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Undergraduate Calendar
Winter 2018

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SCHOOL OF CREATIVE ARTS

VISUAL ARTS: COURSES

Not all courses listed will necessarily be offered each year. Studio courses are either three hours a week or six hours a week, depending on the medium and level of study. See below for details. Art History courses are three hours a week unless otherwise indicated. Prerequisites for all Art History courses are waived for non-Visual Arts majors.

6 hour Studio Courses: 27-105, 27-106, 27-107, 27-108, 27-203, 27-213, 27-223, 27-233, 27-245, 27-303, 27-313, 27-343, 27-345, and 27-386.

3 hour Studio Courses: 27-253, 27-290, 27-326, 27-333, 27-346, 27-347, 27-348, 27-383, 27-384, and 27-385.

27-105. Studio Practice and Ideas/Space
An investigation of the principles, vocabulary and concepts of space-based art, including but not limited to sculpture and installation. Using traditional and contemporary materials, processes and practices, students will gain knowledge and experience through the exploration of the creative possibilities of three-dimensional space. (Lab Fees may apply.)

27-106. Studio Practice and Ideas/Image
An introduction to the fundamental skills and critical concepts of visual perception and production common to all areas of 2 dimensional image-making. Basic principles of composition and design, light and pigment-based colour theory, as these apply to painting, photo-based processes, and print production. Their use and application will be will be explored within the contemporary art context. Class projects may involve inter-disciplinarity between these media. Studio assignments are combined with related critical theory, historical practice and current strategies.

27-107. Studio Practice and Ideas/Drawing
An investigation of a variety of drawing processes, materials and concepts in a studio environment that fosters exploration. (Lab fees may apply.)

27-108. Studio Practice and Ideas/Time-Based
An investigation of the principles, vocabulary and concepts of time-based arts including digital media. Students will gain knowledge of the creative possibilities of emerging technologies and will develop a basic understanding of methods, tools and techniques of time-based media.

The following courses are open to Visual Arts students only.

27-203. Introductory Drawing
Media, techniques, vocabulary, and concepts of drawing, including the human figure and other subject matter. Development of drawing skills with exposure to more complex drawing situations, approaches, and points of view. Emphasis on a variety of materials (traditional and non-traditional). (Prerequisites: 27-105, 27-106, 27-107, 27-108.) (Lab fees may apply.)

27-213. Introductory Painting
Introduction to traditional and contemporary painting concerns, problems in rendering three-dimensional form in space and organization of the two-dimensional surface. (Prerequisites: 27-105, 27-106, 27-107, 27-108.) (Lab fees may apply.)

27-223. Introductory Printmaking-Intaglio
Introductory and intermediate techniques of contemporary printmaking practice are taught through Intaglio. The techniques of etching, engraving and monoprints are emphasized. (Prerequisites: 27-105, 27-106, 27-107, 27-108.) (Lab fees may apply.)

27-233. Introductory Sculpture
An introduction to the various concepts and processes of contemporary sculpture practice. Issues will be addressed through group discussion and practical application. (Prerequisites: 27-105, 27-106, 27-107, 27-108.) (Lab fees may apply.)

27-243. Introductory Time-Based Art
An investigation of the principles, vocabulary and concepts of time-based art. Emphasis is on exploring the potential of video for art projects as well as for community action in an experimental and critical environment. Assignments and screenings will stimulate students to explore issues inherent to time-based strategies in contemporary art as well as give a background to its brief history. (Prerequisites: 27-108 or permission of the instructor.) (Lab fees may apply.)

27-245. Digital Media and Design
This course introduces students to the tools used to create art in virtual space, skills that assist in cross-over activity between art and design, and the history and investigation of the social, cultural and aesthetic issues pertinent to digital art making. (Prerequisites: 27-105, 27-106, 27-107, 27-108.) (Lab fees may apply.)

27-253. Introductory Photography
This introductory course in film and chemical photographic processes provides an opportunity for students to explore techniques and concepts within the medium of photography. Students will learn the basic technical skills of operating cameras, processing film, and making black and white prints, through a series of concerns specific to photography. (Prerequisites: 27-105, 27-106, 27-107, 27-108; Prerequisites for Majors in the Combined Communication, Media and Film and Visual Arts (Film and Media Arts: 27-106, 27-107, 27-108.) (Also offered as Communication, Media and Film course 40-205.) (Students must have a 35mm adjustable film camera to complete this course.) (Lab fees may apply.)

27-255. From 2D to 3D - Playing with Space
How do we experience space? What are the elements that animate and activate a space? How have artists used space to communicate and investigate current issues within culture and society? From subtle cues such as temperature and smell, to the more obvious such as colour, texture, sound and construction, students will investigate the sensory, narrative and critical aspects of installation where space itself becomes our medium. In this studio-based course, students will bridge the gap between 2D image and 3D structure as an introduction to the processes used by artists to explore and manipulate space. Students will also look at current debates surrounding installation art and the gallery as “white cube.” This course is not limited to any particular medium, and students may respond in any medium offered within the School of Creative Arts. (Prerequisite: one “27-” course at the 100-level.)

27-263. Sonic Art
An introduction to techniques for creating sound-based art, including sound recording, editing and processing, sample-based timbre design, soundscape composition, and MIDI-based electronica. (Pre-requisite: 32-102 or 27-108 or 32-112 or permission of the instructor.) (Also offered as 32-232 Music Technology.) (Lab fees may apply.)

