University Slogan - The degree that works
Undergraduate Calendar
Fall 2020

Click here for a Printer Friendly page.

Quic
k Links

KINESIOLOGY: COURSES


Not all courses listed will necessarily be offered each year.
Kinesiology "Core" courses are restricted to students registered as Kinesiology majors.

For Kinesiology major courses (300 and 400 level) non-Kinesiology majors may be admitted only with the permission of instructor.

All courses are three hours a week (3.00 credit hours) unless otherwise indicated.

KINE-1000. Health and Wellness
This introductory course will examine health and wellness from both a local and global perspective. Personal health and wellness will be evaluated from a physical, mental, spiritual and social perspective. Behavioural change and motivational techniques will be explored to aid in achieving a healthier lifestyle. This course will introduce various topics that impact the health and wellness of an individual including physical activity, nutrition, obesity, stress, disease prevention, high risk behaviour, health care systems, alternative medicine, violence in society and the environment. Current health and wellness issues within the community and media will also be presented. (Open to Kinesiology majors only.)

KINE-1030.Movement Science Perspectives
This course will present an overview of the biophysical sub-disciplines that comprise Kinesiology. Treatment of each sub-discipline will highlight the history of the area, the current state of research and the practical application of principles in Kinesiology to sport, the workplace and activities of daily living. (Open only to non-Kinesiology majors.)

KINE-1040. Introduction to Kinesiology: Sport Management and Sociocultural Perspectives
An introduction and overview of key areas within the sport management and sociocultural sub-disciplines of Kinesiology. The course will explore the historical, social, cultural, and political significance of sport, and relate that significance to understanding the ways in which sport is organized, managed and promoted in contemporary society. (Open only to non-Kinesiology majors.) (3 lecture hours/week.)

KINE-1050. Introductory Exercise Physiology
The focus of this 1st year course in exercise physiology is to introduce students to the various physiological systems of the human body and how they respond to acute and chronic bouts of physical activity. The course will highlight how the human body responds to accommodate the exercise stimulus and the benefits of exercise. Designed to stimulate interest in the Movement Science area of our program. (Open to Kinesiology majors only.)

KINE-1110. Principles of Mental Skills Training
This course surveys the psychological principles underlying cognitive techniques that can be used to improve performance and enjoyment in physical activity environments such as sport and exercise. Among the topics to be explored will be goal setting, anxiety control, and attentional focus.

KINE-1200. Introduction to the Sport Industry
This course introduces students to macro aspects of the sport industry, including the key decision-making bodies, governance structures, funding pathways, and legal considerations in the public, non-profit, and commercial sectors of sport and recreation. This course provides an overview of current industry trends and issues, while exposing students to the wide variety of career opportunities that exist in sport and recreation. Students will gain a foundational understanding of the various sport systems that work to organize and administer sport and recreation at the community, national, and international levels. 3 lecture hours/week.

KINE-1330. Introduction to Sport Leadership
This course introduces students to leadership in the context of sport organizations. Specifically, it provides an introduction to leadership theories, the implications of leadership style on individual, group, and organizational factors, and the role that a leader can play in defining organizational culture, values, and volunteer and/or staff engagement. This course will discuss various sociological issues that often dictate who and why certain individuals occupy leadership positions over others. Students will have an opportunity to engage in professional development by developing a personal leadership philosophy that reflects their individual values and leadership goals. Overall, this course provides students with a foundation to discuss the many factors that frame the ever-present debate of whether leaders are born or made. 3 lecture hours/week.

KINE-1500.Principles of Sport Management
An introduction and analysis of the effective approaches governing the organization and administration of physical activity and sports programs. Areas of study involve management and programming of physical education and sports programs; finances and budgets; equipment and supplies; planning of indoor and outdoor facilities; time management; and public and human relations.

KINE-1650. Functional Anatomy
An in-depth study of the human musculoskeletal system. Emphasis will be placed on the components of skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. Joint articulations will be covered in detail. (3 lecture hours per week; 1 lab hour per week; weekly test)

KINE-1660. Functional Anatomy II
An in-depth study of the structure and function of the human cardiovascular, lymphatic, endocrine, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems, as well as the somatic and special senses. (3 lecture hours per week; 1 lab hour per week; weekly test) (Pre-requisites: KINE-1650)

KINE-1800.Fundamental Mechanics of Human Motion
Presents the quantitative fundamentals of mechanics as they apply to movements of the human body and the sport implements it handles.

