ Department Head.) (3 lecture, 2 laboratory hours a week.)

CIVL-4720. Hydraulics
Review of basic concepts. Gradually and rapidly varied flows; surface profiles. Design of open channels with non-erodible and erodible beds; steady gradually varied flow computations in prismatic and non-prismatic channels; computer methods including HEC2. Design of hydraulic structures including gravity and arch dams, spillways, and outlet structures. (Prerequisite: CIVL-3510.) (3 lecture, 2 laboratory hours a week.)

CIVL-4810. Highway Design and Construction
Geometric design of highways and at-grade intersections; horizontal and vertical alignments, Cross--section elements, drainage; highway soil engineering including soil stabilization; bituminous materials; rigid and flexible pavement design; construction of pavements. (Prerequisite: GENG-2180 or CIVL-3520.) ( 3 lecture, 2 laboratory hours a week.)

CIVL-4820. Planning and Construction Management
The planning portion of this course will cover the elements of proper urban planning, the Planning Act, official plans, zoning by-laws, and subdivision design guidelines. The construction management portion will cover construction industry characteristics; types of business ownerships; organizational structures; drawings and specifications; estimating and bidding; types of construction contracts; insurance, bonding and claims; financial considerations; project cost controls and scheduling; project planning and administration; computer applications in construction industry, quality assurance, and construction safety. (3 lecture, 2 tutorial hours a week.)

APPROVED COURSES TO FULFILL NON-SPECIFIED ENGINEERING COURSE REQUIREMENTS

CIVL-4910. Foundation Engineering
Footings and eccentrically loaded foundations. Raft and pile foundations. Piles and pile driving, cofferdams and caissons. Soil-structure interaction. Computer-aided analysis and design of foundations (Prerequisite: CIVL-3550.) ( 3 lecture hours, 2 laboratory/tutorial hour a week.)

CIVL-4920. Advanced Topics in Structural Design
Design of plate girders and composite structures. Introduction to prestressed concrete and wood design. (Prerequisite: CIVL-3610 and CIVL-3640.) (3 lecture, 2 tutorial hours a week.)

CIVL-4940. Transportation Systems Analysis
Socio-economic impacts on transportation, four-stage demand modeling system, use of models in transportation planning and forecasting, data and space issues, regression and discrete choice models; choice of modes, destinations and routes, passenger and freight travel, introduction to land use modeling. (Prerequisite: CIVL-3650) (3 lecture, 2 laboratory hours a week.)

ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING

Students must have completed at least eight (8) of their 1st year courses before being allowed to register into the 2nd year courses.
Students must have completed all the 1st year courses and at least nine (9) of their 2nd year courses before being allowed to register into the 3rd year courses.
Students cannot register into any of the 4th year courses until they have completed nine (9) 3rd year Environmental Engineering courses and all courses from 1st and 2nd year.

ENVE-3510. Thermodynamics
Real gas behaviour and equations of state. The First and Second Laws of Thermodynamics and their applications. (3 lecture hours, 2 tutorial hours a week.)

ENVE-3520. Environmental Chemical Analysis
Environmental site assessment, statistical analysis of environmental data. Important characteristics of air, water, wastewater, and solid wastes. Basic concepts in quantitative analysis of physical, chemical, and biological parameters. Environmental site assessment, statistical analysis of environmental data. Instrumental methods of analysis for organic and inorganic contaminants in air, water, and soil. (Prerequisite: CHEM-1103.) (3 lecture, 2 tutorial/laboratory hours a week.)

ENVE-3610. Transport Phenomena
Introduction to the unifying theory of transport phenomena. Estimation of viscosities, thermal conductivities, and diffusivities for gases and liquids. Shell balances and some case studies of momentum, energy, and mass-transport. Mass transfer applications involving examples relevant to the environment. (3 lecture, 2 tutorial hours a week).

ENVE-3620. Air Pollution Control
Regulations and methods of source testing and monitoring. Nomenclature of organic compounds. Dispersion modelling. Air pollution control methods, designs, and their relative effectiveness. (Prerequisite: GENG-2500) (3 lecture, 2 lab/tutorial hours per week).

ENVE-3630. Water and Wastewater Treatment
Water and wastewater quality, guidelines and standards, flow fluctuation and design capacity. Design of different unit operations and processes in water and wastewater treatment. (Prerequisites: GENG-2500 and a course in fluid mechanics or hydraulics.) (3 lecture, 3 laboratory hours a week.)

ENVE-3640. Materials Recovery and Waste Management
The study, characterization, and analysis of municipal and industrial solid waste systems. Waste reduction, reuse, and recycling. Managing, collecting and transporting solid wastes. Waste reclamation and disposal methods, including landfiling, incineration, and composting. Waste management policies, regulations and facility siting issues. Various assignments will be integrated into a comprehensive project. (Prerequisite: GENG-2500.) (3 lecture hours).

ENVE-4000. Capstone Design Project
A significant design experience which is based on knowledge and skills acquired in earlier course work. Engineering design integrates mathematics, basic science, engineering sciences and complementary studies in developing elements, systems and processes to meet specific needs while considering economic, health, safety, environmental, social or other pertinent factors. Written and oral reports are required. (Prerequisite: consent of the supervisor and Department Head.) (2 lecture, 4 lab/tutorial hours per week (2 terms).

ENVE-4710. Water Distribution and Wastewater Collection Systems
Quantities of water and wastewater; development of surface and groundwater sources; design, construction, and maintenance of water distribution systems; design, construction, and maintenance of wastewater collection systems. (Prerequisite: CIVL-3510 Fluid Mechanics or equivalent.) (3 lecture, 2 tutorial/laboratory hours a week).

ENVE-4720. Chemical Reaction Engineering
Classification of chemical reactions and reactors, the rate equation, ideal reactor concept. Design equations for batch and flow (CSTR and PFR) reactors. Multiple reaction and reactor systems. Reactor design calculations under isothermal and non-isothermal conditions. (3 lecture, 2 tutorial hours a week).

ENVE-4730. Environmental Engineering Microbiology
Nature of inorganic and organic pollutants; biological approaches to environmental pollution problems; microorganisms; nutritional requirements and growth; metabolic pathways; energy generation and utilization in biological systems; response to changes in environment; pathogenic microorganisms and disinfection. (3 lecture hours a week, 1 tutorial/laboratory hour a week).

ENVE-4810. Sustainability in Engineering
Environmental impact assessment. Biophysical and socioeconomic impacts from engineering activities, processes, and projects. Human health and environmental risk concepts. Introduction to life cycle analysis, corporate/industrial environmental management, and environmental management systems. Students will undertake various project related and problem-based assignments. (3 lecture, 2 tutorial hours a week.) (Credit may only be obtained for one of MECH-4228, or ENVE-4810).

ENVE-4820. Hydrogeological Engineering
Fundamental physics and properties of groundwater flow in porous geologic material; anisotropy, heterogeneity. Introduction to the theory of groundwater flow; groundwater flow equations and patterns, recharge and discharge, flow nets, aquifer pumping, two-phase flow and well hydraulics. Aquifer development and management. Introduction to chemical hydrogeology and non-aqueous phase liquids, Wellhead protection. Numerical modeling concepts. (Prerequisites: MATH-1720, MATH-1730, CIVL-3510 and CIVL-4710, or consent of instructor.) (3 lecture, 2 laboratory hours a week.)

PROGRAMS
CIVIL ENGINEERING PROGRAM
ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING PROGRAM

CIVIL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING: COURSES
ENGINEERING: GENERAL COURSES (85)
ENGINEERING: APPROVED LIST OF COURSES OUTSIDE ENGINEERING