27-285. Learning by Living in an International Urban Setting
This course develops the capability to describe and reflect upon the everyday rhythms and challenges of learning in a new culture and urban environment and finding expressive ways to communicate the experiences and challenges of learning to others. As an exploration of living in an Italian city, students will examine films, literature, music, theatre, or other expressive forms that reflect Italian and European urban life. Students will write weekly blogs about their own experiences, perceptions and understanding of Italian culture and living abroad. Using old and new media, they will engage in a regular process of designing, drafting, and redrafting stories and relating interesting experiences from their time in Volterra that may be shared with their classmates, colleagues, family, and friends within an electronic portfolio. As managers of their own e-portfolios, students will develop a learning record designed to exceed the limits of the course. Regular assessment of the e-portfolio and its entries may be carried out by a small team of faculty at Windsor and facilitated by the Windsor faculty resident at Volterra. (Note: This course is available only to students participating in the Volterra, Italy, study abroad arts program. Permission of the Instructor is required.) (Prerequisites: 01-150 and 01-151.) (Also offered as 28-285.)

27-290. Introductory Photography: Digital
An applied photography course concentrating on digital imaging processes, including camera operation for high quality digital image capture, colour use, image processing, and printing. The course offers an introduction to the elements of digital photography, concentrating on digital image capture, image processing using Adobe Photoshop and Bridge, colour management, and an introduction to scanning and printing. Various types of digital cameras are discussed. Critiques, presentations and readings assist students to expand their analytical and creative skills. (Lab fees may apply.) (Pre-requisites: 27-105, 27-106, 27-107, 27-108; Prerequisites for Majors in the Combined Communication, Media and Film and Visual Arts (Film and Media Arts): 27-106, 27-107, 27-108.)

27-303. Drawing
Advanced problems in drawing, emphasizing individual directions, concepts, and various media. (Prerequisite: 27-203.) (May be repeated for credit.) (Lab fees may apply.)

27-313. Painting
Development of the concepts and painting skills encountered in 27-213. Exploration of the creative potential, range, and flexibility of non-traditional techniques, forms and media. (Prerequisites: 27-213.) (May be repeated for credit.) (Lab fees may apply.)

27-318. Alabaster Sculpture
This course is a complete experience in the art and 2000-year tradition of alabaster sculpture. Students will have a unique opportunity to work with stone valued above others for its decorative qualities. The students will work under the direction of Volterra alabaster masters in a sculpture studio on forming their creative ideas and becoming familiar with the tools. Students will typically start with a clay model; discuss the design and technique with the teacher and move on to carve a block of stone. The students will also visit local quarries, artisan shops and galleries to learn the potential of the material and the energy behind the local tradition. (Note: This course is available only to students participating in the Volterra, Italy study abroad arts program. Course 27-105 is recommended as preparatory course and/or Permission of the Sculpture Area Coordinator is required.)

27-320. Contemporary Italian Culture
This course helps students visiting as study abroad participants in Volterra, Italy, to become a part of the local community, develop a few tools to learn about Italian culture, and gain basic language knowledge to communicate in Italian in everyday situations. Students will learn to negotiate participation in art sites and cultural activities, become engaged in the cultural life of the city and other nearby centres, communicate appropriately in situations such as introducing themselves, exchanging personal information, asking and giving directions and discussing daily routines. The students will explore the socio-cultural context in which the language is used. They learn to communicate in simple tasks requiring a direct exchange of information on familiar topics. The course is a catalyst for cultural immersion during the Volterra program, but it is also a foundation to encourage further systematic studies in culture, social, and language subject areas. (Note: This course is available and highly recommended only to students participating in the Volterra, Italy, study abroad arts program.)

27-326. Printmaking
Continued development of contemporary printmaking practice. Further investigation of process-oriented issue-based image making, with emphasis on student's chosen direction. Students are encouraged to expand their analytical, experimental and creative skills. (May be repeated for credit.) (Prerequisites: one 200-level printmaking course.) (Lab fees may apply.)

27-333. Sculpture
An in-depth study of concepts and processes as they pertain to contemporary sculpture practice. Issues will be addressed through group discussion and practical application. (Prerequisites: 27-233.) (May be repeated for credit.) (Lab fees may apply.)

27-343. Time-Based Art
This course explores time-based media in more complex and demanding projects than 27-243. Projects may include experimental video, animation, video installation, audio projects, documentary and performance art. This studio course encourages the thoughtful engagement of complex ideas through visual and/or audio means within issues in visual culture and contemporary art practices. (Prerequisite: 27-243 or 27-263 or 27-245) (May be repeated for credit.) (Lab fees may apply.)

27-345. Digital Media and Interactivity
This course introduces students to the basic concepts and tools of interactive multimedia as a creative medium. Students will experiment with interactive structures for creative content development using digital images, sound, text, etc. for disk-based delivery environments. The acquisition of the technical knowledge will be grounded within an exploration of aesthetic and social issues. (May be repeated for credit.) (Prerequisite: any of the following: 27-245, 27-243, 27-263, 27-290, 27-343, 27-347) (Lab fees may apply.)

27-346. Documentary Photography
This course is a concentrated investigation of the historic codification of the photograph as document and the current implications for this form of representation. Issues of photographic objectivity and truth will be examined in relation to the role of documentary photography as a tool of political and social advocacy. Students will produce a body of photographic work, with learning supported by lectures and critiques. (Lab fees may apply.) (Pre-requisites: 27-253 or 27-290)

27-347. Photography: Sequence and Context
This course is an intensive investigation into photographic representation. The course will concentrate on the properties of individual photographs and the meanings created when they are combined into groups, series and sequences. Photographic books, slide shows, magazine layouts, blogs, exhibitions, and installations are explored as means of developing visual fluency and coherent self-expression. Critical readings and class discussions will enlist a wide range of theoretical approaches. Students will create an independent body of work based on course material. (Lab fees may apply.) (Pre-requisites: 27-253 or 27-290)

27-348. Photography: Concept and Production
An applied exploration of current critical issues in photography. Students will explore, discuss and produce photographic work that addresses the current theme of the course. Themes will vary but may include: Decoding the Portrait, the City and the Land, the Vernacular, the Street and the Studio, Space and Place, Representation and Appropriation, and Gender and Landscapes. Students will produce a body of work and learning will be supported by lectures and critiques. (Lab fees may apply.) (Prerequisites: 27-253 or 27-290)

27-363. Advanced Sonic Art
An in-depth study of techniques for creating advanced sound-based art, including sound synthesis, electroacoustic music composition, sound installation, and soundtracks for film and video. (Pre-requisite: 27-263 or 32-232 or permission of the instructor.) (Also offered as 32-332 Advanced Music Technology.) (May be repeated for credit.) (Lab fees may apply.)

