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Undergraduate Calendar
Fall 2017

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LANGUAGES, LITERATURES AND CULTURES/LANGUES, LITTÉRATURES ET CULTURES (LLC): COURSES


JEWISH STUDIES

06-110. Hebrew for Beginners I
A brief introduction to the Semitic languages of which Hebrew is a prominent member, including a survey of the main epochs of the Hebrew language such as Biblical Hebrew, the Hebrew of medieval Spain, the renaissance of Hebrew in the 19th century and modern Hebrew. Elements of the language to be covered include the printed alphabet, the roots of Hebrew words, basic vocabulary and the structures of sentences. Assignments will include writing basic words and reading elementary texts. No previous knowledge of Hebrew is required.

06-111. Hebrew for Beginners II
This course is a continuation of 06-110. Included are additional roots of Hebrew words, increased vocabulary including the tenses of words, more complex sentence structures, reading more advanced texts and writing basic sentences. (prerequisite: 06-110)

06-120. Introduction to Jewish Civilization
This course will introduce basic Jewish thought and practices focussing on Jewish religious and cultural traditions from its earliest beginnings through the dramatic events of the last century. The course will examine Jewish perspectives on God, Torah, prayer, the afterlife, the Jewish life cycle, the holiday cycle of the Jewish year and Jewish identity.

06-170. Introduction to Diaspora Studies: There's No Place Like Home
This course introduces students to diasporas-scattered populations living in exile from their ancestral homelands. The course focuses on the significance of migration, exile, belonging, and nostalgia (for ancestral homelands) for diasporas throughout the world. Students submit projects (incorporating oral histories, for example) on the diaspora of their choice. (Also offered as Diaspora Studies 35-170 and Political Science 45-170)

06-220. Jewish Mysticism
The purpose of this course is to understand Jewish spirituality and mystical experience through various mystical traditions including Spanish Kabbalah, Lurianic Kabbalah, the Sabbatean heresy and Polish Hasidism.

06-230. Hebrew Bible: Text and Meaning
Because of the centrality of the Bible to Jewish thought, it has been the subject of many important commentaries by Rabbis over the centuries. These commentaries, known in Hebrew as Midrash, attempt to understand not only the literal meaning of the text but also to understand its deeper meaning in terms of morals and values, mystical insights and allegorical interpretations. Disciplines such as psychology, archaeology, literary analysis and anthropology are used to gain a better understanding of the text.

06-235. To Auschwitz and Beyond: Reflections on the Meaning of the Holocaust
An examination of responses to key issues raised by the Holocaust as reflected in postwar culture both in Canada and abroad.

06-270 The Jewish Diaspora: Ancient to Modern
This course will acquaint students with the Jewish Diaspora over the centuries. The existence of the Jewish people as a dispersed people is central to understanding their diversity, shared identity and aspirations. Various major migrations and individual Jewish communities will be examined. (Also offered as Diaspora Studies 35-270)

06-370. Jews and the Modern World
This course will examine Judaism through the prism of modern intellectual and social movements which Jews have embraced and of which they often have been leaders. These include liberalism, socialism, capitalism, feminism and Zionism. Jewish contributions to the rise of the social sciences also will be examined.

ARABIC STUDIES

08-110. Introduction to Arabic I
Introduces vocabulary and the basic elements of Arabic language structure. Students will acquire a basic level of expertise in the four communication skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. (Only for students with no prior knowledge of Arabic. Students may not obtain credit for this course and the former 07-110)

08-111. Introduction to Arabic II

This course is the continuation of “Introduction to Arabic I”. It is designed to increase vocabulary, enhance knowledge of the elements of Arabic language structure and provide additional oral (listening and speaking) and written (reading and writing) communication skills. (Prerequisite: 08-110 or the former 07-110 , or permission of instructor. Students may not obtain credit for this course and the former 07-111)


08-210. Intermediate Arabic I
The course targets the four basic language skills of modern standard Arabic: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Reading and writing assignments in this class will expose students to a large variety of vocabulary and topics in religion, culture, and politics. Students are expected to read, to report on written material in Arabic (newspapers, comics, magazines), and to listen to Arabic news and songs. The ultimate objective of the course is to help them to acquire and to apply language tasks such as paraphrasing and summarizing short texts, communicating their points of view in writing and speaking, as well as describing and narrating events. (Prerequisite: 08-110 and 08-111, or permission of instructor.)

08-211. Intermediate Arabic II
This course will serve as a continuation of Intermediate Arabic I with equal emphasis on speaking, reading, oral and aural skills. The course will cover advanced aspects of grammar and structure of modern written Arabic. Selected readings from contemporary Arabic culture and politics will be introduced into the curriculum and will serve as basis for reading and conversation. (Prerequisite: 08-210, or permission of instructor.)

08-261.Introduction to Arabic Culture
An interdisciplinary cultural studies course surveying the complex history that has shaped Arabic culture and the major forces that continue to effect changes in Arabic culture. (The course is offered in English.)

