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Undergraduate Calendar
Winter 2019

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FACULTY OF ARTS, HUMANITIES, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES (FAHSS) COURSES
The following courses are offered through the Office of the Dean of Arts and Social Sciences. .

AERONAUTICS LEADERSHIP COURSES
ANTHROZOOLOGY COURSES
GENERAL FAHSS COURSES
DIGITAL JOURNALISM COURSES
INTERDISCIPLINARY ARTS AND SCIENCE COURSES
SOCIAL JUSTICE COURSES


AERONAUTICS LEADERSHIP: COURSES

GROUND OPTION

AERO-1960. Introduction to Aeronautics Leadership
Introduction to leadership training in the aeronautics field. Includes a 3 day leadership training session held just prior to the Fall term. Teamwork and submission of portfolio entries required. Marked on a pass/fail basis. 3 credits.
(Restricted to students in the LAPS Aeronautics Leadership Ground Option program.

AERO-3960. Internship in Aeronautics Leadership
Internship in leadership training in the aeronautics field. Work experience internship placement in the aviation industry, including the submission of portfolio entries. Internship placements are subject to availability, qualifications and acceptance by an airlines partner. (Marked on a pass/fail basis. 6 credits. Restricted to students in the LAPS Aeronautics Leadership Ground Option program.) (Pre-requisite: AERO-1960)

AERO-4960. Aeronautics Leadership Capstone Seminar
A capstone seminar in which students plan, gain approval for, carry out and present a research project relevant to the ground operations in the aviation industry. Restricted to students in the LAPS Aeronautics Ground Option program. (Marked on a pass/fail basis. 6 credits.) (Pre-requisite: AERO-1960)

PILOT OPTION

AERO-1970. Practicum in Professional Development, Pilot Training
Supervised practicum in professional development in pilot training. Introduction to leadership training, and aviation theory and practice. Includes a 3 day leadership training session held just prior to the Fall term. Completion of year one of pilot training plus submission of satisfactory portfolio entries to the supervising instructor required. (Marked on a pass/fail basis. Two semester course. 6 credits. Restricted to students in LAPS Pilot option program.)

AERO-2970. Practicum in Professional Development, Pilot Training
Supervised practicum in professional development in pilot training. Leadership training, navigation and meteorology. Completion of year two of pilot training plus submission of satisfactory portfolio entries to the supervising instructor required. (Marked on a pass/fail basis. Two semester course. 6 credits. Restricted to students in LAPS Pilot option program.) (Pre-requisite: 02-197)

AERO-3970. Practicum in Professional Development, Pilot Training
Supervised practicum in professional development in pilot training. Leadership training on health and safety issues. Completion of year three of pilot training plus submission of satisfactory portfolio entries to the supervising instructor required. (Marked on a pass/fail basis. Two semester course. 6 credits. Restricted to students in LAPS Pilot option program.) (Prerequisite: AERO-2970)

AERO-4970. Practicum in Professional Development, Pilot Training
Supervised practicum in professional development in pilot training. Leadership and management of flight crews and passenger safety. Completion of one year of post-pilot license training plus submission of satisfactory portfolio entries to the supervising instructor required. (Marked on a pass/fail basis. Two semester course. 6 credits. Restricted to students in LAPS Pilot option program. ) (Pre-requisite: AERO-3970)

ANTHROZOOLOGY COURSES

ANZO-1600. Animals and Humans in Society
This course will explore and consider the different types of relationships between animals and humans in contemporary society from a variety of physical, social, and psychological perspectives. Topics may include companion animals, animal rights and welfare, animals and food and entertainment, human-animal violence, and animal-assisted therapy. (Can be taken for either Social Science or Arts credit).

ANZO-2000. The Paw & the Pen: Animals in Literature
This course explores the varying and significant ways in which animals are represented in literature. Throughout Western literary history, animals appear in a variety of images, symbols, characters, and themes, which can be studied from a wide array of critical perspectives: natural realism; animal society; anthropomorphism; pests vs. pets; “owned” beings vs. companions; ecocriticism; cultural icons; and ethically and morally. The way in which animals both influence and reflect societal values is examined through human-animal relationships portrayed in selected texts, through class discussion and written analysis. (Can be taken as either a Social Science or Arts option.) (Prerequisite: 51-160 for Minor in Anthrozoology only.) (Open to English majors with semester 3 standing.)