27-365. Independent Studio
Individual work on specific projects under the guidance of an instructor. (Prerequisite: one 300-numbered studio course in the subject desired and consent of instructor.) (May be repeated for credit.) (Lab fees may apply.)

27-371. Art in Public Spaces
This studio practice course investigates concepts and processes by which artists work in public spaces. It considers intersections of ideas and disciplines that humanize the built environment while challenging and invigorating public spaces. Students will research, propose, and develop works of public art for civic squares, sculpture parks, back alleys, neighbourhoods, parking spaces, provincial parks, public beaches, lakes, rivers or other areas. Where possible, projects may also be executed in specific public spaces. Through location-driven research processes, students will uncover the uniqueness of space and place by exploring and exploiting each proposed location. This course is not limited to any particular medium, and students may respond in any medium offered within the School of Creative Arts. (Prerequisite: one “27-” course at the 200-level.)

27-380. Visual Art Internship
Practical work experience in organizations such as art centres, galleries, artists' studios, community organizations, and arts-related professional businesses. (Offered on a Pass/Non-Pass basis.) (Restricted to B.F.A. Visual Arts Majors and to Visual Art Combined Honours students with an average of 75% (B) or better, and with permission of the Visual Arts Internship Coordinator.) (100 hours total, 80 hours working in the community.) Students are signed-in to the course by the Coordinator, rather than registering on-line. May not be repeated for credit.

27-383. Inter-Media Practices - Processes
A studio/seminar course providing the basis for an interwoven art practice in an interdisciplinary context is developed through a critical approach to materials, issues, and art-making. Required readings/research pertinent to current issues are discussed in relation to studio production. Studio production integrating two or more Visual Arts' disciplines is expected. (Prerequisites: 27-203, two 200 level studios, and three 200 or 300 studios.)

27-384. Inter-Media Practices - Topics
A practice-oriented seminar focusing on topics central to the interdisciplinary art practice in contemporary social and cultural contexts. Issues within areas such as history, gender, race and technology are considered within the context of varying perspectives. Students' studio production is challenged within a contemporary interdisciplinary environment. The students' individual production will be expected to be situated within the larger art and social context. (Prerequisites: 27-203, two 200 level studios, and three 200 or 300 studios.)

27-385. Green Corridor
A cross-disciplinary course that investigates and proposes various strategies for the creation and realization of public environmentally-aware art projects. Course work contributes to the creation of a City of Windsor/University of Windsor Green Corridor. Projects are generated in conjunction with community-based research and involvement with special interest groups. Students will be involved in the research and development of concepts evolving from discussions and participation in series of lecture/seminars. Areas of investigation during the course will include environmental study and impact, the social and political functions of public art in contemporary culture, the public creative process, the importance of public education in the development of community-based projects, marketing of public art and environmental awareness. (Prerequisites: at least Semester 5 and in good standing, or graduate student.) (May be repeated for credit with permission of instructor.)

27-386. Bioart: Contemporary Art and the Life Sciences
This course is a visual art and science crossover lab intended for students from various disciplines to foster interdisciplinary exploration of the intersections between art and the life sciences through hands-on laboratory protocols, critical readings, theoretical writing, and the production of contemporary artwork. No previous experience in the biological sciences is required. (Prerequisites: One 200 level studio) (May be repeated for credit.) (Lab fees may apply.) (Students outside of the School of Visual Arts require permission of the instructor to enrol.)

27-390. Studies in the Visual Arts
Special projects, topics or cross-disciplinary undertakings in the Visual Arts, organized periodically. Specific information on course content will be available from Visual Arts (Prerequisites: consent of instructor.) (May be repeated for credit.) (Lab fees may apply.)

27-480. Studio Practice l
The advanced student is given wide range to work in a chosen medium to synthesize accumulated knowledge and experience with individual critique provided by the instructor. (Prerequisites: 14 studio courses which must include 27-383 or 27-384 plus three 300-level courses in the same or related area.) (double credit weight)

27-481. Studio Practice ll
The advanced student is given wide range to work in a chosen medium to synthesize accumulated knowledge and experience with individual critique provided by the instructor. (Prerequisite: 27-480.) (double credit weight)

27-490. Seminar
Investigation of professional practice and contemporary developments in the arts may include group discussion, visits to galleries, projects, lectures, written assignments. (Restricted to students registered in 400-level Studio Practice courses in the B.F.A. program only.) (Lab fees may apply.)

27-491. Critical Issues
Development of an understanding of issues which have been addressed by contemporary artists and critics contextualized in history and artistic practices with an emphasis on individual students' concerns. (Restricted to students registered in 400-level Studio Practice courses or permission of the instructor.) (Lab fees may apply.)

ART HISTORY

Not all courses listed will necessarily be offered each year. Prerequisites for all Art History courses are waived for non-Visual Arts majors. Art History courses are three hours a week unless otherwise indicated.

28-150. Contemporary Visual Culture
A critical investigation of the visual imagery and artifacts of contemporary culture. Drawing upon examples from TV, advertising, cinema, cyber culture, architecture, design and art, students are introduced to such concepts as spectacle, kitsch, simulacrum, hypertext paradigm. (Lab fees may apply.)

28-214. Survey of Art History: Ancient to Medieval
History of art from prehistoric through medieval, with an introduction to composition, the language of the plastic arts and its relationship to culture. (Students cannot receive credit for both 28-114 and 28-214.)

28-215. Survey of Art History: Renaissance to Modern
History of art from Italian Renaissance to the twentieth century, with emphasis on the influence of social and philosophical ideas. (Students cannot receive credit for both 28-115 and 28-215.)

