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Undergraduate Calendar
Winter 2019

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FACULTY OF ENGINEERING: GENERAL COURSES

GENERAL ENGINEERING

85-111. Engineering Mechanics I
Statics of particles and rigid bodies; trusses, frames, machines; centroids and centres of gravity; friction. (3 lecture, 2 tutorial hours a week.)

85-118. Engineering and the Profession
The Engineering and the Profession course is an introductory professional course for all Engineering students. The students will be introduced to and learn about various professional and academic topics, and may include but are not limited to: differences and similarities between the various engineering disciplines; academic performance, expectations, and procedures; strategies for academic success; extracurricular student opportunities; important career development issues; academic integrity and ethical considerations; sustainability considerations; and public health and safety responsibilities; and how engineering is broadly related to our society. The fundamentals of technical communications will be introduced, focusing on common technical writing needs, such as grammar, formatting, and style, as well as basic writing forms, such as memos and short documents. Additional topics may include the basics of common engineering measurements, technical principles and approaches, business and legal practices. (3 lectures hours a week.)

85-119. Technical Communications
The Technical Communications course focuses on teaching Engineering students effective oral and written communication techniques and approaches to improve their clarity and comprehensiveness when communicating to a variety of audiences. The topics covered may include but are not limited to: graphical communications, informative presentations; persuasive presentations; the use of visual aids for conveying technical/engineering information when speaking; resumes and job search communications; technical writing styles and formatting; information gathering and analysis; literature research techniques; topic development; summaries and abstracts; the use of visual tools such as graphs, figures, and tables; research documentation and referencing; developing and documenting instructions and procedures; proposals and technical reports. Ethical and legal issues in communications, such as plagiarism, will also be covered. Topics for discussion, assignments, and skills development activities may include issues and aspects taught in 85-118 or other relevant subjects. In addition, students will continue to receive periodic communications relevant to their academic and professional development.

85-120. Engineering Thermofluids
Introductory thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, and heat transfer. Terminology and units; sources of and types of energy and their interchange; types of fluid flow and heat transfer; physical and thermal properties of fluids. Solution of basic problems using laws of thermofluids; exploration of common thermofluid systems. Includes demonstrations and laboratory-based experiments. (Prior knowledge from 85-111 or 64-140 is recommended.) (3 lecture, 2 tutorial/laboratory hours per week)

85-133. Engineering and Design
Introductory engineering design course. Visualization techniques, graphical communication using sketching, isometric drawings, orthographic projection, section views, auxiliary views and descriptive geometry. Drafting portfolio. Design portfolio consisting of open-ended problems: problem identification and formulation; analysis of the problem; problem solving techniques; graphical communication of the solution. Includes group work to develop personal, teamwork, leadership, and task completion skills. (3 lecture, 3 laboratory hours a week.)

85-198. Work Term
Supervised experience in an approved career-related setting with a focus on the application of theory and the development of transferable skills. The co-op work experience is designed to provide students with an enriched learning opportunity to integrate academic theory and concepts in an applied setting. (Prerequisite: Student must be enrolled in a co-operative education program. Offered on a Pass/non-Pass basis. Supervised practicum requires the successful completion of a minimum of 420 hours. Students who do not pass the course may not be allowed to remain in the co-op program.)

85-212. Thermodynamics
An introductory thermodynamics course in which fundamental principles are developed. Included are ideal gas relations, properties of pure substances, First Law for closed and steady flow systems, the Second Law with entropy relations, and an introduction to cycles. (3 lecture, 1.5 tutorial hours a week.) (Prerequisite: 85-120)

85-218. Mechanics of Deformable Bodies
Introduction to stress, strain, stress-strain relations, and mechanical. A study of simple structures subjected to either axial load, flexure, and torsion, including flexure of beams, eccentric loads, shear and bending moment diagrams, shearing streses in beams. Additional topics may include statically indeterminate problems. (Prerequisites: 85-111 and 62-140.) (3 lecture, 3 laboratory/tutorial hours per week.)

85-219. Engineering Materials Fundamentals
This course explains how the properties of solid materials are derived and are related to their basic crystallographic and electronic structures: Metals, ceramics, polymers, and electronic materials are covered. (3 lecture, 2 laboratory or tutorial hours a week.)

85-220. Numerical Analysis for Engineering
Application of numerical methods to real-world engineering problems. Development of mathematical background for numerical techniques. Root finding; numerical linear algebra; curve fitting; numerical quadrature; numerical solution to ordinary differential equations. (Prerequisite: 85-232.) (3 lecture, 2 laboratory or tutorial hours a week.)