08-262. Modern Arabic Literature
A survey of modern Arabic literature (in English translation). Selected texts are studied as literature with constant reference to the social, cultural and political contexts in which they were written. Students are introduced to the major modern Arabic genres and discursive practices, with particular emphasis on poetry and fiction, as well as major Arabic literary and intellectual figures. (The course is offered in English.)

08-361. Literature and Film in North Africa and the Middle East
This course introduces students to North African and Middle Eastern film and literature as interrelated activities involved in the process of cultural production and consumption. It offers a structured elaboration of the social, political and cultural context in which Arabic cinema and literature have evolved and provides students with a critical introduction to the language of film and literary and cultural criticism.

08-362. Modern Arabic Poetry in Translation
This course will introduce students to modern Arabic poetry, its language, style, and themes. It will also highlight the influence of western poetic movements and schools on Arab poets.

08-401 Directed Studies in Arabic Language
This course is designed for students who wish to do independent research on any aspect of contemporary Arab literature and or to fulfill an Arabic language requirement.

08-402 Directed Studies in Arabic Culture
The course is designed for students who wish to do independent research on any aspect of contemporary Arab culture to fulfill a Minor in Arabic Studies requirement. (Pre-requisites: 01-150 and 01-151)

08-403 Directed Studies in Arabic Literature
These courses are designed for students who wish to do independent research on any aspect of contemporary Arab literature and or to fulfill an Arabic language requirement. (Pre-requisites: 01-150 and 01-151)

RELIGION AND CULTURE

07-100. Religion and Culture
An introduction to the nature and important functions of religion and religious beliefs in contemporary culture.

07-222. Special Topics in Religion and Culture
An examination of important contemporary religious themes and issues. Since content varies from year to year, students may repeat the course for credit, with prior permission.

07-230. Christianity: Early Church to the Reformation
From the fall of the Western Roman Empire, the conversion of Europe, relations between Eastern Greek and Western Latin churches, struggle for supremacy between church and state, rise of monasticism, mysticism, and scholasticism, to the pre-reformation period.

07-231. Christianity: Reformation to the Modern Age
The break-up of Christendom and the founding of new religious denominations during the Protestant Reformation of the sixteenth century; the spread of European culture through colonialism; the impact of new cultural developments in the political, scientific, and economic realms to the nineteenth century.

07-323. God and Evil in Western Culture
An examination of traditional and contemporary attempts to reconcile the world's suffering and anguish with the existence of God. (Prerequisite: Students must have completed at least semester 3 standing or obtained the permission of the instructor.)

SECOND LANGUAGE EDUCATION

07-120. Introduction to Language and Linguistics
An introduction to the scientific study of language, including language structure, sound systems, semantics, language origins, language families and language classification, (Required of all Modern Languages majors and recommended in the first year of study.)

07-220. Language, Linguistics and Society
This course complements 07-120. The scientific study of language and its interaction with society: contextualized language use, discourse and text linguistics, social and regional variation, language and the brain, language processing, language acquisition, and writing systems. (Required of all Modern Languages majors. Recommended to take in sequence with 07-120)

07-320. Theories of Language Acquisition
An introduction to current theories regarding how language is acquired, with a special focus on the acquisition of second and additional languages, and on the factors that play a role in the acquisition process. (Prerequisites: 07-120 or 07-220, or equivalent or consent of instructor.)

07-321. Methodologies for Second Language Education
An introduction to current methods of second language teaching through an examination of curriculum development, lesson planning and classroom techniques. (Prerequisites:
07-120 and 07-220, or permission of instructor.)

07-357. Directed Studies Abroad I
This course will expose students to day-to-day situations, in order for them to complement and integrate traditional university learning with an immersion in real life situations. The intent is to stimulate an empirical attitude towards knowledge gained through experience. The focus of this course will be an in-depth analysis of differences and similarities between Canadian culture and the host culture. (Note: this is a Distance Education course offered in English which is available only to students on exchange through Windsor International at a location where English is not the local language.)

07-358. Directed Studies Abroad II
This course is a continuation of Directed Studies Abroad I. It will expose students to day-to-day situations, in order for them to complement and integrate traditional university learning with an immersion in real life situations. The intent is to stimulate an empirical attitude towards knowledge gained through experience. The focus of this course will be an in-depth analysis of differences and similarities between Canadian culture and the host culture. (Note: this is a Distance Education course offered in English which is available only to students on exchange through Windsor International at a location where English is not the local language.)

07-420. Second Language Education Practicum
SLE students will be required to design a second language education course for a specific clientele, deliver their curriculum and have that curriculum assessed critically. (Prerequisites: 07-320 and 07-321.)

GERMAN, ITALIAN AND SPANISH LITERATURE AND CULTURE

07-137. Introduction to German, Italian, and Spanish Literature
A study of the history and culture of European civilization through salient works of German, Italian and Spanish literature (in English translation).

07-237. German, Italian and Spanish Literary Traditions
A study of the forms and structures of German, Italian and Spanish literature (in English translation) including a survey of genres, styles and rhetorical figures.(Antirequisties: 07-237 and the former 07-334.)