KINE-2100. Human Performance
An examination of the role perception and cognition play in our ability to sense, attend to, process, and transmit information during the performance of any motor skill. The course will focus on an information processing approach to examine the processes that underlie our ability to perform motor skills. (3 lecture hours/week).

KINE-2220. Introduction to Leisure
This introductory course examines leisure and leisure delivery in Canada. Various ways of defining leisure are examined, both historically and for different groups of Canadians, as well as the benefits and challenges of leisure in everyday life. The history of leisure delivery in Canada is then reviewed, as well as current approaches and challenges to leisure delivery. (Open to Kinesiology majors only.)

KINE-2240. Introduction to Occupational Biomechanics/Ergonomics
This introductory course will examine topics in occupational biomechanics/ergonomics. The goal of the course will be to provide the tools, skills, and knowledge to perform basic ergonomic assessments. The course will focus on human productivity and risk of injury of specific tissues in the workplace. (Open to Kinesiology majors only.)

KINE-2250.Ethics in Sport and Physical Activity
A philosophical analysis of sport and physical activity with emphasis on ethical aspects. Ethical theories will be studied as a basis for assessing and understanding decisions and actions of coaches, athletes, officials, and executive members. Case studies covering problem areas will be utilized to enable the student to analyze these decisions and actions. (Credit can not be obtained for both KINE-2250 and 95-320)

KINE-2300.Sociology of Sport and Physical Activities
An examination of the relationship between sport and society from a variety of perspectives. This examination will include the interaction of sport with other societal institutions and with various social determinants.

KINE-2400.Historical Perspectives on Physical Activity and Sport in Western Civilization
This introductory course presents an overview of the significance of physical activity and sport in Western Civilization from ancient Greece to the present by specific reference to selected topics in different eras through which the particular society may be examined. Within this framework, the relationship of physical activity and sport to such factors as economics, politics, and religion will be emphasized, as will its contribution to the culture. (3 lecture hours/week).

KINE-2600. Physiology of Human Performance
Discussion of the physiological systems of the human body and the adjustments seen as a result of exercise. General topic areas include examination of how aerobic and anaerobic metabolism operate and respond to energy demands, how the cardiovascular and respiratory systems maintain blood gases and total body perfusion for work, skeletal and smooth muscle function and physiology, neuromuscular function, and how the renal (kidney) and hepatic (liver) systems support work demands, among others. (3 lecture hours/week)

KINE-2690.Measurement and Evaluation
An introduction to descriptive and basic inferential statistical techniques with special emphasis on evaluation of data in the various Kinesiology sub-disciplines. (2 lecture, 2 laboratory hours a week.) (Antirequisite: SOSC-2500.)

KINE-2700.Research Design
A preliminary course to acquaint the student with proper experimental designs and research paper writing. Statistical interpretation and application are included. Current research topics will be included. (2 lecture, 2 laboratory hours a week.)

KINE-2850.Human Growth and Development
A general analysis of the physical, physiological, and psycho-motor development of the individual from conception to adolescence. Special emphasis will be placed on identifying age-appropriate physical activities for children.

KINE-2990.Co-op Work Experience I
Supervised experience in an approved career-related setting with a focus on the application of theory and the development of transferable skills. The co-op work experience is designed to provide students with an enriched learning opportunity to integrate academic theory and concepts in an applied setting. (Prerequisite: Student must be enrolled in a co-operative education program. Offered on a Pass/non-Pass basis. Supervised practicum requires the successful completion of a minimum of 420 hours. Students who do not pass the course cannot continue in the co-op program.)

KINE-3010.The Use and Abuse of Drugs
A concentrated study of the actions and effects of drugs, with special emphasis on the use, abuse, and/or involvement of drugs in today's sporting world.

KINE-3020.Exercise and Fitness Psychology
An examination of the psychological processes by which healthy and unhealthy behaviours related to physical activity develop and the methods by which behavioural change can be encouraged. Emphasis will be placed on exercise, nutrition, and injury as factors in health-related physical fitness.