28-220. The Planned City as a Work of Art
The city as a grand plan has always been both an idea and an ideal in the West. This course will trace the development of the city envisioned as a single, unified construct, often with a specific purpose in mind. From the ancient world of Athens and Rome, to Medieval Siena and Renaissance Florence through to the 19th century in Europe and North America, these great urban visions continue to influence how we live. (Prerequisites: 28-214 and 28-215.)

28-245. Modern Art
This course will introduce students to the development of modern art from the late nineteenth century to the middle of the twentieth century. The course will cover the relationship between the artistic movements of the early twentieth century and the cultural and political ideas that informed them. This course will trace the rise of abstraction in the early part of the twentieth century as well as subsequent developments in Dada and Surrealism. (Prerequisite: 28-150 and 28-215 for majors; or semester four standing for non-majors)

28-250. Stories of the City
This course examines how cities are imagined, dreamed, planned, described, and remembered. Students explore urban cultures, legends, scenes, and structures to discern how the spaces and rhythms of city life are expressed through its literature, visual arts, films, sounds, architectures and other media. While the course addresses urban disasters and achievements, it also investigates the everydayness of urban existence. Classes respond with theoretical, creative and community-based research projects that foster conversation and involvement with citizens. (Prerequisites: One of: 01-28-150, 01-32-126, 02-40-101, or permission from the instructor.)

28-285. Learning by Living in an International Urban Setting
This course develops the capability to describe and reflect upon the everyday rhythms and challenges of learning in a new culture and urban environment and finding expressive ways to communicate the experiences and challenges of learning to others. As an exploration of living in an Italian city, students will examine films, literature, music, theatre, or other expressive forms that reflect Italian and European urban life. Students will write weekly blogs about their own experiences, perceptions and understanding of Italian culture and living abroad. Using old and new media, they will engage in a regular process of designing, drafting, and redrafting stories and relating interesting experiences from their time in Volterra that may be shared with their classmates, colleagues, family, and friends within an electronic portfolio. As managers of their own e-portfolios, students will develop a learning record designed to exceed the limits of the course. Regular assessment of the e-portfolio and its entries may be carried out by a small team of faculty at Windsor and facilitated by the Windsor faculty resident at Volterra. (Note: This course is available only to students participating in the Volterra, Italy, study abroad arts program. Permission of the Instructor is required.) (Prerequisites: 01-150 and 01-151.) (Also offered as 27-285.)

28-301. Northern Renaissance Art
The art of Northern Europe during the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries with particular emphasis upon the Franco-Flemish and German painting traditions and the beginnings of Graphic Art. (Prerequisites for Visual Art majors: 28-214 and 28-215.)

28-307. Renaissance Art I
The Renaissance in Italy during the fifteenth century with special attention given to the architecture, sculpture, and painting of Florence. (Prerequisites for Visual Arts majors: 28-214 and 28-215.)

28-308. Renaissance Art II
The art of the Renaissance in Italy with a major consideration of the architecture, sculpture, and painting produced in Rome and Venice during the sixteenth century. (Prerequisites for Visual Arts majors: 28-214 and 28-215.)

28-320. Contemporary Italian Culture
This course helps students visiting as study abroad participants in Volterra, Italy, to become a part of the local community, develop a few tools to learn about Italian culture, and gain basic language knowledge to communicate in Italian in everyday situations. Students will learn to negotiate participation in art sites and cultural activities, become engaged in the cultural life of the city and other nearby centres, communicate appropriately in situations such as introducing themselves, exchanging personal information, asking and giving directions and discussing daily routines. The students will explore the socio-cultural context in which the language is used. They learn to communicate in simple tasks requiring a direct exchange of information on familiar topics. The course is a catalyst for cultural immersion during the Volterra program, but it is also a foundation to encourage further systematic studies in culture, social, and language subject areas. (Note: This course is available and highly recommended only to students participating in the Volterra, Italy, study abroad arts program.)

28-331. Nineteenth-Century European Art
An analysis of the major movements in European painting during the nineteenth century including Neo-Classicism, Romanticism, Realism, Impressionism, and Post-Impressionism. (Prerequisites for Visual Arts majors: 28-214 and 28-215.)

28-337. Later Medieval Art
An examination of the evolution of architecture and sculpture in Europe during the Romanesque and Gothic periods. (Prerequisites for Visual Arts majors: 28-214 and 28-215.)

28-338. Islamic Art
An examination of important trends in the artistic development of the Muslim era, including the Umayyad, Tulunid, Fatamid, Seljuk, Mongol, Nasrid, Mamluk, Ottoman, Timurid, Safvid, and Mughal dynasties. (Prerequisites for Visual Arts majors: 28-214 and 28-215.)

28-339. Japanese Art
The architecture, sculpture, and painting of Japan and the relationship of Japanese culture to continental artistic developments. (Prerequisites for Visual Arts majors: 28-214 and 28-215.)

28-340. Art of India
A general survey of Indian architecture, sculpture, and painting with particular emphasis on the development of the Buddha Image. (Prerequisites for Visual Arts majors: 28-214 and 28-215.)

28-341. Art of China
An examination on the architecture, sculpture, and painting of China from the Shang through the Ching dynasties. (Prerequisites for Visual Arts majors: 28-214 and 28-215.)

28-342. The Development of American Art
A study of the art and architecture created in the United States from Colonial times to the twentieth century. (Prerequisites for Visual Arts majors: 28-214 and 28-215.)

28-345. Art of the Twentieth Century-Post-1940
An examination of the sources, movements, and major figures contributing to twentieth century art in Europe and North America from 1940 on. (Prerequisites for Visual Arts majors: 28-150, 28-214 and 28-215.)

