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Undergraduate Calendar
Spring 2021

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PHYSICS: COURSES

Not all courses listed will necessarily be offered in each year.

PHYS-1000.Introduction to Astronomy I
The solar system with emphasis on the results of recent space exploration. This is a descriptive course suitable for the non-scientist. (May be taken by B.Sc. students for credit, but does not count as a Physics course or other science course towards the fulfillment of the requirements for the B.Sc. degree.) (2 lecture hours a week.)

PHYS-1010.Introduction to Astronomy II
The stars, galaxies, including pulsars, black holes, and quasars. Current theories of the structure of the universe will be discussed. This is a descriptive course suitable for the non-scientist. (May be taken by B.Sc. students for credit, but does not count as a Physics course or other science course towards the fulfillment of the requirements for the B.Sc. degree.) (2 lecture hours a week.)

PHYS-1300.Introductory Physics for Life Sciences I
This is an algebra-based course intended for students interested in the biological or health sciences, or related disciplines. The topics covered include the basic mechanical concepts of force, work and energy, properties of matter, and heat, with examples and applications drawn from the modeling of biological systems. (Prerequisites: one 4 “U” or OAC mathematics course or equivalent.) (3 lecture hours a week, 2 laboratory hours and 1 tutorial hour every week) (Anti-requisites: PHYS-1305, PHYS-1400.) (Open to students in Human Kinetics, Forensic Science, Bachelor of Arts and Science, and all programs within in the Faculty of Science; exceptions only with the permission of the Head or designate.)

PHYS-1305. Introductory Physics for Life Sciences I (B)
This is an algebra-based course intended for students interested in the biological or health sciences, or related disciplines. The topics covered include the basic mechanical concepts of force, work and energy, properties of matter, and heat, with examples and applications drawn from the modeling of biological systems. This course serves as the prerequisite for PHYS-1400 and GENG-1110. Majors in Science and Majors in Engineering will not be given credit for this course. (Antirequisite: PHYS-1300.) (Prerequisites: One 4U or OAC mathematics course or equivalent.) (3 lecture hours a week.)

PHYS-1310. Introductory Physics for Life Sciences II
This course is a continuation of PHYS-1305 intended for students interested in the biological or health sciences, or related disciplines. The topics covered include wave motion, sound, electricity and magnetism, light, and an introduction to topics in modern physics involving the life sciences such as the quantum nature of radiation and its interaction with biomolecules, high energy radiation and radioactivity, and the statistical treatment of data. (Prerequisite: PHYS-1300 or PHYS-1400.) (3 lecture hours per week, 1 tutorial hour and 2 laboratory hours every week.) (Antirequisites: PHYS-1410.) (Open to students in Human Kinetics, Forensic Science, Bachelor of Arts and Science, and all programs within in the Faculty of Science; exceptions only with the permission of the Head or designate.)

PHYS-1400. Introductory Physics I
Mechanics; properties of matter and heat. A calculus-based course. (Prerequisites: Grade 12“U” Advanced Functions and Introductory Calculus or equivalent.) Recommended co-requisite: MATH-1720.) (3 lecture hours a week, 2 laboratory hours and 1 tutorial hour every week). Open to students in Human Kinetics, Forensic Science, Bachelor of Arts and Science, , and all programs within in the Faculty of Science; exceptions only with the permission of the Head or designate. (Antirequisites: PHYS-1300, PHYS-1305.)

PHYS-1410. Introductory Physics II
Wave motion, sound, electricity and magnetism, light, and modern physics. (Prerequisite: PHYS-1400 or GENG-1110.) (3 lecture hours per week, 1 tutorial hour and 2 laboratory hours every week.) (Antirequisites: PHYS-1310) (Open to students in Engineering, Human Kinetics, Forensic Science, Bachelor of Arts and Science, and all programs within in the Faculty of Science; exceptions only with the permission of the Head or designate.)

PHYS-1500. From Symmetry to Chaos in the Universe: An Introduction to Theoretical Methods in Contemporary Physics
An introduction to the pillars of 20th and 21st century physics which form the basis of subsequent courses in physics and the basis of current research: complexity and chaos, special and general relativity, quantum phenomena, symmetry and symmetry breaking, and cosmology. Motivated by these pillars, mathematical tools and techniques that are used extensively in physics for practical problem solving and data analysis are introduced at a first-year level. Computer-aided graphical and approximate computational methods will also be introduced. (Prerequisites: PHYS-1400, MATH-1720, and MATH-1250) (3 lecture hours and one tutorial hour per week.)