07-337. Applied Literary Criticism
A hands-on approach to selected theories used to analyze literary texts and films. Students will read and write literary criticism, with an aim to understanding the underlying questions, assumptions, interpretive possibilities and limitations of each theoretical approach. (Students cannot obtain credit for both 07-337 and the former 07-437.)

07-437. Studies in German, Italian and Spanish Literary and Visual Culture
This course studies connections between the visual arts and literature in selected periods of Western culture from medieval to modern times. Special attention is paid to the social context of the periods in question, as well as stylistic implications. Interdisciplinary forays into adjacent fields such as architecture, music, psychology, and science may also be included. This is an advanced undergraduate course with special focus on critical methodologies and comparative research. Topics may vary from year to year. (Prerequisites: 07-137, 07-237 or approval of the instructor.)

CULTURE AND IDEAS

07-202. Culture and Ideas: From the Black Death to the Enlightenment
An interdisciplinary, team-taught survey course focussing on major issues and achievements in European civilization from the late Middle Ages to the era of the Enlightenment, including literary, religious, and philosophical writings as well as art and music.

07-203. Culture and Ideas: From the French Revolution to the Present
An interdisciplinary, team-taught survey course focussing on major issues and achievements in Europe and North America in the nineteenth, twentieth, and twenty-first centuries, including development in the visual arts, music, architecture, philosophy, religion, literature and science.

DIASPORA STUDIES

07-235. To Auschwitz and Beyond: Reflections on the Meaning of the Holocaust
An examination of responses to key issues raised by the Holocaust as reflected in postwar culture both in Canada and abroad. (Also offered as Languages, Literatures and Cultures 06-235)

07-236. Surviving Survival: Reflections on Genocide, War and Trauma
An examination of the impact of war, genocide, and trauma on individuals and communities, as reflected in film, literature, and the arts.

07-409. Directed Studies
Independent study for the advanced student who wishes to explore a specialized area of interest within the program under the supervision of a faculty member. (To be taken only under exceptional circumstances with the permission of the instructor and a program advisor. May be repeated for credit if the content is different. Hours and assignments by arrangement.)

ASIAN STUDIES

10-262. Special Topics in Chinese Culture
This course will provide a topical introduction to Chinese culture. The topics may be either historical or contemporary. Topics may change from year to year. (Students may repeat the course for credit if the content changes.)

10-264. Special Topics in Chinese Literature
This course covers the development of modern Chinese literature in English translation. Classic works and literary characters will be classified and analyzed. Students will compare different writing genres and integrate them with the socio-cultural background of modern Chinese writers. Students will be expected to present their own perspectives through written papers and oral presentations. (Three lecture hours per week.)

10-409. Directed Readings in Asian Studies
(May be repeated for credit with approval of LLC.)


GREEK AND ROMAN STUDIES

11-161. Introduction to Greek Civilization
An introduction to the cultural values and achievements of the ancient Greeks. Topics will include geography, history, mythology and religion, language and literature, art and daily life. (Recommended for prospective Greek and Roman Studies majors.)

11-162. Introduction to Roman Civilization
An introduction to the cultural values and achievements of the ancient Romans. Topics will include geography, history, mythology and religion, language and literature, art and daily life. (Recommended for prospective Greek and Roman Studies majors.)

11-211. Greek Prose
An introduction to ancient Greek prose literature from the fifth century BC to the second century AD, with selected readings in translation. Authors may include historiographers, orators, philosophers, or novelists. Topics may vary from year to year. (May be repeated for credit if content changes.)

11-212. Greek Poetry
An introduction to ancient Greek poetry from the eighth century BC to the second century AD, with selected readings in translation. Authors may include Homer, Hesiod, other early Greek poets, or dramatists (including those of tragedy, comedy, and the satyr play). Topics may vary from year to year. (May be repeated for credit if content changes.)

11-221. Latin Prose
An introduction to ancient Latin prose literature from the third century BC to the second century AD, with selected readings in translation. Authors may include orators, historiographers, novelists, or philosophers. Topics may vary from year to year. (May be repeated for credit if content changes.)

11-222. Latin Poetry
An introduction to ancient Latin poetry from the third century BC to the fourth century AD, with selected readings in translation. Authors may include dramatists, epic poets, elegists, or satirists. Topics may vary from year to year. (May be repeated for credit if content changes.)

11-265. Greek Art and Archaeology
A study of the artistic masterpieces and monuments of ancient Greece. Topics will include the search for Troy, the spirit of Greek sculpture, and Athens in the Golden Age. (Prerequisite: 11-161 or consent of instructor.)

11-266. Roman Art and Archaeology
A study of the artistic masterpieces and monuments of ancient Rome. Topics will include the tombs of the Etruscans and treasures of Pompeii and Rome in the days of the Caesars. (Prerequisite: 11-162 or consent of instructor.)