28-352: Techniques and Technologies of Urban Life
This course examines the relationship between technologies, the built environments of cities, and the ways in which we experience, remember, connect and interact in urban spaces, places, and times. Drawing on cultural theories and creative practices, students develop conceptual tools for the analysis of different technologies, media, cultural artifacts, spaces, and social practices, as well as creative research methodologies that use old and new technologies to question and document urban and suburban life. (Prerequisites: One of: 28-150, 28-214, 28-215, 32-126, 40-101, or permission from the instructor.)

28-355. Curating as Cultural Practice
This course will examine the expanding variety of models of curatorial practice in an interdisciplinary context. Students will acquire first hand experience in the conceptualization, proposal and realization of social and cultural events as creative practice that engages research and conceptual knowledge in new ways. It may also be understood as a form of social practice that is invested in public interaction. Class projects will be designed to frame contemporary issues and to communicate with new audiences. (Pre-requisites: For BFA or BA Visual Arts/Art History students: 28-150, 28-214, 28-215. For majors in FAHSS: 01/02-110 or 01/02-200). (May be repeated twice for credit.)

28-360. History of Photography
This course addresses the history of photography from a social and aesthetic perspective. With the invention of photography in the nineteenth century, debates about subjectivity, truth, memory and difference were radically re-framed. This course follows the emergence of photography in 1839 through its development in the twentieth century, exploring its documentary and aesthetic roles in relation to specific socio-historical contexts. The significance of technological innovations to image creation will also be addressed.

28-362. Contemporary Issues in Photography
This course will provide an examination of the theoretical debates and key writings on photography in the modern and contemporary contexts. Critical areas to be discussed include photographic realism, documentary and narrative forms, digital reconfiguration, intermediality, gender and identity, space and place. The role of the photograph will be explored in relation to conditions in contemporary art and society to provide a broader context for interrogating photographic image-making.

28-370. Media Art Histories
This course surveys artistic practices and theoretical models that have emerged from the intersecting histories of art, media, science, and technology. These interwoven histories are explored through case studies of visual artists, filmmakers, musicians, and architects working between disciplinary and technological boundaries. Students will investigate ways in which these artists and practitioners have developed strategies across time to promote, test, evade, and challenge the social roles and forms of emerging media and technology. (Prerequisites: 28-150 or permission from the instructor.)

28-391. Contemporary Architecture
A survey of the roots of contemporary architectural theory through an examination of representative structures since the Industrial Revolution. Students will be introduced to those individuals who have played a central role in the development of architectural thought in North America. (Prerequisites for Visual Arts majors: 28-214 and 28-215.) (3 lecture hours a week.)

28-400. Directed Individual Studies
The Independent Study course in Media Art Histories and Visual Culture is reserved for exceptional students to pursue a research paper under the supervision of a full-time faculty member in the Media Art Histories and Visual Culture area. This course requires that students formulate new research questions that stem from previous course work and to write a substantial essay (minimum 15 - 20 pages) that focuses on an historical or theoretical issue in art, architecture, the built environment, and visual or sonic media. Students must apply to the MAH/VC area coordinator at least two months prior to the beginning of semester to be considered. Applications will be considered on the basis of the ability of senior course offerings and the availability of faculty members in the MAH/VC area. All applicants must have demonstrated superior academic ability in similar courses at the 300 level and above. An 80% average in Media Art Histories and Visual Culture courses will be required for this course. Prerequisites 28-150, 28-214, 28-215 and a 300 numbered course in the subject area. This course cannot be repeated for credit.

28-450. Border Culture
This course addresses the role of borders in contemporary global culture as both physical boundaries and affective conditions. In the context of the Windsor-Detroit border, students from the University of Windsor will exchange viewpoints based upon the experience of living in a border culture. Seminars and field trips will take up the topic of borders from a number of perspectives and contexts. Students will look at historical and contemporary ideas about borders that have been articulated in various disciplines: from political theory and cultural geography, to urban planning, art, literature, architectural and spatial theory. (Open to majors and non-majors.) (Prerequisites: 28-150 and semester 4 standing.) (Also offered as 40-450)

28-452: Urban Ecologies
This course examines cities as a complex field of cultural, social, linguistic, technological, and architectural objects, activities, relationships, and experiences. Students investigate different ecological models of city life to contemplate tensions between the active and static, material and immaterial, porous and impermeable character of cities. In classroom seminars and research practice, students discuss and debate a range of theoretical models and develop creative strategies to probe the natural, physical, artistic, cultural, acoustic, and medial ecologies of cities. (Prerequisites: 28-250 or 28-352, or permission from the instructor.)

28-453. History of Detroit Architecture
Since its founding in 1701, Detroit has reflected all major movements in North American architecture. This course will examine the evolution of architectural styles in Detroit beginning with the pre-American French Colonial, moving through the many revival styles of the 19th century, Beaux Arts, Art Deco and ending with Post Modernism and recent additions to the city's skyline. Course includes both lectures and on-site architectural visits. (Prerequisites: 28-214 and 28-215.)

28-456. Proseminar
A Proseminar course based on group encounters with particular studies in the History of Art, which will be considered by means of readings, discussions, papers, and museum trips. May be repeated for credit with permission. For specific topics consult a program advisor in Visual Arts. (Prerequisites: 28-150, 28-214, 28-215, and consent of the instructor.)

VISUAL ART AND THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT (VABE): COURSES

36-110. Architectural Design I
An introduction to the fundamental skills and critical concepts of visual perception and production common to all areas of 2 dimensional image-making. Basic principles of composition and design, light and pigment-based colour theory, as these apply to painting, photo-based processes, and print production. Their use and application will be will be explored within the contemporary art context. Class projects may involve interdisciplinarity between these media. Studio assignments are combined with related critical theory, historical practice and current strategies. The lab is intended to introduce students to design concept of form, space, composition, in two and three dimension, and how they relate to human experiences. Students are introduced to the principles of design and the design process as a foundation for architectural design. (6 lecture hours and 6 laboratory hours per week.) (6.0 credit course) (Credit will not be granted for 27-106 if taken subsequently to 36-110.) (Restricted to students in the Visual Arts and the Built Environment program.)