PHYS-2000. The Exoplanet Revolution
This course will examine the development and evolution of our understanding of the nature and origins of planetary systems before and after the discovery of the first exoplanets. Students will learn about the various methods used to detect and measure exoplanets, and will actively engage in the analysis of data collected through remote off-site telescopes. The course will include a review of recent discoveries regarding the different classes of planets that exist and their characteristics and origins. It will also look more closely at planets found in the habitable zones around their stars and the conditions that exist there, particularly in planetary atmospheres. Finally, it will review the latest developments in new telescope technologies and space missions and what their capabilities should allow astronomers to discover in coming years. (Prerequisite: PHYS-1000 or PHYS-1010.) (May be taken by B.Sc. students for credit, but does not count as a Physics course or other science course towards the fulfillment of the requirements for the B.Sc. degree.) (3 lecture hours a week.)

PHYS-2050.Physics and Society-The Past
Discoveries in astronomy have altered the way we perceive ourselves, our planet, and our place in the universe. This course, ‘From Antiquity to Newton’, reviews the contributions made by the Egyptians, Babylonians, Greeks, and Islamic cultures, together with medieval Christian views and on to the emergence of modern science. The course - which is a blend of physics, history, philosophy and religion - will also examine how we came to move from ‘geocentric’ to a ‘heliocentric’ view of the solar system, by examining the contributions of Copernicus, Brahe, Kepler, Galileo and Newton. (2 lecture hours a week.) Does not count towards the major requirements for a degree in the Department of Physics.

PHYS-2060.Physics and Society-The Present
Modern society is dominated by the dramatic development of physics and technology from the industrial revolution to the present. This development and its impact on society are explored in the course. A number of topics of current interest such as, nuclear energy, world energy supplies, pollution, global warming, climate change, and possible solutions to the energy crisis are discussed in detail. This course gives students who are majoring in the arts, humanities, business, law, and biomedical sciences an introduction to modern ideas in Physics and to see how these ideas affect our day-to-day lives. (2 lecture hours a week.) Does not count towards the major requirements for a degree in the Department of Physics.

PHYS-2200.EM Fields and Photons
Electrostatic fields and potentials. Charges and capacitance. Currents and conduction in solids. Magnetic fields; induction; introduction to Maxwell equations, electromagnetic waves, and photons; the photoelectric effect. (Prerequisite: PHYS-1410 or equivalent.) (3 lecture, 3 laboratory hours a week.)

PHYS-2250.Optics
Geometrical optics: review of laws of reflection and refraction; lenses and mirrors (matrix optics); stops, optical systems, aberrations. Introduction to wave optics; interferometry, diffraction, polarization, Fresnel equations, elements of dispersion theory. (Prerequisites: PHYS-1410 and MATH-1730.) (3 lecture, 3 laboratory hours a week.)

PHYS-2500. Intermediate Mechanics
Classical mechanics at the intermediate (second-year) level: Newton's Laws and consequences – Galilean invariance, conservation theorems, applications to rectilinear motion and motion in two/three dimensions; introduction to noninertial reference frames, particularly in rectilinear motion; driven oscillators with damping; central forces, the Kepler problem; dynamics of rigid bodies – planar motion; special relativity – Lorentz transformations, relativistic kinematics and dynamics. (Prerequisites: PHYS-1410 and MATH-1730, or equivalent; Recommended: PHYS-1500.) (3 lecture hours and 1 tutorial hour per week.)

PHYS-2980.Co-op Work Term I
Supervised experience in an approved career-related setting with a focus on the application of theory and the development of transferable skills. The co-op work experience is designed to provide students with an enriched learning opportunity to integrate academic theory and concepts in an applied setting. (Prerequisite: Student must be enrolled in a co-operative education program. Offered on a Pass/non-Pass basis. Supervised practicum requires the successful completion of a minimum of 420 hours. Students who do not pass the course can not continue in the co-op program.)

PHYS-3100.Quantum Physics and Chemistry
Classical and quantum physics, relativistic physics, black-body radiation, photoelectric effect, Compton scattering, atomic structure, Schroedinger equation, particle in a box, harmonic oscillator, conduction in solids; semiconductor and superconductor devices. (Prerequisites: MATH-2780 and MATH-2790 or equivalents.) (3 lecture, 3 laboratory hours a week.)