ANZO-2600. Animals For Sport and Entertainment
Building on Animals and Humans in Society (51-160), this course will focus on many of the issues, controversies, and paradoxes, which are inherent to human relationships with animals as companions, for human entertainment, and animals in sports. Students will be expected to engage in meaningful discussions and readings, both verbally and through their own writing, applying different perspectives (ie. historical, sociological, cultural, etc.) to relevant topics. Potential topics for this class include: animal fighting as entertainment (cockfighting, dog fighting, bullbaiting, etc.); zoos and aquaria; circuses and rodeos; pedigree dogs and dog shows; and racing (greyhounds and horses). (Prerequisite: 51-160 or 02-160). (Can be taken as either a Social Science or Arts option).

ANZO-2610. Animals and the Law
This course, for undergraduate non-law majors, focuses on the role of law in human-animal interactions and the balancing of competing interests within traditional areas of law. Students will explore and debate the major issues surrounding animal welfare, rights, and protection, including the legal status of animals as living property, and the evolving societal beliefs and values surrounding these issues. The course will primarily focus on examining and comparing the laws of Canada and the United States, although laws and constitutions of other countries, as well as international law, will also be considered.(Prerequisite: 51-160). (Can be taken as either a Social Science or Arts option).

ANZO-3100. Canine Impact: Exploring the Dog-Human Relationship
This course will explore the significance of dogs in a human world from a range of perspectives, including biological, ethical, historical, psychological, and social. From the evolution of the domestic canid to the unique construction of breeds to status as a family member, the course will examine the dog's role and value as protector, hunter, and companion within the contexts of evolution, domestication, behaviour, and cognition. Theories and complexities of the canine-human relationship will be explored through readings, discussions, media, debates, observation, and experience.

ANZO-3600. Special Topics in Anthrozoology
This course focuses on a selected topic in Anthrozoology, which may vary according to special faculty interests and/or significant current issues. Among others, topics could include: Animals in the Arts; Companion Animals; Human-Animal History; Politics and Animals; Food and Sustainability; Zoos; Animals in Religion, etc. (Prerequisite: 51-160). (2 lecture hours a week). (May be repeated for credit, with permission of the instructor, if content is different). (Can be taken as either a Social Science or Arts option).

ANZO-4980. Anthrozoology Capstone
This capstone provides students the opportunity, in collaboration with the instructor, to design and implement their own unique learning experience by demonstrating their accumulated knowledge and understanding of anthrozoology in an original project of their choice, subject to the instructor’s approval. This course will reflect student knowledge of the interdisciplinary field of anthrozoology, which has been acquired through previous anthrozoology courses. The projects may be in collaboration with community partners, such as animal shelters, zoological parks, or educational environments. (Prerequisites: ANZO-1600, ANZO-2600, ANZO-2610, ANZO-3600.)

GENERAL FAHSS COURSES (01-)

GART-1200. Understanding the Contemporary World
This course will explore current political, cultural and social contexts. The perceived gulf between the "ivory tower" and the "real world" will be bridged each week as we analyze major current issues with attention to popular culture. (Restricted to year1 FAHSS majors.) (3 lecture/1 tutorial hours a week.) (6.0 credit course.)

GART-1500. Effective Writing I
A foundational course aimed at developing effective writing skills for communicating ideas in academic and other contexts. Topics may include grammar, paragraph writing conventions, academic learning, and critical thinking. This is a hybrid course.

GART-1510. Effective Writing II
A continuation of 01-150 aimed at developing and refining writing skills for communicating ideas in academic and other contexts. Topics may include grammar, essay writing conventions, research skills, scholarly citations, editing and revising, academic learning, and critical thinking. This is a hybrid course. (Prerequisite: 01-150.)

GART-2040. Health-Care Ethics through the Life-Span
Explores ethical issues of general interest which arise during the life-span, from conception until death, including methods to prevent contraception, methods to aid in reproduction, medical treatment for children, organ transplantation, research on human subjects, foregoing life-sustaining treatment, advance directives, assisted suicide, and euthanasia. This course is not directed specifically to health professionals.

01-209. Ethics in the Professions
Examines what constitutes a profession, its legitimacy, and its authority from society. The responsibilities of professionals to their clients, professions, and society are mapped. Codes of ethics and other statements of ethical standards, conflict of interest, and the roles of regulatory bodies and governments are examined and related to practice through relevant case studies.