36-116/ARCH1160. Computer Graphics
An introduction to computer graphics. This course utilizes Autodesk's AutoCAD and Revit on IBM compatible hardware. The course stresses three dimensional digital modeling as a primary method of communication and design and includes elements of computer visualization techniques. Students acquire hands-on experience through a series of laboratory exercises and individual projects. (Taken at the University of Detroit Mercy.)

36-119/ARCH1190. Introduction to Architecture I
An Introduction to Architecture is offered to first year VABE students to create awareness of the profession of architecture. The course looks at the history of the profession; how architecture is practiced; how the profession is changing; current issues with the architectural profession; and ethical concerns facing a practitioner today. The course gives students a broad based back-ground into architecture before they have an opportunity to be engaged in practice. (Taken at the University of Detroit Mercy.) (Open to VABE students only.)

36-120. Architectural Design II
Students are introduced to media, techniques, vocabulary, and concepts of drawing, as well as principles directly related to the design of buildings and spatial experience. Students will be exposed to complex drawing situations with an emphasis on a variety of materials. During the lab there will be several short term, intense projects that focus on architectural design and will include the study of exterior spaces, space programming, materiality, and constructability. (Prerequisites: 27-107, 36-110.) (6.0 credit course) (Lab fees may apply.)

36-129/ARCH1290. Introduction to Architecture II
This is a continuation of Introduction to Architecture I offered to first year VABE students to create awareness of the profession of architecture. The course looks at the history of the profession; how architecture is practiced; how the profession is changing; current issues with the architectural profession; and ethical concerns facing a practitioner today. The course gives students a broad based back-ground into architecture before they have an opportunity to be engaged in practice. (Taken at the University of Detroit Mercy.) (Open to VABE students only)

36-211/ARCH1211. Visual Communications II
This course is a second year class that is designed to develop the student’s abilities in architectural graphic analysis and presentation techniques. This course builds on the experience gained from Architecture Design I and II, by introducing the student to methods of digital modeling, virtual simulation, representation and fabrication. Students also learn techniques of rendering through modeling virtual three-dimensional environments complete with materials and environmental lighting effects. (Taken at University of Detroit Mercy as ARCH 1211. Open to VABE students only).

36-213. Principles of Structural Behaviour
An analysis of known structural systems in terms of spatial behavior in non-mathematical terms. The basic approaches to structure, proper scale of use and the effects of various materials, geometry and construction techniques are integrated into the course content. Illustrated lectures covering buildings from ancient to modern are used to demonstrate structural principles. (Open to VABE students only.)
    36-215/ARCH2150 Construction I
    This course is the first in a two-semester sequence covering building materials, methods of construction, and assemblies. The goals of Construction I are to explore the form and expression of buildings through their construction systems; to develop a basic understanding of materials and methods of construction; and to investigate the inherent relationship between construing an idea and its construction. Topics covered include site work, concrete, masonry, metals, woods and plastics, doors and windows, vertical transportation systems, glass, overall building assemblies, and systems integration. (Taken at University of Detroit Mercy as ARCH 2150. Open to VABE students only).

    36-216/ARCH2160. 3D Computer Graphics
    This course in computer aided design uses primarily Autodesk 3D Studio software. The emphasis is on visualization and design in three dimensions. Students learn how to assemble complex three-dimensional, digital architectural landscapes equipped with real-life attributes of light, building materials, etc. These objects are rendered and animated to facilitate the needs of the design process as well as complex graphic presentations. Additional post-processing and graphic software is introduced. (Taken at the University of Detroit Mercy.)

    36-221/ARCH 2110 Visual Communications III
    This course is the third in sequence of Visual Communications courses, building on the experience gained from Architecture Design I and II, that is designed to develop the student’s abilities in architectural graphic analysis and presentation techniques. This course will use Computer Aided Design and Building Information Technologytools to analyze, interpret and illustrate building construction at different levels of detail. The class will support lessons from the Construction II course and Architecture Design courses.(Taken at University of Detroit Mercy as ARCH 2110. Open to VABE students only).

    36-225/ARCH2250 Construction II
    This course is the second in a two-semester sequence covering building materials, methods of construction, and assemblies. In Construction II principles, materials, and methods of architectural construction are examined as they relate to the exterior enclosure systems of buildings. An analysis of materials and systems, including: damp proofing, waterproofing, curtain walls, windows, glass and glazing, sealants and joint design, moisture and heat control is undertaken. Codes and standards are considered for their effects on the technical aspects of the construction process. The importance of maintaining the integrity of exterior enclosure systems is stressed.(Taken at University of Detroit Mercy as ARCH 2250. Open to VABE students only).

    36-230/ARCH1300. Architectural Design III
    Design III is intended to transfer ideas explored in first year into their architectural applications while introducing students to the design of simple buildings and spaces as a creative integration of multiple systems i.e. concept, site, function, structure, mechanical systems, accessibility, materials and codes. The overall intent is to give students the opportunity to understand and explore in more detail how various systems inform, integrate and coordinate the design of architectural form and space. This term focuses on the issues of the integration of form and structure and the issue of materiality/constructability. (Prerequisites: 36-120) (Taken at the University of Detroit Mercy.)

    36-233/ARCH2330. Structures I
    Analysis of structures. This course teaches the mathematical calculation of structures through lectures, and individual problem assignments. It focuses on resolution of forces; reaction; forces in frames and trusses; and forces in frames with beams. Also examined are characteristics of structural materials and structural components: shear and bending movements, flexural and shear stresses, combined stresses, principal stresses, combined bending and axial loads and stresses, deflection, continuity in structures. Light weight wood framing is presented as is wood as a structural material. (Prerequisites: 36-213) ) (Taken at the University of Detroit Mercy.)