KINE-3030. Imagery Effects on Performance
This course will be an examination of imagery use in various performance domains (e.g., sport, exercise, rehabilitation, work). Emphasis will be placed on both the theory and research used in the examination of the effects of imagery. (Prerequisites: Open to 3rd and 4th year Kinesiology majors.) (Open to non-majors if there is enrolment space.)

KINE-3040. Sport Nutrition
This course will (1) examine the fundamental concepts of nutritional science applied to health, exercise, and sport, (2) develop an understanding of the relationship between diet and sports performance, and (3) apply sports nutrition principles to exercise science. (3 lecture hours/week).

KINE-3060. Obesity and Eating Disorders
This course will provide a multidisciplinary approach to understanding of the current epidemic of obesity and eating disorders in Canada and its impact on disease development throughout the lifespan. Particular emphasis will be on translating basic science findings related to body weight to intervention and prevention strategies. (Open to Kinesiology students in the Sport Studies and Movement Science streams; open to Kinesiology students in the Sport Management stream provided they have at least 3rd year standing; also open to all other students provided they have at least 3rd year standing and permission of instructor.) (Credit may not be obtained for KINE-3060 and Special Topics courses covering the same content.)

KINE-3100. Motor Learning and Control
An examination of the processes which underlie the acquisition and control of goal directed human movement. Emphasis will be placed on: 1) the factors that affect learning (feedback, attention, memory), 2) the simultaneous integration and coordination of body parts involved in movement execution and control, and 3) review of motor learning and control research. (3 lecture hours/week.)

KINE-3330. Applied Sport Psychology
An examination of the processes by which individual and team athletic performance can be enhanced using mental training techniques based on applications of cognitive and social psychology. Emphasis will focus on individual attentional, anxiety and affect management, and team dynamics.

KINE-3400.History of the Modern Olympic Movement
An examination of the historical development of the Modern Olympic Movement. Areas covered include politics, nationalism, gender, commercialism, marketing, and amateurism. The contributions of various athletes and administrators who have helped to shape Olympic history will also be assessed.

KINE-3450.Sport Marketing
An application of marketing concepts and activities to the sports domain. Topics include product development, promotions, advertising, publicity, pricing, licensing, market segmentation, and research, as well as the development of a marketing plan for a sport/recreation organization. (3 lecture hours/week)

KINE-3500. Organizational Behaviour
This course provides an introduction to human behaviour in the workplace and its influence on organizational effectiveness. This course focuses on the micro (study of individuals in organizations), meso (study of work groups), and macro-levels (study of how organizations behave) of organizational studies. The emphasis is on identifying issues, challenges, and potential solutions, typically encountered by sport organizations at the individual, group, and organizational levels. Through assigned readings, case studies, and lectures, students will gain a balanced perspective of theory and practice relating to how and why people interact within a variety of organizational contexts. (3 lecture hours/week).

KINE-3510.Strategic Planning of Sport Events
A study of the strategies and techniques involved in planning and running various intramural-recreational, extramural, and sport events for different environments in the community. Special emphasis will be given to scheduling; pre-event preparation; management of events; program of activities; personnel involved; and structuring tournaments and competitions.

KINE-3520. Sport Finance
Introduction to basic theory in finance, budgeting, and accounting applied to the management of sport organizations. Topics may broadly include: financial issues in sport, financial systems and how they operate, types of business structures, basic accounting principles, capital structuring and other sources of revenue, principles of budgeting, taxation, financial ratio analysis, break-even analysis, time value of money, and various other financial concepts as applicable (3 lecture hours/week.)

KINE-3550. Socio-Economic Aspects of Sport and Leisure
An introduction to the interaction of sport and economics. A socio-economic approach is taken to examine such topics as the demand for sport and leisure activities, and sport consumer behaviour.

KINE-3600. Physiology of Exercise and Respiration
This course explores the physiology of breathing at rest, during exercise, and in disease. This course also examines the interaction of metabolism, ventilation, and kidney function during rest/exercise. Physiologic challenges, in particular acid-base balance at sea level and altitude, are explored.(3 lecture hours/week.)