11-271. Religions of the Ancient World
An introduction to religions from the ancient Near East and Mediterranean, such as those of Mesopotamia, Egypt, Israel, Greece, and Italy. Topics may include the decline of paganism and polytheism and the rise of Christianity and monotheism, sacred texts and rituals, priests and other religious personnel, and mystery religions and mysticism. (Prerequisite: 11-161 or 11-162, or consent of instructor)

11-280. Topics in Classical Culture
A thematic examination of a single social historical topic in Greco-Roman antiquity. Topics may vary from year to year. (May be repeated for credit if content changes.)

11-320. Topics in Classical Literature
An in-depth study of some aspect of ancient Greco-Roman literature that may be thematic or generic in scope. Topics may vary from year to year. May be repeated for credit if content changes. (Prerequisite: 11-161 and 11-162, or consent of instructor)

11-330. The Ancient World on the Screen
An exploration of modern depictions of ancient Greece and/or Rome in movies and/or on television. (Prerequisite: 11-161 and 11-162, or consent of instructor.)

11-360. Topics in Ancient Material Culture
This rotating topics course provides an in-depth study of some aspect of ancient material culture that may be thematic or chronological in scope. Required readings more usually consist of ancient sources in English translation and/or articles in modern scholarly journals than formal textbooks. May be repeated for credit if content changes. (Prerequisite: 11-265 or 11-266).

11-370. Greek Mythology
A study of the myths and legends of ancient Greece. Modern theories of myth will be used to analyze the Greek material. They study will include both literacy sources in translation and the portrayal of myth in visual art and in architecture. (Prerequisite: 11-161 and 11-162, or consent of instructor.)

11-372. Roman Mythology
A study of the myths and legends of ancient Rome. Modern theories of myth will be used to analyze the Roman material. The study will include both literary sources in translation and the portrayal of myth in visual art and in architecture. (11-161 and 11-162, or consent of instructor)

11-401. Seminar in Classical Studies
An in-depth study of an aspect of Greco-Roman antiquity. Topics may vary from year to year. (Prerequisite: at least semester 5 standing, or consent of instructor)

11-450. Practicum in Classical Archaeology
Students will participate in various aspects (e.g. digging, artifact processing and analysis) of the excavation of an ancient Greek or Roman site in Europe. They will also visit and report on several key archaeological sites in the region. (Note: this is a 6-credit-hour course.) (Prerequisites: Admission only by consent of instructor after an interview with the candidate. Experience in Classical Studies courses (numbered 01-11-xxx and/or 01-12-xxx) is highly recommended, though not always essential. Given the nature of archaeological excavation abroad, the assembly of a team of hardworking, emotionally mature, and mutually compatible individuals is of paramount importance. All other factors being equal, preference will be given to Classical Studies majors over non-majors and to more senior students over more junior.) May be repeated for credit if content changes.

11-460. Directed Readings in Classical Civilization
Designed for the advanced student who wishes to explore a special area of interest with the aid of a faculty advisor. (May be repeated for credit if content changes.) (Hours by arrangement.)

GREEK AND ROMAN HISTORY

12-262. Greek History I: To the End of the Classical Period
This course is an illustrated survey of the historical and social development of Greek civilization from the Neolithic period (circa 6000 BC) to the death of Alexander the Great (323 BC), with particular emphasis on the political history of Athens in the sixth through fourth centuries BC. Selected readings of Greek texts in translation examine particular events or themes in greater depth. (Prerequisite: 11-161 or consent of instructor.)

12-263. Greek History II: To the End of the Hellenistic Period
This course is an illustrated survey of the historical and social development of Greek civilization from the time of Alexander the Great's conquests (326-323 BC) to Rome's annexation of the last major Greek kingdom, Cleopatra's Egypt, in 30 BC. The continuing role of Greek cities under the Roman Empire can also be examined. Selected readings of Greek texts in translation examine particular events or themes in greater depth. (Prerequisite: 11-161 or consent of instructor.)

12-271. Roman History I: To the End of the Republic
An exploration of Roman social and political history from Rome’s earliest foundations to the collapse of the Republic (1000-27 BC). This will include a close examination of the Roman conquest of the Italian peninsula, the Punic Wars and Civil Wars, as well as the study of such important figures as Hannibal and Julius Caesar. (Prerequisite: 11-162 or consent of instructor.)

12-272. Roman History II: To the End of the Empire
An exploration of Roman social and political history from the establishment of the Empire by Augustus to its fall (27 BC. - AD 476). This will include a close examination of the expansion and administration of the Empire and wars against the Parthians, Persians and Germans as well as the study of individual Emperors and other important literary and historical figures of the time. (Prerequisite: 11-162 or consent of instructor.)

12-310. Topics in Ancient History
This rotating topics course is an in-depth study of some aspect of ancient history that may be thematic or chronological in scope. Required readings usually consist of ancient sources in English translation and/or articles in modern scholarly journals than formal textbooks. May be repeated for credit if content changes. (Prerequisite: at least one 12-2xx course, or by consent of instructor)

12-460 Directed Reading in Ancient History
This directed reading course provides an advanced study of some aspect of Greco-Roman history that may be thematic or chronological in scope. The course is limited to Greek and Roman Studies majors in the final two years of their program. The particular topic and schedule of instruction in each case is to be determined by mutual agreement of instructor and student. (May be repeated for credit if content changes.) (Prerequisite: 12-310)

GREEK LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE

13-100. Introduction to Ancient Greek I
Designed to equip the beginner with the basic skills needed for reading ancient Greek literature, including the New Testament.

