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Winter 2015 Undergraduate Calendar


ACADEMIC REGULATIONS

Students are responsible for becoming familiar and complying with the general regulations of the University as contained in this section. Additionally, students must be familiar and comply with the regulations of the Faculty in which they are enrolled. These particular requirements may be found in the program sections of this calendar.

Students also are directed to read the Statement of Responsibility, and the calendar of important dates and deadlines under Academic Dates.

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS (definitions for full-time/part-time student, audit student, academic probation, etc.)
ACADEMIC ADVISING
RESIDENCY REQUIREMENTS (the number of courses that must be completed at the University of Windsor)
ADVANCED STANDING (advanced standing reduces the total number of courses a student must complete for a degree)
LETTERS OF PERMISSION (permission to take courses at another university for credit towards their UWindsor degree)
ADDITIONAL UNDERGRADUATE DEGREES
CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS (definition and policy)
DEFINITION OF COURSES AND SESSIONS
COURSE CONTENT
PROGRAM/COURSE NUMBERING SYSTEM (defines Faculty codes and program/course codes)
COURSE EQUIVALENCY POLICY (permission to substitute one course for another)
REPEATING A COURSE
MAXIMUM COURSE LOAD AND OVERLOAD (course taken in addition to the prescribed semester or term load)
OPTIONS (courses in subjects other than the major subject)
MINOR (provides a general knowledge of an area of study)
TRANSFERRING TO ANOTHER PROGRAM
COMBINED MAJOR (majoring in two subject areas)
SENIOR-LEVEL COURSE REQUIREMENTS (minimum number of courses to be completed at the 200-level or above)
STANDING REQUIRED FOR CONTINUATION IN PROGRAMS
(minimum major and cumulative averages required to continue in a program of study)
STANDING REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION (the minimum major and cumulative averages required of a student to graduate)
GRADUATING "WITH DISTINCTION"/"WITH GREAT DISTINCTION"
INTRODUCTORY STATISTICS COURSES
POLICY ON UNACCEPTABLE USE OF COMPUTER RESOURCES
POLICY ON PLAGIARISM


CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS
A full-time student is one who is registered in four or more undergraduate courses in a term.

A part-time student is one who is registered in fewer than four undergraduate courses in a term.

A regular student is one who has met the average requirements for admission or the minimum average requirements for continuation in his or her program of studies.

A conditioned student is one who, at the time of admission, does not have standing in a required subject or subjects.

A visiting student is one who registers and takes courses for credit for the purpose of transferring the credit to the university at which he or she was previously registered. Normally, visiting students are advised to have written permission from the home university in order to register for courses.

A special or non-degree student is one who is taking courses for credit but not proceeding to a degree at this University.

An audit student is one who attends (a) course(s) but does not receive any grade(s) or credit for the course(s) towards a degree. Such a student will not be allowed to write examinations and may not be graded in any way, but will be required to pay the regular fees for the course(s).

A student on academic probation is one who has not met the full admission requirements to a program or a student who, once admitted, has shown unsatisfactory progress at the conclusion of the previous term. (See the regulations pertaining to each Faculty.)

Academic probation is removed if a student demonstrates satisfactory progress by the end of the probationary period. Normally, a student will be required to withdraw from a faculty if performance is not satisfactory at the conclusion of the academic probationary period.

For regulations pertaining to the possible readmission of students who have been required to withdraw, see the regulations pertaining to each Faculty.

ACADEMIC ADVISING

The responsibility for becoming familiar and complying with the requirements for degrees and with academic regulations rests primarily with the student. Every student can access a "Degree Audit Report" on the Student Self Service page at https://my.uwindsor.ca which reports a student's progress towards fulfilling degree requirements.

In addition, academic advising is strongly recommended for all students. Academic units provide individual assistance to students both in the selection of their programs of studies and in the choice of courses in keeping with program requirements. General questions normally should be addressed to the Associate Dean of the Faculty.

Students are strongly urged to seek course and program advising to ensure that they understand degree requirements. It is recognized that many students may not have decided on their major areas or on their final career goals prior to entering University. Consequently, it is not unusual for students to change their programs of study after taking several courses. Every effort is made to assist such students, within the limits of the requirements of the various programs.

Students who are considering program changes may request assistance from advisors within their proposed area of study. Application forms for a change of program are available on the web on the Student Self Service page at https://my.uwindsor.ca.

Students are required to have declared a major by the time they have successfully completed ten semester courses.