KINE-3610. Musculoskeletal Physiology
Adaptability and function of components of the musculoskeletal (MSK) system (skeletal muscle and motor neurons, connective tissue, bone) will be examined in detail. Properties of tissues will be illustrated by examining: 1) cell types found in MSK tissues including stem cell populations, 2) cell signaling and gene expression responses to various exercise stimuli (resistance and endurance training), and 3) selected aspects of fatigue and responses to injury and disease.

KINE-3620.Human Factors and Performance
This course provides a foundational experience regarding the effects of human factors on performance in work and non-work environments. Human performance will be explored as a function of a variety of factors which may include: how we process, store, and attend to information; the design of products, spaces and processes; how we communicate information and interface with displays and controls; environmental factors such as lighting, sound, and temperature; and how our work and daily lives are scheduled.

KINE-3630. Cognitive Ergonomics
Human cognition and perception shape our interaction with the surrounding world and influence the way we use objects and tools in the workplace. While ergonomics focuses on the physical element involved in human-machine interaction, this course will concentrate on discovering how cognition and perception affect the way we perceive objects, process relevant information, and produce adequate responses. This course will also address how cognition and perception can be measured when assessing and developing effective human-machine interactions. (3 lecture hours/week.)

KINE-3700.Scientific Basis of Conditioning
A study of current concepts in conditioning theories and physiological evaluation. Included in this course are assessment techniques, program design, and other factors affecting physical performance. (2 lecture, 2 laboratory hours a week.)

PRACTICE THEORY AND ANALYSIS COURSES (KINE-3810-KINE-3980)
*NOTE: Enrolment in Practice, Theory, and Analysis courses (listed below as KINE-3810 through KINE-3980) are restricted to third- and fourth-year Kinesiology majors, with Semester 7 and 8 majors being given preference up to any enrolment limit. Space permitting, non-Kinesiology students may take these courses with permission of the instructor.

KINE-3810.Practice, Theory, and Analysis of Urban Outdoor Recreation
Utilizing sociological, historical, and philosophical viewpoints this course examines the concept of wilderness, specifically within an urban setting. Using Essex County as the "urban setting," students will explore the breadth of possible recreation activities available and consider their relevance to a broader understanding of recreation, wilderness, and ourselves. (2 lecture, 2 laboratory hours a week.)

KINE-3820.Practice, Theory, and Analysis of Golf
Combining physical and analytical techniques this course will assist students to understand and execute golf skills, enhance their abilities in error detection and correction, understand strategy and course management, and be aware and appreciative of golf rules and etiquette. (Additional fee applies.) (2 lecture, 2 laboratory hours a week.)

KINE-3830.Practice, Theory, and Analysis of Hockey
Combining physical and analytical techniques this course will assist students to understand and execute hockey skills, enhance their abilities in error detection and correction, and understand and apply the strategies to the offensive, neutral, and defensive zones. (Additional fee applies.) (2 lecture, 2 laboratory hours a week.)

KINE-3880.Practice, Theory, and Analysis in Football
The performance of selected football skills with a special emphasis on an applied mechanical analysis. Also involved will be an indepth study of modern offensive and defensive teams and the kicking game. Other areas of study will concentrate on scouting practices and practice planning principles. (2 lecture, 2 laboratory hours a week.)

KINE-3920.Practice, Theory, and Analysis of Basketball
This course combines improvement of individual offensive and defensive skills, application of mental and physical training principles by which basketball performance can be enhanced, rules of the game, and awareness of strategic concepts by which individuals and teams compete. (2 lecture, 2 laboratory hours a week.)

KINE-3940.Practice, Theory, and Analysis of Volleyball
Combining physical performance and analytical techniques, this course will assist students in the understanding of skill execution for each of the components of volleyball, enhance their ability to identify and correct errors in execution of skills, and apply the skills to the offensive and defensive strategies of the game. (2 lecture, 2 laboratory hours a week.)

KINE-3950.Practice, Theory, and Analysis of Aquatics
This course introduces students to the main components of aquatics. It will assist them in understanding the basic execution of the various swimming stroke. Students will develop their ability to identify and correct errors in the execution of swimming skills, plus be introduced to the basic aspects of water safety and lifesaving skills. (2 lecture, 2 laboratory hours a week.)