PHYS-3105.Quantum Physics and Chemistry
(Same as PHYS-3100 without the laboratory.) Classical and quantum physics, black-body radiation, photoelectric effect, Compton scattering, atomic structure, Schroedinger equation, particle in a box, harmonic oscillator, conduction in solids; semiconductor and superconductor devices. (Prerequisites: MATH-2780 and MATH-2790 or equivalents.) (3 lecture hours a week.)

PHYS-3110.Atomic and Molecular Spectra
Introduction to atomic and molecular spectroscopy, hydrogen and helium atoms, perturbation theory, isotopes; introduction to nuclear physics. (Prerequisites: PHYS-3100 or PHYS-3105, MATH-2780, and MATH-2790, or equivalents.) (3 lecture, 3 laboratory hours a week.)

PHYS-3115.Atomic and Molecular Spectra
(Same as PHYS-3110 without the laboratory.) Introduction to atomic and molecular spectroscopy, hydrogen and helium atoms, perturbation theory, isotopes; introduction to nuclear physics (Prerequisites: PHYS-3100 or PHYS-3105, MATH-2780, and MATH-2790 or equivalents.) (3 lecture hours a week.)

PHYS-3200. Electromagnetic Theory
Classical electrodynamics, focusing on stationary phenomena: electrostatics and magnetostatics in vacuum; potential theory, multipole expansion; electrostatics and magnetostatics in ponderable media; boundary value problems; electromagnetic induction. (Prerequisites: MATH-2780, PHYS-2200. Corequisite: MATH-2790.) (3 lecture hours per week.)

PHYS-3210. Electromagnetic Waves
Classical electrodynamics, focusing on dynamic phenomena: Maxwell’s equations and the potential formulation; electromagnetic waves – free space, waves in matter, interfaces, guided waves; Lienard-Wiechert potentials; electromagnetic radiation; electrodynamics and special relativity. (Prerequisites: PHYS-3200 and MATH-3550.) (3 lecture hours and 3 laboratory/tutorial hours per week.)

PHYS-3500. Classical Mechanics
Classical mechanics, focusing on further developments of formalism and more complex systems: calculus of variations; Lagrangian formalism and an introduction to the Hamiltonian formalism; systems of particles; noninertial reference frames – rotating coordinate systems, centrifugal and Coriolis forces; three-dimensional rigid body motion – inertia tensor, Euler angles, equations of motion; coupled oscillations; continuum mechanics. (Prerequisites: PHYS-2500, MATH-2780, and MATH-2790 or equivalents.) (3 lecture hours and 1 tutorial hour per week.)

PHYS-3700.Introduction to Medical Physics
Physical principles and experimental techniques applied to medicine and biology. Applications of x-rays and gamma rays in medical diagnosis and therapy. Physical principles of lasers, ultrasound, and magnetic fields in mapping structures. Physical techniques for the diagnosis and therapy of the human body. This course is intended to be of interest to students in Biology and Chemistry/Biochemistry, as well as Physics. (Prerequisite: PHYS-1400 and PHYS-1410, or the consent of the instructor.) (3 lecture hours a week)

PHYS-3980.Co-op Work Term II
Supervised experience in an approved career-related setting with a focus on the application of theory and the development of transferable skills. The co-op work experience is designed to provide students with an enriched learning opportunity to integrate academic theory and concepts in an applied setting. (Prerequisite: Student must be enrolled in a co-operative education program. Offered on a Pass/non-Pass basis. Supervised practicum requires the successful completion of a minimum of 420 hours. Students who do not pass the course can not continue in the co-op program.)

PHYS-4000.Technical Communication Skills
Introductory lectures and workshops on technical writing and instruction, followed by supervised instruction of first-year Physics students in PHYS-1500, and projects in writing resumes and technical manuals and in preparing a multimedia computer module for a problem area in physics instruction. The computer module can employ any suitable combination of Maple, C++, Visual Basic, HTML, Java. (Prerequisite: PHYS-1500.) (2 lecture, 2 laboratory honours a week.

PHYS-4100.Quantum Mechanics I
Probability amplitudes and transformations; operators and physical observables; symmetries and conservation theorems; time-development operator and Dyson expansion; two-state systems, density matrices; perturbation theory and the variational method; identical particles, spin, the Thomas-Fermi atom. (Prerequisites: PHYS-3100 or PHYS-3115, PHYS-3500, and MATH-3550 or consent of instructor.) (3 lecture hours a week.)