85-222. Engineering Treatment of Experimental Data
Treatment of engineering data using the concepts of frequency distribution; measures of central tendency and dispersion. Probability; random variables; discrete and continuous distributions. Tests of hypotheses; estimation; goodness-of-fit test; linear regression and correlation. Applications using computers in engineering design problems, quality control, and manufacturing processes. (Prerequisite: 62-140.) (3 lecture hours, 1 tutorial hour a week.)

85-230. Advanced Engineering and Design
Computer aided design applications for engineering graphic communication. Solid modeling; orthographic projection and isometric drawing; sections and conventions; dimensioning and tolerancing. Design portfolio and project. (Prerequisite: 85-133) (4 lecture/laboratory hours a week.) (Credit cannot be obtained for both 85-130 and 85-230.)

85-232. Engineering Software Fundamentals
Fundamental engineering problems and the application of digital computers to analyze these problems. Introduction to additional programming languages and computing concepts, and emphasizing the use of MATLAB in engineering computations (2 lecture, 2 tutorial hours a week.) (Credit cannot be obtained for both 85-232 and 85-132.)

85-233. Fluid Mechanics I
Fluid properties and basic concepts, fluid statics, equations of motion, one dimensional flows, flows in pipes in series, parallel and networks, dimensional analysis and similitude. (3 lecture hours, 1 tutorial hour a week.) (Prerequisite: 85-120)

85-234. Electrical and Computing Fundamentals
Electric charge, electric fields and potentials; conduction, resistivity, circuit variables, ideal sources and components; diodes; simple resistive circuits; techniques of circuit analysis, mesh and node analysis; network theorems, Thevenin and Norton theorems; source transformations; operational amplifiers, circuits, analysis and applications; inductance, capacitance; computer-oriented solution methods using SPICE and MATLAB. This course is for non-electrical engineering students. (3 lecture, 2.0 laboratory/tutorial hours or equivalent a week.) (Credit cannot be obtained for both 85-234 and 88-124 or 85-234 and 85-124.)
[Note as of Winter 2012: Credit cannot be obtained for both 85-234 and 85/88-124 or 85-234 and 85/88-214]

85-250. Engineering and the Environment
Introduction to: pollutants, natural cycles, natural energy use, human population and consumption, common environmental problems, effects on human health. Dimensions of environmental contamination and flow. Pollution Prevention: waste audits, mass balances (open and closed systems, with and without chemical change), waste reduction, industrial ecology, and design for the environment. Conversion of energy and efficiency. Energy: world consumption, sources and their potential, environmental effects. Occupational health and safety. Environmental legislation. Sustainability. (Prerequisite: 59-110.) (3 lecture, 2 laboratory/tutorial hours or equivalent a week.)

85-298. Work Term I
Supervised experience in an approved career-related setting with a focus on the application of theory and the development of transferable skills. The co-op work experience is designed to provide students with an enriched learning opportunity to integrate academic theory and concepts in an applied setting. (Prerequisite: Student must be enrolled in a co-operative education program. Offered on a Pass/non-Pass basis. Supervised practicum requires the successful completion of a minimum of 420 hours. Students who do not pass the course may not be allowed to remain in the co-op program.)

85-313. Engineering Economics
Cost estimation, cost accounting, and cost control. Comparison of engineering alternatives by annual cost, present worth, and rate of return methods. Depreciation and taxes. Equipment replacement. (3 lecture, 1.5 tutorial hours a week.)

85-330. Applied Engineering Mathematics
This course will cover first-order ordinary differential equations (ODEs), higher-order ODEs with constant coefficients, Cauchy-Euler equations, systems of linear ODEs, Laplace transforms, and applications to science and engineering. Application of ODE for analyzing the first, second, and higher order RLC electrical circuits will be studied. Mechanicals system analysis using ODE will be considered as another application. The rest of the course will cover complex numbers and applications in engineering. Specifically, phasor concept and analyzing of the steady state solution of electrical systems is considered as the main application. Then the frequency response will be introduced as the most important application.

85-340. Mechatronic System Design and Project
This course will introduce concepts to integrate mechatronic components such as mechanical, electronic, optical and computer programming. Basic concepts and fundamental principles in mechatronic system-based design for automation, packaging and other applications will be reviewed. Students will develop the knowledge and skills necessary to adopt an interdisciplinary approach to mechatronic system design. The hands-on laboratory activities will assist in developing the skills in designing and troubleshooting integrated mechatronic systems. Students will be organized into teams of three or four students, and each team will be proposing, conceptualizing, designing, building and demonstrating a significant hands-on mechatronic project. Through this course and team project the students will be prepared for the final Capstone Mechatronics.