KINE-3970.Practice, Theory, and Analysis of Track and Field
This course introduces students to the science of track and field. They will be introduced to all track and field events and the progressions associated with each event. Students will be expected to illustrate basic movements for each event and analyze skill movements for all track and field events. (2 lecture, 2 laboratory hours a week.)

KINE-3980.Practice, Theory, and Analysis of Physical Fitness
This course introduces students to the main components of fitness instruction. Anatomy, exercise physiology, program design, leadership, and safety will be reviewed with direct application to fitness instruction. Students will have the opportunity to develop the ability to apply theoretical information to practical exercise experiences. (2 lecture, 2 laboratory hours a week.)

KINE-3990.Co-op Work Experience II
Supervised experience in an approved career-related setting with a focus on the application of theory and the development of transferable skills. The co-op work experience is designed to provide students with an enriched learning opportunity to integrate academic theory and concepts in an applied setting. (Prerequisite: Student must be enrolled in a cooperative education program. Offered on a Pass/non-Pass basis. Supervised practicum requires the successful completion of a minimum of 420 hours. Students who do not pass the course cannot continue in the co-op program.)

KINE-4000.Human Movement and Aging
An examination of the physiological, sensory, muscular, and cardiorespiratory mechanisms underlying age-related changes in human movement and motor control. These issues will be explored from cellular to whole-body perspectives incorporating current theoretical approaches to aging. Emphasis will be placed on integrating the role of physical activity into explaining age-related changes in cognition and activities of daily living.

KINE-4020. Sport Tourism
Sport tourism is one of the largest and most important segments of the travel and tourism industry. With a focus on the global sports environment, this course will introduce students to the fundamentals of sport tourism, including the creation, impacts, and future trends of sport tourism development. Students will critically examine the economic, socio-cultural, and environmental impacts of sport tourism as well as the motivations of sport tourists. Finally, this course will instruct students on marketing and development principles of sport tourism products and services. (Prerequisite: Open to Kinesiology students in the Sport Management stream; open to Kinesiology students in the Sport Studies and Movement Science streams provided they have at least 3rd year standing; also open to all other students provided they have at least 3rd year standing and permission of instructor)

KINE-4040. Population Health
This course will examine the factors that aim to (1) improve health of the entire population and (2) reduce health inequalities among population groups. Particular emphasis will be on the Canadian health care system and the determinants of health, in addition to personal health practices and health knowledge, health policy, and behaviour change theory as it applies to the health of our society. (Prerequisite: Open to Kinesiology students in the Sport Studies stream; open to Kinesiology students in the Movement Science and Sport Management streams provided they have at least 3rd year standing; also open to all other students provided they have at least 3rd year standing and permission of instructor) (Credit may not be obtained for KINE-3040 and Special Topics courses covering the same content.)

KINE-4050.Gender Issues in Sport
A comprehensive overview of the status of women in sport with a view towards understanding the influence of gender upon women and men as consumers of sport in North American culture.

KINE-4080. Dynamics of Skill Acquisition
This course will introduce students to the theoretical and empirical data underlying dynamic systems “theory”. Specifically, it will examine the notion of “self-organization”; individual and environmental constraints on action and the evolution of skilled motor behaviour; and discuss practical applications of this theory to normal and pathological motor activity. (Prerequisite: Open to Kinesiology students in the Movement Science and Sport Studies streams; open to Kinesiology students in the Sport Management stream provided they have at least 3rd year standing; also open to all other students provided they have at least 3rd year standing and permission of instructor)

KINE-4100.Physical Activity for Special Populations
An examination of populations that have special needs in the area of physical activity (sensory, cognitive, musculo-skeletal impairment). Emphasis will be placed on defining the characteristics of the population, the needs and strengths of each population, and matching the strengths with the appropriate physical activities. Issues of integration, programming, and environmental adaptation will also be considered. Laboratory experiences will focus on the application of the theoretical information. (2 lecture, 2 laboratory hours a week.)

KINE-4330. Selected Topics in Sport Leadership
The course examines sport leadership from a variety of theoretical perspectives that include both interpersonal and intrapersonal perspectives. The course will expose you to current research and literature relating to leadership in sport. The course will examine the role of the sport leader and how to become an effective sport leader. Students will develop specific leadership skills that are of interest to them and practice these skills in exercises and class projects. The emphasis will be on applying psychological concepts to your sport leadership experiences. (Prerequisites: Open to 3rd and 4th year Kinesiology majors and students in the Certificate in Sport Media, Communication and Social Issues.) (Open to non-majors if there is enrolment space.)