GART-2100. Ways of Knowing – Selected Topics
This course explores the various ways that knowledge is created, shared, stored, retrieved and used in diverse environments. Students will connect with modernized, historical, and day-to-day examples of ways to manage knowledge. The topic for each year will be announced in advance and might include: an introduction to knowledge management; survey of research methods in the arts, humanities, and social sciences; leadership; diffusion of innovations; collaborative knowledge, and human and online networks. (Restricted to students with a minimum of second semester standing. (Also offered as 02-210.) (May be repeated for credit if the topics are different)

GART-2200. Investigating the Contemporary World
This course will explore the connections among culture, politics and society in historical and contemporary contexts with the use of case studies. (Restricted to students in the Fresh Start program.) (2 lecture/1 tutorial hours a week.) (Antirequisite: 01-120)
    GART-2990. Popular Culture: Special Topics
    This course explores a featured topic within contemporary popular culture through an Arts, Humanities and/or Social Science perspective. Topics for the course will vary and may include: between popular culture, street art, Web 2.0, gothic literature, reality television, fan culture and fandoms, celebrity culture, science fiction fantasy, and video gaming. Course delivery may also vary according to instructor preference. (Course may be repeated for credit if topic is different.) (Also offered as SOSC-2990.)

    GART-3100. Ways of Doing: Special Topics
    This course introduces students to a range of practices of civic and online engagement. Through collaborative project-based learning, students will develop well-researched and critically informed proposals and/or projects that address real-world issues and environments. Students will work in small groups to research and present their work in public settings and/or through online platforms. Restricted to students with Year 3 standing. This course is also offered as SOSC-3100. Students may repeat this course for credit if the topics are different.

    GART-4000. Mentorship and Learning
    An intensive exploration of the theory an d practice of learning and leadership which includes a practical component where students will mentor first-year students in a first-year course. Mentorship and Learning introduces students to learning theory, learning styles, group facilitation and effective leadership, critical thinking/reading and information literacy. Students will weave theory and practice throughout the semester, leading small group break-outs of first-year students. (Restricted to students in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences with at least Semester 5 standing, with consent of the instructor.) (A one-semester, 3-credit course offered in the Fall term.) (Also offered as SOSC-4000.) (Credit can only be obtained for one of GART-4000 or SOSC-4000) (3 lecture/4 3 lab hours a week.)

    GART-4100. Modern Leadership
    Students will review modern leadership theory and practices that were developed from the early 20th century to the present. Students will cover such relevant topics as: Servant Leadership, Behavioural Leadership, Psychodynamic Leadership, e-Leadership, Gender and Cultural Leadership, Path-Goal Theory, and Leader-Member Exchange Theory. (Restricted to students with at least semester 5 standing and by permission of the instructor.) (Also offered as SOSC-4100.)

    GENERAL FAHSS COURSES (02-)

    SOSC-1000. Introduction to Canadian Studies
    This course emphasizes the transition of Canada from a European colonial society to an immigrant, multicultural society. A multidisciplinary approach will be taken in dealing with the specific problems facing Canada today.

    02-103. Introduction to North American Studies
    This course offers an introduction to contemporary North American society and a broad spectrum of current issues and debates. A multi-disciplinary approach will be employed in the examination of North American institutions, social issues, politics, history, and culture. (This course is required for students in the North American Studies Certificate Program.) (3 lecture hours a week.)

    SOSC-2100. Ways of Knowing – Selected Topics
    This course explores the various ways that knowledge is created, shared, stored, retrieved and used in diverse environments. Students will connect with modernized, historical, and day-to-day examples of ways to manage knowledge. The topic for each year will be announced in advance and might include: an introduction to knowledge management; survey of research methods in the arts, humanities, and social sciences; leadership; diffusion of innovations; collaborative knowledge, and human and online networks. (Restricted to students with a minimum of second semester standing. (Also offered as GART-2100.) (May be repeated for credit if the topics are different)

    SOSC-2500. Basic Quantitative Methods in the Social Sciences
    Introduction to measurement of variables, organization and description of numerical data, testing hypotheses, inference, and interpretation of findings in the Social Sciences. Topics include descriptive statistics, normal distribution, probability, sampling, hypothesis testing, t-tests, correlation, and chi-square tests. (Antirequisite: 65-205, 65-250, 65-251, 73-102, 73-105, 73-205, 85-222, and 95-269.)