13-101. Introduction to Ancient Greek II
Designed to equip the beginner with the basic skills needed for reading ancient Greek literature, including the New Testament. (Prerequisite: 13-100.)

13-200. Intermediate Greek I
Review of vocabulary and grammar. Readings from classical prose, poetry, or the New Testament. (Prerequisite: 13-101.)

13-201. Intermediate Greek II
Continuation of 13-200. (Prerequisite: 13-200.)

13-450. Directed Readings in Greek Literature
Designed for the student who wishes to explore a special area of interest with the aid of a faculty advisor. (May be repeated for credit if content changes.) (Hours by arrangement.)

LATIN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE

14-100. Introductory Latin I
Designed for the student with little or no background in Latin. Emphasis on attainment of reading skills prerequisite for Latin courses numbered 200- and above, and for practical use in theology, philosophy, medieval studies, linguistics, and comparative literature.

14-101. Introductory Latin II
Continuation of 14-100. (Prerequisite: 14-100 or consent of an advisor in Classics.)

14-200. Intermediate Latin I
Designed for students who have previously studied Latin. Review of forms, syntax and grammar. Selected passages from the works of Latin authors may be used. (Prerequisite: 14-101 or permission of a program advisor.)

14-201. Intermediate Latin II
Review of forms, syntax, and grammar. Selected passages from the works of Latin authors. (Prerequisite: 14-200 or consent of an advisor in Classics.)

14-450. Directed Readings in Latin Literature
Designed for the student who wishes to explore a special area of interest with the aid of a faculty advisor. (May be repeated for credit if content changes.) (Hours by arrangement.)

GERMAN LANGUAGE OPTION

Requirements for degree programs in German make reference to the following groups of courses:
German Language: 15-101, 15-102, 15-200, 15-202, 15-300, 15-301, 15-329
German Literature: 07-137, 07-237, 07-337
German Culture: 15-260, 15-261, 15-312, 15-336, 15-337, 15-338, 15-490


15-102. Intensive German for Beginners
This intensive language-training course combines the content of two courses into a single term. Students will obtain credit for two courses. Note: 6 hours of class time per week. (Only for students with no prior knowledge of German).)

15-202. Intensive Intermediate German
This intensive language-training course combines the content of two courses into a single term. Students will obtain credit for two courses. Note: 6 hours of class time per week. (Prerequisites: 15-101 or 15-102, or permission of instructor.)

15-248. German Cinema
This course will cover the main periods of German cinema: expressionism of the 1920s, propaganda films of the Nazi era, East and West-German Cold War cinema and films of the post-reunification period. The focus will be on German film language and the historic and cultural traditions.

15-260. German Culture and Civilization I
An interdisciplinary introduction to political, social, and cultural developments in Germanic lands before 1815. (Taught in English. No prerequisities. May be repeated more than once if content changes.)

15-261. German Culture and Civilization II
An interdisciplinary introduction to political, social, and cultural developments in Germanic lands from 1815 onward. (Taught in English. No prerequisites. May be repeated more than once if content changes.)

15-300. Advanced German I
Further study of grammar and syntax. (Prerequisite: 15-202 or permission of Program Advisor.)

15-301. Advanced German II
Continuation of 15-300. (Prerequisite: 15-300, or consent of a program advisor.)

15-400. Proficiency in German
Emphasis is placed on understanding a wide range of demanding and longer texts (press, literature, etc.) Students will enhance their ability to express themselves fluently and spontaneously. Students will use the target language flexibly and effectively for social, academic and professional purposes. Students will learn to communicate fluently in the target language using complex grammar structures as well as complex text production. (Prerequisite: 15-301 or permission of instructor)

15-401. Proficiency in Written German
This course seeks to consolidate and enhance writing and reading skills at an advanced level of proficiency. Topics of study may include: translation techniques, mastery of complex syntactical structures, study of disparate academic, journalistic and literary texts. (Prerequisite: 15-301)

15-490. Directed Readings in Germanic Studies
(Prerequisite: Consent of a program advisor.) (May be repeated for credit if content changes.)

ITALIAN LANGUAGE OPTION

Requirements for degree programs in Italian make reference to the following groups of courses:

Italian Language: 21-101, 21-102, 21-200, 21-300, 21-301
Italian Literature: 07-137, 07-237, 07-337, 21-450, 21-490
Italian Culture: 21-248; 21-260, 21-261, 21-331, 21-350, 21-356


21-102. Intensive Italian for Beginners
This intensive language-training course combines the course content of 21-100 and 21-101 into a single term. Note: 6 hours of class time per week. (Only for students with no prior knowledge of Italian) (Antirequisites: 21-100 or 21-101.)