KINE-4400. History of Sport in Canada
An examination of the issues and topics related to the historical evolution of sport in Canada. Areas of study include methodology, social class, geography, immigration, native sport, urbanization, industrialization, religion, gender, economics, and government involvement.

KINE-4500. Human Resources in Sport Management
An introduction to the tools and systems available for effective decision-making in sport organizations. Topics include sport planning, employee selection and evaluation, time management, compensation, benefits, labour relations, career planning, and problem solving.

KINE-4510. Sport and the Law
Introduces students to the principles of law as they relate to Human Kinetics. The principles of law will be related to sport or athletic administration, and to instruction and supervision as it relates to physical and health education and field activities, interscholastic and intercollegiate programs, as well as, other recreational and leisure pursuits.

KINE-4520. Sport and Government
An analysis of national and international sport in the context of government involvement at the provincial and national levels.

KINE-4530. Perceptual-Motor Development
This course examines motor skill development of children and adolescents, bringing together theoretical perspectives from psychology, biology, genetics,neuroscience, and sociology. An interdisciplinary perspective is used to study the interaction of developmental processes. The emergence, development, and assessment of selected perceptual-motor skills will be examined in detail. (3 hours a week.)

KINE-4550. Global Issues in Sport Management
This course provides future leaders and managers with strategies to address globalization issues in the field of sport management. The course uncovers how the social, political, cultural, economic, and technological dimensions in the global context affect the management practices of leaders in sport and leisure organizations. It will also cover how sport (developmental sport and high performance sport) is organized in different countries. Topics such as commercialization and internationalization of sport will be addressed, as well as the increasing political involvement in sport, the global media-sport complex, the migration of athletes, and the global business of sport. (Pre-requisite: Open to Kinesiology Majors and students in the Certificate in Sport Media, Communication and Social Issues.)

KINE-4560. Sport Communication
This course provides a comprehensive survey of the practices and techniques used for effective communication in the sport industry. Topics covered will include the development and delivery of an effective campaign, the use of mass and social media, crisis management, and public relations.

KINE-4570. Hockey in Canada
Starting with the nineteenth century and the origins of the game, this course moves forward chronologically and thematically through the game’s evolution, paying special attention to matters of national identity, business and labour, leisure, race and ethnicity, gender, rural-urban issues, international affairs, and religion. This course uses hockey to gain a new, perhaps more personal, understanding of Canada’s past and present.

KINE-4580. The Endocrine System in Sport, Exercise and Health
The endocrine system, in close association with the nervous system, is an important regulator of physiological homeostasis. Various components of the “milieu interieur” or internal environment must be maintained for a “free and independent life”. Exercise induces several metabolic and physiological challenges to which the endocrine system must respond in order to maintain this internal environment. Thus, this course will introduce students to the mammalian endocrine system and then examine how exercise and health affect and are affected by the endogenous hormones and chemical messengers of the human body. (Prerequisite: Open to Kinesiology students in the Movement Science stream; open to Kinesiology students in the Sport Studies and Sport Management streams provided they have at least 3rd year standing; also open to all other students provided they have at least 3rd year standing and permission of instructor)

KINE-4590. Sport Media
The focus of this course is to examine sport with more critical awareness by exploring the lens through which athletics is brought to and consumed by fans. We will look at conventional sport media coverage as well as sport representation in various other forms of media (e.g. novels, movies, music, documentaries, advertisements, social media etc) in order to challenge preconceived notions, uncover biases and comprehend the complicated social fabric of which sport is part.

KINE-4600.Cardiovascular Physiology
The study of the cardiovascular system, anatomy, electrophysiology, mechanics, and responses to stressors. (2 lecture, 2 laboratory hours a week.)

KINE-4610. Chronic Disease and Exercise Rehabilitation
This course is designed to provide a broad understanding of: 1) the physiological processes involved in the development of selected chronic diseases (e.g., cardiovascular, respiratory, cancer, autoimmune) and disorders (e.g., Huntington’s disease), 2) the risk factors associated with their development and progression, where applicable, and 3) how exercise rehabilitation can be used as a tool for intervention, including past, current and emerging exercise recommendations. (Prerequisites: Open to 3rd and 4th year Kinesiology majors.) (Open to non-majors if there is enrolment space.)