RESIDENCY REQUIREMENTS

The number of courses required for the attainment of any degree or certificate is indicated in each program. These requirements may be reduced through the transfer of credit from another university. However, a student will be required to complete successfully, at the University of Windsor, a minimum of ten courses (thirty semester hours) numbered 200 or higher to qualify for a degree from the University of Windsor, except in the Faculty of Business four-year Honours Business programs (see below). Residency requirements can be met by University of Windsor courses taken either on-campus, at off-campus sites or through Distance Education. These ten courses must include a minimum of six courses from the major course requirements to qualify for a three-year major degree or a minimum of ten courses from the major course requirements to qualify for a four-year Honours or Major or professional degree except in the Faculty of Engineering where a student must complete at least 50% of the total number of weighted units required for the Bachelor of Applied Science at the University of Windsor. Double majors are required to take a minimum of five courses at the 200 level or above from the major course requirements in each of the Majors at the University of Windsor.

In the Faculty of Business Administration a student will be required to complete successfully, at the University of Windsor, a minimum of:
• ten Business courses (thirty semester hours) numbered 300 or higher to qualify for a Bachelor of Commerce (Honours Business Administration) degree.
• eight Business courses (twenty-four semester hours) plus two Computer Science courses (six semester hours) numbered 300 or higher to qualify for a Bachelor of Commerce (Honours Business Administration and Computer Science) degree.
• eight Business courses (twenty-four semester hours) plus two Economics courses (six semester hours) numbered 300 or higher to qualify for a Bachelor of Commerce (Honours Business Administration and Economics) degree.
• eight Business courses (twenty-four semester hours) numbered 300 or higher, plus two language courses (six semester hours) numbered 200 or higher to qualify for a Bachelor of Commerce (Honours International Business) degree.
• ten courses (thirty semester hours) numbered 200 or higher to qualify for the Honours Bachelor of Commerce (for University Graduates) degree.
• As above, residency requirements can be met by University of Windsor courses taken either on-campus, at off-campus sites or through Distance Education. These ten courses must include a minimum of six courses from the major course requirements to qualify for a three-year major degree or a minimum of ten courses from the major course requirements to qualify for a four-year Honours or Major or professional degree.

A student will be required to complete successfully at the University of Windsor a minimum of five courses (fifteen semester hours) to qualify for a certificate offered in the Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences, with the exception of the certificate in North American Studies which requires the completion of four courses at the 200-level or above. To qualify for a certificate offered in the Odette School of Business, a student will be required to complete at the University of Windsor six courses (eighteen semester hours)

To qualify for a Minor, a minimum of three courses counting toward the Minor must be successfully completed at the University of Windsor.

ADVANCED STANDING

The granting of advanced standing reduces the total number of courses a student must complete for a degree.

By Transfer: A student who has successfully completed a course with a minimum grade of 60% at a recognized institution of higher learning may be granted credit for that course. The grade will not be shown on the University of Windsor transcript. The transfer of credits from another institution will be evaluated by the Office of the Registrar in consultation with the appropriate academic unit. Students should begin this process as early as possible in order to ensure appropriate placement in their program. An official transcript (and translation, if necessary) and a copy of course descriptions should be submitted to the Office of the Registrar at the time of application. Students who feel that the evaluation of prior academic work is not appropriate must appeal their evaluation to the Office of the Registrar within one term after admission to their program of study. (see Transfer Policy for further details)

Transfer Credit for Visual Arts Courses: Students who have taken art courses at other post-secondary institutions and desire credit for basic courses in Visual Arts must submit a portfolio of their own work for evaluation by Visual Arts, together with an official transcript of their record and catalogues describing the courses taken, all of which must be submitted no later than two weeks before the first day of classes. Transfer students who wish to receive art history credit for courses taken at other institutions may be required to take a qualifying examination during the first week of regularly scheduled classes. The examination will cover those Art History courses from which the student wishes to be exempted.

By Examination: A student may acquire knowledge of the subject matter of a course in a manner which does not provide a basis for credit by transfer. Such a student may request to write an examination for advanced standing within one term after admission to a specific program. If such request is approved and the examination is administered, a minimum grade of 60% is required for the granting of advanced standing. Success in such examinations will be recorded as "Advanced Standing by Examination" with the credit value of the course and a grade of "Pass". A student who is unsuccessful in attaining advanced standing after an initial examination will not be permitted a second attempt. Contact the Office of the Registrar for application forms and additional information.

By Prior Learning Assessment: A student may acquire knowledge of the subject matter of a course in a manner which does not provide a basis for credit by transfer. Such a student should contact the Office of the Registrar for application forms and additional information within one term after admission to their program of study.

LETTERS OF PERMISSION

A student who wishes to take one or more courses of his or her minor, certificate or degree program at another university must request a "Letter of Permission" in advance of registration to ensure that the course(s), if completed successfully, will be credited towards his or her minor, certificate or degree program.

Application for a "Letter of Permission" will be made at the Office of the Registrar, which shall forward the application to the appropriate AAU Head or Associate Dean for approval. Approval shall be based on the applicant's overall academic record, the appropriateness of the particular course to the applicant's minor, certificate or degree program and on any other factors deemed relevant. Students on academic probation will not usually qualify for a "Letter of Permission". The appropriate fee will apply.