    SOSC-2990. Popular Culture: Special Topics
    This course explores a featured topic within contemporary popular culture through an Arts, Humanities and/or Social Science perspective. Topics for the course will vary and may include: between popular culture, street art, Web 2.0, gothic literature, reality television, fan culture and fandoms, celebrity culture, science fiction fantasy, and video gaming. Course delivery may also vary according to instructor preference. (Course may be repeated for credit if topic is different.) (Also offered as GART-2990.)

    SOSC-3100. Ways of Doing: Special Topics
    This course introduces students to a range of practices of civic and online engagement. Through collaborative project-based learning, students will develop well-researched and critically informed proposals and/or projects that address real-world issues and environments. Students will work in small groups to research and present their work in public settings and/or through online platforms. Restricted to students with Year 3 standing. This course is also offered as GART-3100. Students may repeat this course for credit if the topics are different.

    SOSC-3200. Working in Digital Communities I
    In this course students will learn how to negotiate work among the growing digital enterprises in the global economy. Students will study multi-disciplinary concepts of digital communities including use of or aversion to E-commerce infrastructure, financial transactions, business models, and marketing and advertising concepts. (Restricted to students with a minimum third semester standing).

    SOSC-3210. Working in Digital Communities II
    This is a continuation of Working in Digital Communities I. Students will study multi-disciplinary views regarding ethical issues, content, social networks, mobile applications, news, auctions, B2B transactions, and dispersed collaborations. (Prerequisite: SOSC-3200 or GART-2100/02-02-210, or GART-3100/SOSC-3100).

    SOSC-3500. Practical Strategies for Social Change: Intervening to Prevent Sexual Assault
    This course provides male and female students with an introduction to sexual violence as a social problem. The course addresses how this social problem manifests, why it matters, how it persists, and finally, how it can be change. The importance of personal and community responsibility for social change is emphasized. This course also provides students with the background knowledge that is needed to successfully teach sexual assault prevention education sessions for fellow students, using the Bringing in the Bystander® In Person Prevention workshop. Selected students will deliver the workshop by taking Practicum in Social Change (02-450/46-450/47-450/48-451/53-450) the following semester. Restricted to students who have attained a cumulative GPA of 66% or higher at the time of application. (Prerequisite: Semester 4 standing or above and permission of the instructor by online application at uwindsor.ca/bystander.) (Also offered as PSYC-3500, SWRK-3500, SACR-3500, and WGST-3500.)

    SOSC-4000. Mentorship and Learning
    An intensive exploration of the theory and practice of learning and leadership which includes a practical component where students will mentor first-year students in a first-year course. Mentorship and Learning introduces students to learning theory, learning styles, group facilitation and effective leadership, critical thinking/reading and information literacy. Students will weave theory and practice throughout the semester, leading small group break-outs of first-year students. (Restricted to students in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences with at least Semester 5 standing, with consent of the instructor.) (A one-semester, 3-credit course offered in the Fall term.) (Also offered as GART-4000.) (Credit can only be obtained for one of GART-4000 or SOSC-4000) (3 lecture/3 lab hours a week.)

    SOSC-4100. Modern Leadership
    Students will review modern leadership theory and practices that were developed from the early 20th century to the present. Students will cover such relevant topics as: Servant Leadership, Behavioural Leadership, Psychodynamic Leadership, e-Leadership, Gender and Cultural Leadership, Path-Goal Theory, and Leader-Member Exchange Theory. (Restricted to students with at least semester 5 standing and by permission of the instructor.)(Also offered as GART-4100.)

    SOSC-4500. Practicum in Social Change
    Supervised practicum in a university setting. Students consolidate and enhance their knowledge of sexual assault and bystander intervention. Students co-facilitate the Bringing in the Bystander® In Person Prevention program for one or more small groups of students on campus. The practicum experience equips students to deliver educational content on sensitive issues. (Prerequisite: 02-350/46-350/47-350/48-350/53-351 and permission of the instructor.) (Also offered as PSYC-4500, SWRK-4500, SACR-4500, and WGST-4500.)

    DIGITAL JOURNALISM

    DIGJ-1200. Reporting Fundamentals
    Through lessons, labs, case studies, group work, and writing and presentation assignments, students learn the fundamental principles and practices of daily and special assignment and reporting. A classroom-based curriculum taught by professional journalists, “Reporting Fundamentals” complements the hands-on design of the collaborative studios. (Enrolment initially restricted to Digital Journalism majors.)