PHYS-4130.Introduction to Statistical Mechanics
Thermal equilibrium, diffusive equilibrium; Boltzmann and Gibbs distributions, canonical and grand canonical partition functions; thermodynamics from statistical mechanics, entropy, work, heat; Helmholtz free energy, Gibbs free energy, enthalpy, Gibbs-Duhem relation, equations of state, Maxwell relations, response functions; Planck distribution and thermal radiation, Fermi-Dirac distribution and the Fermi gas, Bose-Einstein distribution and the Bose gas, ideal gas; chemical reactions; binary mixtures; phase transitions; elementary kinetic theory. (Prerequisites: CHEM-2400, PHYS-3100 or PHYS-3105, PHYS-3110 or PHYS-3115, and CHEM-3400 (for Chemistry students only).)

PHYS-4160.Condensed-Matter Physics
Elements of crystallography, crystal diffraction, reciprocal lattices, lattice dynamics and thermal properties of solids, phonons, solution of Schroedinger equation in periodic potential, band theory, Fermi surfaces of metals and semiconductors, optical properties of dielectrics. (Prerequisite: PHYS-3100 or PHYS-3105 or consent of instructor.) (3 lecture hours a week.)

PHYS-4200.Classical Electrodynamics
Conservation laws, Bremsstrahlung scattering of radiation, multipole radiations fields, Liťnard-Wiechert potentials, Green functions, radiation reaction, Lorentz-Dirac equation, radiation from time-dependent currents. (Prerequisites: PHYS-3200 and PHYS-3210.) (3 lecture hours a week.)

PHYS-4250.Design and Application of Lasers
Stimulated emission, rate equation approach to amplification and output power calculations; Gaussian beams, stable and unstable resonators, Q-switching, mode-locking and cavity dumping, ruby, Nd:YAG and other solid-state lasers, semi-conductor, gas and dye lasers. (Prerequisites: PHYS-3110 or PHYS-2200, and PHYS-2250, or three years of Electrical Engineering or Engineering Materials, or equivalent.) (3 lecture hours a week.

PHYS-4600.Special Topics in Physics
Advanced topics in contemporary physics. (Prerequisite: to be determined according to the topic.) (May be given as a seminar course , or as a directed, self-study course.) (May be repeated for credit when the topic is different.)

PHYS-4670. Special Techniques in Health Physics
This course consists of a variety of specialized topics involving the applications of the principles of physics to the study and characterization of living tissues, and the detection and treatment of pathological conditions. Topics will include the applications of acoustic microscopy, computational and statistical methods in medical physics, nanotechnology, and the interaction of ionizing radiation with living tissue. Course may be repeated when the topic is different. (Prerequisite: PHYS-3700, or the consent of the instructor.) (3 lecture hours a week.)

PHYS-4700. Radiological Physics
Radioactive decay schemes, interaction of photons with matter, linear and mass attenuation coefficients, stopping power for charged particles, radiation detection and instrumentation. The course will include clinical experience. (Prerequisite: PHYS-3700, or the consent of the instructor.) (3 lecture, 3 lab hours a week.)

PHYS-4710. Introduction to Medical Imaging
The course will cover a broad range of modern imaging techniques and their theoretical foundations, such as ultrasound, planar x-ray imaging, computer tomography (CT) imaging, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), and radionuclide molecular imaging. The course will include practical laboratory experience at the University of Windsor, and at the Windsor Regional Cancer Centre. (Prerequisite: PHYS-3700, or the consent of the instructor.) (3 lecture, 3 lab hours a week.)

PHYS-4900.Research
Design, researching, execution and managing, analysis, and reporting (Written and oral) of a supervised physics project in a recognized research laboratory, on- or off-campus. This is a problem-based course with emphasis on team work. Students must present three seminars discussing their research project: on background, on the research plan, and a final seminar accompanying a written report containing the main results, conclusions, and suggestions for further work. With departmental approval, the research may be applied toward partial fulfillment of the M.Sc. degree. (Prerequisites: PHYS-1500.) (1 lecture hour, 12 laboratory hours per week over two terms) (6.0 credit hours).

PHYS-4980.Co-op Work Term III
Supervised experience in an approved career-related setting with a focus on the application of theory and the development of transferable skills. The co-op work experience is designed to provide students with an enriched learning opportunity to integrate academic theory and concepts in an applied setting. (Prerequisite: Student must be enrolled in a co-operative education program. Offered on a Pass/non-Pass basis. Supervised practicum requires the successful completion of a minimum of 420 hours. Students who do not pass the course can not continue in the co-op program.)