KINE-4620. Exercise in Extreme Environments
Humans are a remarkably resilient species in the face of widely varying environmental conditions. In fact, humans inhabit nearly every corner of the earth (and beyond) and manage to survive and work in the extremes of cold, heat, pollution, atmospheric and water pressures, and even extreme g-forces and microgravity. The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the physiological responses to exercise (including work or play) under extreme environmental conditions and some of the countermeasures, both physiological and outside the body (e.g., clothing) humans use to protect ourselves in these environments. (Prerequisites: Open to 3rd and 4th year Kinesiology majors.) (Open to non-majors if there is enrolment space.)

KINE-4630.Applied Neurophysiology
Mechanisms underlying human movement in healthy, diseased, aged and trained states will be examined by studying the integrated actions of the neural, somatosensory and motor systems. Emphasis will be placed upon sensory transduction, reflexes and the descending motor system.

KINE-4640. The Pathophysiology of Pain
Pain is a phenomenon encountered in many of the sub-disciplines of kinesiology. This course is designed to give students an awareness of the functional significance of pain. This course will focus on the physiology and anatomy of pain from nerve endings in peripheral tissue to synaptic transmission in the central nervous system. Factors that affect pain perception, including pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment modalities and psychological aspects of pain, will also be discussed. (Open to Kinesiology majors only.)

KINE-4650.Ergonomics and Injury-Prevention
Examination of topics in applied ergonomics as they pertain to reducing the risk of musculoskeletal injuries in the workplace. Students will gain practical experience in applying quantitative and qualitative ergonomic assessment tools. Topics include: the mechanisms of upper limb and low back injuries, the principles of redesigning operations to reduce injury risk, and techniques for optimizing the feasibility that ergonomic changes will be implemented. Includes experience in an occupational setting. (2 lecture, 2 laboratory hours a week.)

KINE-4660. Cardiac Rehabilitation
This course introduces the pathophysiological mechanisms associated with the development and progression of cardiovascular disease, namely atherosclerotic heart disease, and emphasizes its global burden. It also highlights the positive effects of Cardiac Rehabilitation on quality of life, morbidity and mortality outcomes, delivering insight into the paradigm shift toward personal responsibility for chronic disease management/secondary prevention to maximize cardiovascular health across the lifespan, and offers students an opportunity to hone leadership and communications skills via group discussions and presentations. Cardiac Rehabilitation-related career opportunities will be explored. (3 lecture hours/week.)

KINE-4710.Physiological Basis of Sports Therapy
A physiological examination of athletic injuries and their therapy. Topics to include the prevention of and pathology of injuries, as well as the care of injuries and rehabilitation techniques. (Additional laboratory fee applies.) (2 lecture, 2 laboratory hours a week.)

KINE-4730. The Social Construction of Leisure
An examination of leisure as a social activity which is shaped by various societal institutions and social relations.

KINE-4750. Individual Studies
The student will select an approved topic and under direction investigate and report on it. (Prerequisite: consent of the instructor is required at least three weeks prior to the end of the Fall or Winter term preceding the term in which enrollment is anticipated.) (Hours to be arranged.)

KINE-4760. Principles of Coaching
A critical study of various issues that confront the modern-day coach. Areas of study involve effective coaching techniques; person attributes; motivation and discipline approaches; dealing with problem athletes; and coach-player communication. Stress will be placed upon developing a sound beginning philosophy of coaching, along with looking at the coach as a professional person.

KINE-4770. Outdoor Recreation
Through guided discovery and experiential learning, this course provides knowledge about the outdoors as an alternative recreational medium that fosters deeper awareness of nature, wilderness, and ourselves. Offered in the Fall term before the start of classes. (Prerequisite: demonstrated swimming competence.) (Additional fee applies.)