    DIGJ-1250. Journalism Today
    This fundamental theory unit of the Digital Journalism curriculum introduces students to the history of journalism and the function of journalists in contemporary society. This unit emphasizes the distinction of Digital Journalism from traditional forms. An overview of the major themes, issues and schools of thought informing the field of media studies, “Journalism Today” addresses such topics as: the political, economic, historical, and cultural contexts of communication; policy issues and concerns; communication technology; media representation; the role of media in the social construction of reality; and the broad interaction between journalism and society. (Enrolment initially restricted to Digital Journalism majors.)

    DIGJ-1400. The Job - Collaborative Studio I
    From their first day in DJ at the University of Windsor students think and act as journalists. In “The Job” students each week identify, propose, research and prepare stories with full-time journalists as their mentors. In this collaborative studio course, students work together to solve problems in a flexible learning environment emphasizing realistic on-the-street experiences such as attending trials, news conferences, and public events. (Prerequisites: DIGJ-1250.) (Enrolment initially restricted to Digital Journalism majors.)

    DIGJ-2200. Introduction to Online Design and Publishing
    This unit concentrates on applying digitally generated content on the web. Here students will learn computer language and software used to build sites and, once the site is built, layer, insert hypertext links, prepare and post clickable maps, historical timelines, photo galleries/slide shows, etc., and their own journalistic projects. (Enrolment initially restricted to Digital Journalism majors.)

    DIGJ-2220. Introduction to Audio/Visual Production
    This fundamental production unit is organized around weekly assignments establishing students’ competency in use of audio and video equipment, editing and photojournalism. With an emphasis on electronic news gathering (ENG) the objective is to ensure that all Digital Journalism students have the same basic technical skill set. Students with a particular interest in A/V production can select electives to broaden their competencies in this area and develop a specialization applicable in “Newsroom” and “Professional Studio”. (Enrolment initially restricted to Digital Journalism majors.)

    DIGJ-2250. Media Law and Ethics
    Traditional standards of law and ethics are being re-evaluated as journalists increasingly work in a digital milieu. This unit establishes students’ understanding of the law and ethical issues surrounding matters such as defamation, restrictions on identifying suspects in criminal cases, and intellectual property. (Enrolment initially restricted to Digital Journalism majors.)

    DIGJ-2300. Writing for Digital Journalism
    Strong writing is the cornerstone of a successful journalism career. In this unit students learn the principles of writing news for mainstream and alternative digital media. They apply these principles in the research and preparation of assignments designed to instill clarity, precision and speed. (Enrolment initially restricted to Digital Journalism majors.)

    DIGJ-2400. Advanced Skills - Collaborative Studio II
    In “Advanced Skills” – Collaborative Studio II Digital Journalism students work the field. Each week under the direction of a professional journalist they apply the advanced technical and academic skills acquired in the previous three semesters to develop original independent and collaborative projects suitable for presentation in multiple digital formats. (Prerequisite: DIGJ-1400.) (Enrolment initially restricted to Digital Journalism majors.)

    DIGJ-3200. Computer-Assisted Reporting
    Digital technology has not only changed journalists’ physical work, it has also changed their intellectual work. In this course Digital Journalism students learn the practices of computer-assisted reporting (CAR), a broad area of investigative reporting that is premised on using a variety of techniques to acquire digital data and information and use it in journalism. (Enrolment initially restricted to Digital Journalism majors.)

    DIGJ-3400. Newsroom - Collaborative Studio III
    In their third year DJ students run the newsroom; they organize a management structure and select, research and report the stories that appear on the University of Windsor’s Digital Journalism website. This two-semester two-credit course requires students to complete a minimum number of stories during the year for the DJ program website, other campus media, local public outlets, community platforms, and/or university units and programs. As with other studio courses, professional journalists guide and evaluate students in this studio. (Prerequisites: DIGJ-2400.) (Enrolment initially restricted to Digital Journalism majors.)

    DIGJ-4300. Digital Journalism Practicum
    The Digital Journalism Practicum provides students in their third or fourth years with hands-on experience in professional journalism settings. In the practicum, students spend either a concentrated two-week period or a day-per-week internship for a semester in organizations such as print, radio or TV newsrooms, a public affairs company, a non-governmental organization, or in offices of members of government. In the practicum students will perform tasks reflecting the journalistic theory and skills they have learned in the DJ program. Students select either the two-week or one-day-per week option depending on their co-major schedule. (Prerequisite: DIGJ-3400)

    DIGJ-4400. Professional Studio - Collaborative Studio IV
    The “Professional Studio” is built around a one-semester capstone project. Students advancing to fourth year pitch a single or a multi-part project to faculty and professional journalists who monitor progress and evaluate through e-portfolios. DJ project pitches vary because not all journalists want to report; some want to develop technical specializations, some want to produce, some want to only research. Common to all capstone projects is students’ emphasis on an aspect of their interests in their co-major designation. (Prerequisites: DIGJ-3400.) (Enrolment initially restricted to Digital Journalism majors.)