21-202. Intensive Intermediate Italian
This intensive language-training course combines the content of two courses into a single term. Students will obtain credit for two courses. Note: 6 hours of class time per week. (Prerequisites: 21-101 or 21-102, or permission of instructor.) (Antirequisites: 21-200)

21-248. Italian Cinema
The course takes the student on a journey through fifty years of Italian history using subtitled films representative of three pivotal periods. The course is taught in English.

21-260. Italian Culture and Civilization I
The cultural traditions of Italy from early times to the end of the Middle Ages. (Taught in English.) (Italian majors will be expected to do assigned work in Italian.)

21-261. Italian Culture and Civilization II
The cultural traditions of Italy from the Renaissance to modern times. (Taught in English.) (Italian majors will be expected to do assigned work in Italian.)

21-300. Advanced Italian I
Emphasis on reading, understanding and writing commentaries on short literary, historical and journalistic texts with the support of reference tools. (Prerequisite: 21-202 or permission of Program
Advisor.)

21-301. Advanced Italian II
Continuation of 21-300. Emphasis on oral discussion of cultural and literary texts and written enhancement of idiomatic usage of the language with the support of appropriate tools. (Prerequisite: 23-300 or permission of program advisor.)

21-356. Renaissance Ideals: Sculpting the Italian Mind
This course will focus on the contributions of the Italian renaissance to literature, philosophy, religion, visual arts, political science and the natural sciences. The course will be taught in English.

21-400. Proficiency in Italian
Emphasis is placed on understanding a wide range of demanding and longer texts (press, literature, etc.) Students will enhance their ability to express themselves fluently and spontaneously. Students will use the target language flexibly and effectively for social, academic and professional purposes. Students will learn to communicate fluently in the target language using complex grammar structures as well as complex text production. (Prerequisite: 21-301 or permission of instructor.)

21-401. Proficiency in Written Italian
This course seeks to consolidate and enhance writing and reading skills at an advanced level of proficiency. Topics of study may include: translation techniques, mastery of complex syntactical structures, study of disparate texts (e.g. academic, journalistic, literary).(Pre-requisite: 21-301).

21-490. Directed Readings
Designed for the advanced student who wishes to explore a special area of interest in Italian literature. (May be repeated for credit if content changes.)

SPANISH LANGUAGE OPTION

Requirements for degree programs in Spanish make reference to the following groups of courses:
Spanish Language: 23-101, 23-102, 23-200, 23-300, 23-301, 23-330
Spanish Literature: 07-137, 07-237, 07-337
Spanish Culture: 23-260, 23-261, 23-329

23-101. Spanish for Beginners II
Basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing and an introduction to Hispanic cultures. (Prerequisite: 23-100 or equivalent.)

23-102. Intensive Spanish for Beginners
This intensive language-training course combines the content of 23-100 and 23-101 in a single term. Note: 6 hours of class time per week. (Only for students with no prior knowledge of Spanish.) (Antirequisites: 23-100 or 23-101.)

23-202. Intensive Intermediate Spanish
This intensive language-training course combines the course content of two courses into a single term. Students will obtain credit for two courses. (6 credit hours; 6 hours of class time per week.) (Prerequisites: 23-100 and 23-101, or 23-102.) (Antirequisites: 23-200 and 23-201.)

23-248. Spanish Cinema
This course will study the cinema of Spain and/or Latin America. The focus will be on important film directors, such as Saura, Almodovar or Buñuel as well as the main issues covered by these films (e.g. youth culture, perception of women, literature and film, social analysis, etc.). The course will place the films into an historic, social and artistic context. The course is conducted in English with subtitled or dubbed films.

23-260. Culture and Civilization of Spain
Readings and discussion, in English, of topics from the history and culture of Spain.

23-261. Culture and Civilization of Spanish America
Readings and discussion, in English, of topics from the history and culture of Spanish America.

23-300. Advanced Spanish I
Further study of grammar and syntax. Written and oral exercises emphasizing subtle and/or particularly difficult grammar points. (Prerequisite: 23-221, 23-202 or permission of Program Advisor.)

23-301. Advanced Spanish II
Continuation of 23-300. (Prerequisite: 23-300 or permission of Program Advisor).

23-317. Spanish for Business
An introduction to the specialized business vocabulary and business practices of Spanish speaking countries. (Prerequisites: 23-202)

23-330. Language Training through Literature from Spain
A study of literary texts from Spain as a means to improve language mastery through advanced review of grammatical structures and enhancement of vocabulary. The course is conducted in Spanish. (Prerequisite:23-301 or permission of instructor.)

23-400. Proficiency in Spanish
Emphasis is placed on understanding a wide range of demanding and longer texts (press, literature, etc.) Students will enhance their ability to express themselves fluently and spontaneously. Students will use the target language flexibly and effectively for social, academic and professional purposes. Students will learn to communicate fluently in the target language using complex grammar structures as well as complex text production. (Prerequisite 23-301 or permission of instructor)

23-490. Directed Study
(May be taken more than once if content changes.) (Prerequisites will vary depending on the focus of the course.) (Can not obtain credit for both 23-450 and 23-490.)