    36-240/ARCH1400. Architectural Design IV
    Design IV is a continuation of studies begun in Design III. It is intended to further develop the student's ability to design buildings and building complexes within the context of integrated multiple systems. The issues of focus for this term also include sustainability, environmental systems and the design of a totally integrated project. (Prerequisites: 36-230) (Taken at the University of Detroit Mercy.)

    36-243/ARCH2430. Structures II
    This second course in structures focuses on principles of design of simple structures. Primarily studied are the design of beams, columns, trusses, built-up components and foundations in standard structural materials, steel and concrete. Related building construction techniques as well as lateral and seismic loading are also presented. (Prerequisites: 36-233) (Taken at the University of Detroit Mercy.)

    36-300/CEC3000. Co-op Training Presentation
    This course prepares students for the co-op experience. Topics covered include the Career Development Model and the Cooperative Education Model including job search & job readiness, learning objectives, resume writing, and practice interviews. This course offers students the opportunity to learn about the profession of architecture and its practice. (Open to 3rd year VABE students only) (Taken at the University of Detroit Mercy.)

    36-310/ARCH2100. Architectural Design 5
    This is the first of a series of studio courses that combines students from the third and fourth years into a common studio to explore a particular project type and theme. These projects change from term to term. Project types include: housing, civic buildings, urban design, retail, office, health care and manufacturing buildings, etc. Themes include: community design, architectural competitions, historic preservation, electronic design, sustainable design, representation, design-build, and architectural theory. It is the intent of these studios to broaden and deepen the student’s design skills and experiences while preparing them for the Master’s Studios. (Prerequisites: 36-240) (Taken at the University of Detroit Mercy.)

    36-320/ARCH2200. Architectural Design 6
    Design VI is a continuation of studies begun in Design V and is the second part of the combined third and fourth year common senior studio series. The projects change from term to term and students explore different project types and themes. Project types include: housing, civic buildings, urban design, retail, office, health care and manufacturing buildings, etc. Themes include: community design, architectural competitions, historic preservation, electronic design, sustainable design, representation, design-build, and architectural theory. It is the intent of these studios to broaden and deepen the student’s design skills and experiences while preparing them for the Master’s Studios. (Prerequisites: 36-310) (Taken at the University of Detroit Mercy.)



    CINEMA ARTS: COURSES

    39-110. Fundamentals of Film Theory and Aesthetics
    This course introduces students to basic concepts in film theory and aesthetics and is specifically oriented towards production practices. Students will explore the history of film with a focus on the dominant artistic and commercial forms, theoretical analyses, genre classifications and evolving technologies that have influenced and transformed its practices and meanings in relation to the socio-political, artistic and mechanical/media contexts of the medium as they have changed through time.

    39-112. Introduction to Media Design and Production I
    An introduction to fundamental concepts, methods and strategies used to create specific meaning, emotional impact and consumer behaviour through both the analysis and creation of messages. In-class workshops and experiential learning exercises provide students with foundational skills in story development, media treatment, scriptwriting, and production budgets. Students will research various media/delivery channels and potential demographics. (2 lecture, 1 laboratory hour per week) (Also offered as 40-112)

    39-113. Introduction to Media Design and Production II
    Building on skills learned in 40-112, this course offers an introduction to the fundamentals of film and video production. In-class workshops and experiential learning exercises provide students with skills in production planning and audio-visual design including cinematography, lighting, sound recording, editing and digital content deliverables. Combining both studio and field based learning, students will scriptwrite, shoot and edit basic projects. (2 lecture, 1 laboratory hour per week) (Prerequisite: 39-112/40-112). (Also offered as 40-113)

    39-209. Fundamentals of Sound Technology
    This course introduces students to the principles of sound technology and message design appropriate for a variety of contexts. Students will apply relevant design, vocal and sound theory in conceptualizing and producing effective sound messages using contemporary technologies and software. (Prerequisite: 40-112) (2 lecture, 1 laboratory hour per week) (Also offered as 40-209)

    39-215. Experimental Film and Video
    This course examines experimental processes in film, video and sound and provides a technical and critical foundation in each medium. Focus will be given to the basic events and artists central to the historical development of this genre as well as its contemporary practitioners. Based on screenings and various exercises, students will craft projects that explore the potential of these artistic forms in challenging the norms and conventions of mainstream cultural production. (Prerequisite: 39/40-112 or 39/40-113)(Prerequisite as of Fall 2018: 39/40-113) (Also offered as 40-215) (2 lecture, 1 laboratory hour per week)

    39-220 Screenwriting Fundamentals
    This course introduces students to the craft of screenwriting with an emphasis on core concepts such as structure, character development, plot, theme, tone and dialogue. Through a variety of writing exercises and assignments students will develop the skills necessary to translate visual and story ideas into written format. (Prerequisite: 39/40-112) (Also offered as 40-220) (2 lecture and 1 laboratory hour per week).

    39-231. Film Production
    In this project-based course, students pitch project ideas that are then selected based on merit and work in teams to research, write, shoot and edit productions targeted to specific external screening venues. A variety of techniques are explored appropriate for fiction, non-fiction, experimental, etc., genres. (Prerequisite as of Spring 2018: 39-113/40-113; Prerequisites for Fall 2017 and Winter 2018: 39-112/40-112.)(2 lecture, 1 laboratory hour per week) (Also offered as 40-231)

    39-232. Documentary
    In this project-based course, students will work in groups to write proposals, scripts and storyboards while also familiarizing themselves with the terminology, aesthetics, mechanics and equipment associated with producing, lighting, shooting and editing for studio and location-based documentary projects. (Prerequisite as of Spring 2018: 39-113/40-113; Prerequisites for Fall 2017 and Winter 2018: 39-112/40-112.)(2 lecture, 1 laboratory hour per week)(Also offered as 40-232) (Credit may not be obtained for both 40-218 and 39/40-232.)