    INTERDISCIPLINARY ARTS AND SCIENCE: COURSES

    ARSC-1000. Introduction to Interdisciplinary Arts and Science
    This course examines how various academic disciplines contribute to integrative understanding. The course examines the history of interdisciplinary studies and different models of integration. Students will develop skills in interdisciplinary research and problem solving, in oral and written communication, and in the synthesis of diverse perspectives. (Open only to students in the IAS program).

    ARSC-3010. World Civilizations
    An introduction to the politics, culture and history of world civilizations. Focus will vary from year to year, depending on the interests of the instructor. (Open only to students in the IAS program.)

    ARSC-3100. Modes and Methods of Inquiry
    This course introduces methodological themes and principles that span disciplines across the Arts and Sciences, with an emphasis on developing skills for the critical appraisal of research literature. The course will enable students to become critical readers of published research in a variety of disciplines. (Open only to students in the IAS program.)

    ARSC-4100. Inquiry and Communication
    An examination to inquiry-based learning with a focus on contemporary political and social issues emphasizing the professional preparation and presentation of research results. This course is designed to provide experiences with planning, developing, and writing a research proposal under individual faculty supervision. In addition, group sessions on research ethics, procedures, writing, and data analysis will be provided. (Open only to students in the IAS program.) (Prerequisite: ARSC-3100.)

    ARSC-4210. Science, Ethics and Social Policy
    Students will explore the ethical dimensions of contemporary scientific controversies and their implications for social policy. The focus will vary from year to year but may include such topics as stem cell research, invitro-fertilization, and global warming, emphasizing the role of scientific and ethical arguments in policy formation. (Open only to students in the IAS Program) (Prerequisite: ARSC-3100.)

    ARSC-4990. Research Project
    Students will design and implement a research project under the supervision of a faculty member integrating methodologies, critical perspectives and theoretical approaches acquired in the core IAS program. (Open only to students in the IAS program.) (A 6.00 credit hour research project, which counts as two courses.)


    SOCIAL JUSTICE COURSES

    SJST-1000. Social Justice in Action
    Students investigate the local and global origins of a contemporary social problem through the eyes of social justice activists. Students will assess the strengths and limitations of strategies and theoretical frameworks for social change and use this knowledge to create social action messages that raise public awareness, influence government or corporate policy, or positively change attitudes and behaviours. (3 lecture hours per week) (Also offered as Disability Studies DISB-1000.)

    SJST-1400. Queer Activism
    Students engage with LGBTQ+ activism, past and present. Students investigate how queer communities are created and sustained through protest, alliance-building, symbols, and memes. (Also offered as WGST-1400).

    SJST-2100. Being Heard: Advocating for Social Change
    Students envision a better world by raising awareness about social problems and practicing the advocacy skills needed to create a more just society. Students prepare, present and defend action plans that address the needs of those communities whose voices are undervalued in public discussions. (Prerequisite: DISB/SJST-1000 or semester 3 standing or above or permission of the instructor.)

    SJST-2180. Everyday Conflicts and Their Resolution
    Students design and practice techniques for resolving everyday conflicts with friends and co-workers effectively and respectfully, and without damaging interpersonal relationships. Students learn to focus on the problem, not the person; identify and respond to hidden agendas and subvert personal attacks. Pre-requisite: Semester 3 or above standing or permission of the instructor. (Also offered as PSYC-2180 and WORK-2180)

    SJST-2700. Speaking Truth to Power: Voice and Activism
    An examination of contemporary struggles for social change with a particular focus on anti-consumerist and environmental justice campaigns. Students learn to create persuasive social justice message. (Prerequisite: Semester 3 or above standing.) (Also offered as CMAF-2700, WORK-2700 and DRAM-2700).

    SJST-3000. Social Justice Seminar
    An inter-disciplinary exploration of the role of the state, alternative media, arts, literature, critical pedagogy, international and domestic law, social movements, non-governmental agencies, international governmental agencies, and scholars in bringing about social change. (Prerequisites: SJST-1000 and semester 5 standing.)