85-350. Signals and Systems Analysis
Discrete and Continuous-Time Signals and Systems, Discrete and Continuous-Time Linear Time-Invariant Systems, System Analysis in Time Domain, System Analysis in Frequency Domain, Convolution, Differential Equation Models, Fourier series, the Fourier Transform, the Laplace Transform and it's Applications, Sampling of Systems.

85-398. Work Term II
Supervised experience in an approved career-related setting with a focus on the application of theory and the development of transferable skills. The co-op work experience is designed to provide students with an enriched learning opportunity to integrate academic theory and concepts in an applied setting. (Prerequisite: Student must be enrolled in a co-operative education program. Offered on a Pass/non-Pass basis. Supervised practicum requires the successful completion of a minimum of 420 hours. Students who do not pass the course may not be allowed to remain in the co-op program.)


85-421. Engineering and Society
The technology-society relationship in a historical context; the nature of technological change and its consequences; the engineer's role in the control of technology and sustainable development; the responsibility of engineers for health and safety in the workplace, including OHSA, WHMIS. The development of the engineering profession; professional registration and the code of ethics; the duties and responsibilities of engineers; the engineer and the law. (Restricted to fourth-year students.) (3 lecture hours a week.)

85-430. Intelligent and Digital Manufacturing
Manufacturing methods are shifting towards smart tools that are adaptive and self-aware. This course will introduce concepts and components for intelligent machining tools and interfacing them with digital manufacturing that will create the knowledge of Industry 4.0. Integration of smart sensors and controls, data processing, interconnected machines, digital link between design and production, analysis of manufacturing processes and supply chains will be discussed.

85-440. Energy Conversion Systems
This course covers the fundamental principles of energy conservation processes. Design analysis, and construction of modern electromechanical systems, mechanical transmission systems, measurement of mechanical motion, and implementation of electromechanical coupling. DC and AC machinery fundamentals, electromechanical energy conversion, synchronous and induction motors, motion and controls of electromechanical systems will be discussed. Hands-on lab with modelling and simulation of multi-domain electromechanical systems. The course also introduces the use of modern energy conversion systems which may include conventional combustion based and Rankine power systems, energy systems for space applications, Autonomous vehicle applications, solar, wind, wave, thermoelectric, and geothermal energy systems.

85-450. Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning
This course is an introduction to the area of Artificial Intelligence and designing intelligent machines. Artificial intelligence aims to understand thinking and intelligence in ways that enable the construction of computer systems that are able to reason in uncertain environments. Work in AI has supported the development of driverless cars and house-cleaning robots as well as systems that have defeated world chess champions and planned space explorations.
The course has three core sections: search, representation, and uncertainty. Each section will provide a thorough understanding of major approaches, representational techniques and core algorithms. Students completing this course will have an in-depth understanding of three core areas of AI and the connections among them, and with such other key AI areas as machine learning, robotics, natural language processing and multi-agent systems.

85-460. Introduction to Robotics
This course is an introduction to robotics modeling, dynamics, and control of robotic manipulators and industrial motion control. Students study Kinematics and Dynamics of Machines and will be exposed to principles of the geometry of motion, Uniform and non-uniform motion, linkage, gears, cams. Students will be exposed to the operation, programming and applications of a typical industrial robot using the actual and simulation tools. Hands-on activities will include manual teach programming, testing with simulation software and programming of advance movements.

85-480. Capstone Mechatronics
A team-based Mechatronics Capstone Project will integrate and realize all the technical skills and hands-on experience the students have acquired throughout their program. Students will be organized into teams of three or four students, each team will be proposing, conceptualizing, designing, building and demonstrating a significant hands-on mechatronic project. Skills deployed during this project include: creative thinking, engineering design, documentation and implementation, team work, presentation, engineering standards and entrepreneurship.

85-483. Engineering Report
The course prepares the students to present a problem, an observation, or idea, and to analyze it logically and draw conclusions or make recommendations. The course content includes acceptable technical content involving engineering analysis, design, development, or research. The course outcome includes generating a report to demonstrate a satisfactory level of writing and graphical skills, thus the quality of the presentation will be a factor in determining the acceptability of the report. The final report should be about 5,000 words long, or 25 double-spaced typewritten pages not including tables and graphs, and includes a signed statement that it was written by the candidate. (Open to BEngTech Majors)

85-498. Work Term III
Supervised experience in an approved career-related setting with a focus on the application of theory and the development of transferable skills. The co-op work experience is designed to provide students with an enriched learning opportunity to integrate academic theory and concepts in an applied setting. (Prerequisite: Student must be enrolled in a co-operative education program. Offered on a Pass/non-Pass basis. Supervised practicum requires the successful completion of a minimum of 420 hours. Students who do not pass the course may not be allowed to remain in the co-op program.)