    39-310. Cinematography
    This course focuses on cinematic visuals using various cameras as tools. Students will explore the theory and craft of motion picture cinematography. This course will provide students with the opportunity to shoot several film assignments, engage in critical discussion, conduct peer reviews of each other’s work, and screen their productions. (Prerequisite: 40-210 or 39/40-231) (Prerequisite as of Fall 2019: 39/40-231)(Also offered as 40-310).

    39-314. Studio and Location Lighting for Film and Video
    This course examines the aesthetics, techniques and technology of lighting and its role in storytelling and meaning-making processes. Through hands-on exercises with lighting instruments and systems, students will develop skills in professional and creative applications of lighting in both location and studio environments. (Prerequisites: 40-218 or 39/40-232, 40-219 or 39/40-231) (Prerequisite as of Fall 2019: 39/40-232 or 39/40-231) (Also offered as 40-314) (2 lecture and 1 laboratory hour per week)

    39-317. Directing the Screen Performance
    This course provides practical knowledge about techniques and methods in directing actors for the screen. Through in-class exercises, workshops and scene studies, students will learn about the art of acting from both performance and directorial perspectives and develop an appreciation of the collaborative relationship between actors and directors. Directing processes will be rigorously analyzed in order to develop a critical approach to direction and the relationship of performance to technical visual/screen languages. Student-directors will become familiar with casting, rehearsal and shooting protocols and gain insight into the demands the camera makes on actors. (Prerequisite: 40-219 or 39/40-231) (Prerequisite as of Fall 2019: 39/40-231) (Also offered as 40-317)

    39-320. Intermediate Screenwriting
    This course builds on skills acquired in 39-220. Students will write scripts that will be work shopped throughout the semester in order to develop and refine writing and storytelling skills. Writing assignments, discussion, peer review, pitch presentations and analysis of texts via screenings and readings will inform the students’ work and understanding of the form. (Prerequisites: 40-219 or 39/40-220) (Prerequisite as of Fall 2019: 39/40-220) (Also offered as 40-320).

    39-323. Production Planning and Development
    This course provides a foundation in pre-production and planning processes including the development of location agreements, production schedules and budgets. Students will also learn how to assemble representative portfolios of their creative work, advance their pitching skills, write effective grant proposals and identify funding sources for independent film/video projects in the Canadian context. (Prerequisite: 40-218 or 40-219 or 39/40-232 or 39/40-231) (Prerequisite as of Fall 2019: 39/40-232 or 39/40-231) (Also offered as 40-323)

    39-327. Digital Video Editing and Post-Production
    This course provides an examination of the historical, aesthetic and theoretical aspects of editing and post-production. Through screenings, workshops, praxis-based pedagogical approaches and group assignments, students will explore various editing styles and acquire advanced editing skills in accordance with industry standard software. (Prerequisite: 40-219 or 39/40-231) (Prerequisite as of Fall 2019: 39/40-231) (2 lecture, 1 laboratory per week) (Also offered as 40-327)

    39-330. Motion Picture Technologies
    An in-depth study of techniques for creating 3D film production, special effects, aerial cinematography and robotic cinema imagery. Students will expand their creative visual approach and technical practice in field and film studios. (Prerequisite: 40-219 or 39/40-231.) (Prerequisite as of Fall 2019: 39/40-231.) (2 Lecture hours, 1 lab hour a week). (Also offered as 40-330).

    39-331. Intermediate Film Production
    This course continues the creative approach to and technical practice of independent film production initiated in 39/40-231. Students will expand their experience and knowledge of theoretical and practical filmmaking in both field and studio settings. (Prerequisite: 40-219 or 39/40-231) (Prerequisite as of Fall 2019: 39/40-231) (2 lecture and 1 laboratory hour per week) (Also offered as 40-331)

    39-332. Intermediate Documentary
    This course examines theories, techniques and styles of modern documentary as well as other non-fiction forms such as the photo-essay. Students may investigate different sub-genres of the documentary approach and create projects that explore specific personal, social and/or community/campus related issues. Readings and in-class screenings will focus on the theory and practice of documentary for social change. (Prerequisites: 40-218 or 39/40-232) (Prerequisite as of Fall 2019: 39/40-232) (2 lecture and 1 laboratory hour a week) (Also offered as 40-332)

    39-415 Advanced Studio and Location Lighting for Film and Video
    This course builds on skills acquired in 40-314 and will deepen student's technical, conceptual and aesthetic knowledge while working with light in creative projects. Students will explore a variety of strategies to evoke specific moods/themes and plan and execute aesthetically strong and technically advanced lighting schemes for controlled studio environments and diverse interior and exterior location sites. (Prerequisite: 39/40-314) (Also offered as 40-415) (2 lecture, 1 laboratory hour per week)

    39-420. Advanced Screenwriting
    A continuation of the study and practice of screenwriting for short film and video projects, students in this course focus on narrative craft and theory while workshopping scripts toward a final pitch presentation. The goal of this course is to expand the students’ writing and storytelling skills through writing assignments, discussion, peer review, pitch presentations, creative exercises and in-depth analysis of texts via screenings and readings. (Pre-requisite: 39/40-320)(Also offered as 40-420)

    39-427. Advanced Editing and Post-Production
    This course explores various technical, aesthetic and ethical issues involved in editing, color grading, 16mm and 35mm HD Telecine, special effects, post production workflow. Through readings, screenings, hands-on exercises and projects, students will gain in-depth knowledge about the impact of post-production aural/visual effects and manipulation in editing processes. (Prerequisites: 39/40-331.) (2 lecture, 1 laboratory hour per week) (Also offered as 40-427)

    39-432. Advanced Documentary
    A continuation of 39/40-332, this course will further explore issues and concepts that apply to documentary film. Students will analyze the form and create work within a context of artistic experimentation and theoretical consideration. Students will further develop their abilities to reflect upon, critique, discuss and express the creative strategies and theoretical meanings that motivate their own work on topics of local interest that engage and impact local communities, particularly on campus. (Prerequisite: 39/40-332). (Also offered as 40-432).