FRENCH STUDIES

All courses with the prefix 29- are taught in French. Not all courses are offered every year. Please contact the French Studies program at the Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures office or its web site at www.uwindsor.ca/french.

Courses are three hours a week (3.00 credit hours) unless otherwise indicated. Language and linguistics courses may require laboratory and/or field work.

An antirequisite is a specific course or level of attainment which, if already successfully completed, does not permit registration for credit in another desired course, or which may not be taken for credit concurrently with another course.

29-114. Preparatory French: Intermediate Level II
Further training in grammar. Reading and writing skills. Additional aural comprehension and oral practice. Laboratory work. This course is equivalent to Grade 12“U” French or equivalent. (Antirequisite: Grade 12“U” French or equivalent, or higher.) (Prerequisite: Grade 11 French, or equivalent.)

29-121. French Language Training I
A study of norms and functions of the French verb system, nouns, pronouns, and modifiers. Oral practice, pronunciation and composition. (Prerequisite: Grade 12“U” French or Français, or equivalent.) (Antirequisite: any previous 200-level French language training courses.)

29-122. French Language Training II
Further study of the norms and functions of the French verb system, nouns, pronouns, and modifiers. Development of reading comprehension. Oral practice, composition. (Prerequisite: Grade 12“U” French or Français, or equivalent.) (Antirequisite: any previous 200-level French language training courses.)

29-123. Intensive French Language Training I
This intensive language-training course combines the course content of 29-121 and 29-122 into a single term. Students will obtain credit for two courses. (6 credit hours; 6 hours of class time per week.) (Prerequisite: Grade 12 “U” French or Français, or equivalent.) (Antirequisites: 29-121, 29-122 and any previous 200-level French language training courses.)

29-141. Introduction to Literary Studies
An introduction to the analysis of literary genres: poetry, drama and prose fiction. (Prerequisite: Grade 12“U” French or Français, or equivalent.) (Note: 29-141 is a prerequisite course for all literature courses in French Studies.)

29-215. Oral Proficiency in French I
A course designed to strengthen the student's competence in oral French through intensive training at an intermediate level, in both oral expression and aural comprehension. (May not be taken for credit by native speakers of French.) (Prerequisite: permission of instructor.)

29-221. French Language Training III
Effective oral and written communication; practice in the logical development of ideas; vocabulary expansion. (Prerequisites: 29-121 and 29-122, or 29-123.)

29-222. French Language Training IV
Effective oral and written communication. Demonstration and discussion of the spoken and written codes, oral exercises, written practice
(Prerequisites: 29-121 and 29-122 or 29-123 (double credit.)

29-223. Intensive French Language Training II
This intensive language-training course combines the course content of 29-221 and 29-222 into a single term. Students will obtain credit for two courses. (6 credit hours; 6 hours of class time per week.) (Prerequisites: 29-121 and 29-122, or 29-123.) (Antirequisites: 29-221 and 29-222.)

29-230. Introduction to Linguistics I
A survey of fundamental linguistic concepts and ideas of language. Language analysis at the first three levels of description: phonetics, phonology and morphology. (Prerequisites: 29-121 and 29-122, or 29-123, or permission of instructor.)

29-231. Introduction to Linguistics II
Language analysis at the remaining levels of description: syntax, semantics, discourse analysis and pragmatics. A brief introduction to sociolinguistics, psycholinguistics and neurolinguistics.
(Prerequisites: 29-121 and 29-122, or 29-123, or permission of instructor.)

29-252. French Classicism
An introduction to the literature of seventeenth-century France and its principal doctrines. (Prerequisite: 29-141.)

29-253. The French Enlightenment
An introduction to the literature and thought of eighteenth-century France. (Prerequisite: 29-141.)

29-255. French Romanticism
A study of the romantic aesthetic through the poetry, prose, and drama of major romantic writers of the nineteenth century. (Prerequisite: 29-141.)

29-257. Realism and Naturalism
A study of post-romantic prose writing in the nineteenth century. (Prerequisite: 29-141.)

29-260. Modern French Culture
A general study of the patterned behaviour which constitutes the modern French cultural system, focusing on its intellectual, sociological, political, and religious aspects. Students will be required to read texts and will also avail themselves of the latest audiovisual technology. Prerequisites: 29-121.)

29-270. Introduction to the Cultural Heritage of French Canada
An introduction to the francophone cultural experience in Canada.(Prerequisites: 29-121)

29-281. Introduction to the Culture of Sub-Saharan Francophone Africa
An introduction to various cultures of sub-Saharan Francophone Africa from pre-colonial times to the present. Students will be required to read some historical texts and representative literature. Some television documentaries and films will also be viewed. (Prerequisites: 29-121)

29-283. Introduction to Francophone Culture of the Maghreb and the Middle East
An introduction to contemporary francophone culture in North Africa (Morocco, Algeria, and Tunisia) and the Middle East (Lebanon), largely through the study of films, popular music, media, newspapers, art exhibits and/or television programs as well as theoretical works that formulate the (post)colonial discourse. (Prerequisites: 29-121).