KINE-4780. Undergraduate Thesis
The Undergraduate Thesis course provides undergraduate students with an opportunity to conduct a full year independent research project under the supervision of a faculty member, culminating in a written thesis. Students enrolled in the course will attend regular meetings throughout the fall and winter terms with their faculty supervisor. Components of the course will include: (a) establishing research questions and design; (b) research proposal document; (c) data collection and analysis; and (d) written and oral presentation of the outcomes of the research project. (Students will normally be in the final year of their degree and in Good Academic Standing. Approval of the supervising faculty member and Thesis Coordinator is required. Students who have already taken two (2) Individual Studies courses (KINE-4750), are not eligible for this course. )

KINE 4800. Advanced Biomechanics
This course introduces students to advanced concepts and techniques required in the quantitative biomechanical analysis of human movement. (Open to non-Kinesiology majors with permission from instructor).

KINE-4850. Group Dynamics in Sport
The central purpose of this course is to explore individual human behavior in a sport and physical activity context from a group dynamics perspective. Emphasis will be placed on understanding group-based psychological concepts which are pertinent to the field of sport and physical activity.

KINE-4880. Special Topics in Practice, Theory and Analysis of Sport
This is a course in which current topics in the field of Practice, Theory and Analysis of Sport are examined.

KINE-4890. Special Topics in Sport Management
This is a course in which current topics in the field Sport Management are examined.

KINE-4900. Special Topics in Movement Science
Courses in which current topics associated with Movement Science are examined.

KINE-4910. Laboratory experiences in Biomechanics and Ergonomics
This advanced laboratory course will provide students the opportunity to become familiar with operating common laboratory equipment used in the field of biomechanics and ergonomics. Practical experiences will include anthropometry measurements, force platform data acquisition, gait analysis, video analysis and the use of manual digitizing software, linear and angular kinetics/kinematics analysis, biomechanical model analysis, electromyography, and the use of Microsoft Excel. Students will also have the opportunity to develop the skills required to assess and modify common office and industrial environments, workstations and hand tools found in the workplace to minimize musculoskeletal demands and help prevent injuries in the workplace. (Prerequisites: Completion of all required first and second year Kinesiology courses. Open only to Movement Science Majors.)

KINE-4920. Laboratory Experiences in Human and Exercise Physiology
This advanced laboratory course will provide students the opportunity to become familiar with operating common laboratory equipment used in the field of human and exercise physiology. Practical experiences will include performing health related fitness appraisals involving screening tools, flexibility assessments, body composition measurements, heart rate and blood pressure measurements, electrocardiogram and blood lactate analysis, aerobic and anaerobic musculoskeletal fitness assessments and fitness program prescriptions, and the use of Microsoft Excel. (Prerequisites: Completion of all required first and second year Kinesiology courses. Open only to Movement Science Majors.)

KINE-4930. Laboratory Experiences in Motor Learning and Psychology of Physical Activity
This advanced laboratory course will provide students the opportunity to become familiar with operating common laboratory equipment in the field of motor learning and the psychology of physical activity. Practical experiences will include the use of evaluation tools/checklists used to assess motor control, motor learning and sport psychology, applying both classical and recent methodological protocols, collecting common measurement variables and evaluating personal results. Students will also examine reaction and movement time, Fitts’ Law, practice, balance, and movement planning; as well as the effects of anxiety on sport performance, the use of imagery during sport performance, interviewing skills and evaluation techniques, and the use of Microsoft Excel. (Prerequisites: Completion of all required first and second year Kinesiology courses. Open only to Movement Science Majors.)

KINE-4980. Internship
A supervised, project-driven work experience in an approved setting. The experience will be expected to provide students with an enriched learning opportunity to integrate theory and practice. Internships are open to 4th year Kinesiology students from either major. (Offered on a Pass/Non-Pass basis.) (Prerequisite: consent of the instructor is required at least three weeks prior to the end of the Fall or Winter term preceding the term in which enrollment is anticipated.) (9 hours a week.)

KINE-4990. Co-op Work Experience III
Supervised experience in an approved career-related setting with a focus on the application of theory and the development of transferable skills. The co-op work experience is designed to provide students with an enriched learning opportunity to integrate academic theory and concepts in an applied setting. (Prerequisite: Student must be enrolled in a co-operative education program. Offered on a Pass/non-Pass basis. Supervised practicum requires the successful completion of a minimum of 420 hours. Students who do not pass the course cannot continue in the co-op program.)