29-284. The Novel in Quebec and in Other Francophone Regions of Canada
From the novel of the land to the post-modern novel in Francophone Canada. (Prerequisite: 29-141.)

29-315. Oral Proficiency in French II
A course designed to strengthen the student's competence in oral French through intensive training at an advanced level, both in oral expression and aural comprehension. (Prerequisite: permission of instructor.)

29-317. French for Business
A study of business terminology in French, and of the business practices of French speaking countries. (Prerequisites: 29-221, and 29-222, or 29-223.) (Note: 29-317 may replace 29-215 or 29-315.)

29-325. Error Analysis
A course designed to strengthen the student's competence in French through an analysis of the three most common sources of errors: the differences between spoken and written French, the first language and the interlanguage (unfinished French grammar) of the student. (Prerequisites: 29-221 and 29-222, or 29-223.)

29-328. Aspects of Translation I
A comparative analysis of French and English structures with special emphasis on translation processes. Accompanied by regular exercises in translation. (Prerequisites: 29-221 and 29-222, or 29-223.)

29-329. Aspects of Translation II
A comparative analysis of French and English structures with special emphasis on questions of meaning related to the sentence and its context. Accompanied by regular exercises in translation. (Prerequisites: 29-221 and 29-222, or 29-223.)

29-330. Applied Linguistics
An introduction to modern linguistic theories about language acquisition, followed by a comparative study of first and second language acquisition and a survey of second language teaching techniques highlighting the linguistic concepts underlying these techniques. (Prerequisite: 29-230 and 29-231.)

29-332. The History of the French Language
This course will examine successive stages in the development and spread of the French language from Late Antiquity to the present. (Prerequisite: 29-230 and 29-231, or permission of instructor.)

29-333. Sociolinguistic Aspects of French in Canada
A survey of the main characteristics of French in Canada with emphasis on its variations and varieties. Sociolinguistic concepts are introduced and discussed in relation to the situation of French in Canada. (Prerequisites: 29-230 and 29-231.)

29-350. French Literature of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance
This course will examine the major authors and genres of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, from the twelfth to the sixteenth century, including: the chanson de geste, the love songs of the troubadours, the Arthurian Romance, the sonnets of Ronsard, and the works of Rabelais. (Prerequisite: 29-141.)

29-353. Poetry from Baudelaire to Surrealism
A study of post-romantic, modernist poetry from the mid-nineteenth century to the mid-twentieth century. (Prerequisite: 29-141.)

29-354. The Modern Novel and Theatre
A study of modern theatre and of the novel from the turn of the century (1900) until the Nouveau Roman. (Prerequisite: 29-141.)

29-356. Contemporary Francophone Literature and Thought
The post-modern aesthetic and writing in francophone countries of sub-Saharan Africa and the French West Indies. (Prerequisite: 29-141.)

29-357. Contemporary Critical Theory
An introduction to a variety of major critical approaches and their applications to the literary text. (Prerequisites: 29-141, plus two additional courses in literature.) (Note: 29-357 is a required course for students enrolled in an Honours Bachelor of Arts in French Studies, and will be of particular value to those intending to pursue a Master of Arts degree.)

29-358. Francophone Literature of the Maghreb and the Middle East
Introduction to Francophone literature of the Maghreb (Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia) and the Middle East (Lebanon) (Prerequisite: 29-141)

29-383. Drama in Quebec and in other Francophone Regions of Canada
A study of the main dramatic works in Francophone Canada. (Prerequisite: 29-141.)

29-385. Poetry in Quebec and in other Francophone Regions of Canada
A study of the main works of poetry in Francophone Canada. (Prerequisite: 29-141.)

29-434. The French Lexicon
Detailed examination of the morphological, semantic and sociolinguistic characteristics of the French lexicon. (Prerequisite: 29-231.)


SPECIAL TOPICS COURSES

29-400 to 29-496. Special Topics
Special topics courses include the 400-series courses listed in the French Studies program. They cover language, linguistics and literature and may take the form of directed readings. (Prerequisites for special topics courses in language and linguistics: 29-230 and 29-231; for special topics courses in literature: 29-141; plus one additional course in literature.)
(May be repeated for credit if content changes.)


DIRECTED READINGS

29-497 to 29-499.
(Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.) (May be repeated for credit if content changes.)

STUDIES OUTSIDE THE UNIVERSITY OF WINDSOR

Students can immerse themselves in the French language and culture by spending their third year at the Université de Nice, France, in a program operated jointly with The University of Western Ontario, The University of Guelph and Memorial University, or can spend their third year at any of the French universities participating in the Ontario/Rhône-Alpes student exchange.

Students can also pursue studies in French at the Université du Québec à Montréal at the undergraduate level, for one or two semesters.

It is also possible to pursue studies in French at Quebec universities with the Summer Language Bursary Programme, or to study in Quebec for a year and be paid as a part-time, second-language monitor.