Following approval of the application, the Registrar shall issue a "Letter of Permission" to the applicant and the university concerned.

Upon completion of the course(s) the student must request the visited institution to submit an official transcript for any course(s) attempted to the Office of the Registrar. The course(s) successfully completed with a grade of 60% or better will normally be credited towards the minor, certificate or degree program, but the grade(s) received will neither be recorded nor used in the calculation of University of Windsor averages.
    Students who do not secure a Letter of Permission in advance of completing the course at another university are at risk of coursework not being applied to their University of Windsor minor, certificate or degree program, the determination of which shall be made by the AAU Head or Associate Dean.

    ADDITIONAL UNDERGRADUATE DEGREES

    An individual who wishes to pursue a second undergraduate degree must take the following steps:

    1. (a) If one degree has already been conferred, a student must make application for admission and be admitted to the second degree program. This application is made for approval to pursue the second degree and will inform the student of the total number of courses required for it. This may be done by completing an Application for Returning Students form on SIS or by completing the form in the Office of the Registrar (Students wishing to rescind their first degree to lessen the number of courses required for the second degree, may do so at this time); OR

    (b) If both degrees are being pursued at the same time, a student must complete a "Declaration of Second Degree" form in the Office of the Registrar to determine eligibility for the intended second degree and to be informed of the total number of courses required for it. This form should be completed as soon as the student has the intent to pursue more than one degree; AND

    2. Fulfill all the specific requirements of each degree program including residency requirements as described see "Residency Requirements" as well as any program specific requirements (where appropriate); AND

    3. Take the appropriate number of courses over and above the first degree by meeting the following additional degree requirements:

    (a) Students with one general degree (B.A., B.Sc., B.C.S., B.Math., B.M.A.):
    • may count a maximum of twenty courses toward a second general degree in a different area of study*.
    • may count a maximum of twenty courses toward a professional degree.**
    • may count a maximum of thirty courses toward an Honours degree in the same or different major.***

    (b) Students with one Honours degree in a single major (B.A., B.A.S., B.Sc., B.C.S., B.Math., B.F.A., B.O.R., B.F.S., B.E.S.)
    • may count a maximum of twenty courses toward a general degree in a different area of study*.
    • may count a maximum of twenty courses toward a professional degree.**
    • may count a maximum of thirty courses toward a second Honours degree in a different area of study*
    • may not receive another Honours degree combining the area of study in their first Honours degree with another.

    (c) Students with a previous degree in Music will be permitted to pursue a second degree in Music Therapy on the condition that they complete a minimum of 15 additional courses at least 10 of which must be taken at the University of Windsor at the 200-level or above.

    (d) Students with one Honours degree with a double major (B.A., B.Sc., B.Math)
    • may not receive a general degree with a major in either area of study from their first Honours degree.
    • may count a maximum of thirty courses toward a second Honours degree in one of the same majors as the first degree provided that a minimum of eight courses in that major field are taken over and above the major courses used in the first degree.

    (e) Students with one Professional degree (B.A.Sc., B. Comm., B.H.K., B.S.W., B.Sc.N., LL.B.)
    • may count a maximum of twenty courses toward a general degree.**
    • may count a maximum of twenty courses toward a second professional degree in a different area of study.*
    • may count a maximum of thirty courses toward an Honours degree.

    (f) Students with one Four Year Major degree (B.A., B.Sc.):
    • may not receive an Honours degree in the same area of study. Students who improve their major average to qualify for the Honours designation may apply for the Honours degree provided they rescind their Major degree.

    (g) Students who have completed a degree in Education through the consecutive pre-service program, or who have completed Education courses in a Concurrent program, may not count any of the Education courses toward another degree.

    (h) Students applying for admission to Bachelor of Commerce (Honours Business Administration) program after completing the BBS degree will be evaluated under the admission requirements of the B.Comm at the time of the student's application, and it is possible that some BBS courses may not be given credit towards the B.Comm degree. Students may retain only one of these degrees.

    (i) Students who have already been granted a second undergraduate degree as listed above, may only count a maximum of ten courses toward a third degree. These courses may not include the ones already counted for the second degree.

    (j) Students may not use any courses used toward a minor in a first degree toward the major of a second degree unless the minor is rescinded from the first degree. Please see "Minor" for additional regulations concerning minors.

    (k) Students with a graduate degree in one area of study may not receive a general or honours degree (single or combined) in the same area of study as the graduate degree.


    * The major of the second degree must be distinct from the major in the first degree. Therefore, in all cases, a student with an Honours degree cannot receive a general degree in the same major (e.g, If a student has already received an Honours degree in English, that student cannot request admission nor receive a general degree in English. Likewise, a student with a BA Honours degree in Economics may not receive a BSc Honours degree in Economics; or a student with a BCS General or Honours in Computer Science may not receive a BSc Honours or General degree in Computer Science). However there are instances where the majors are not the same but the requirements for the major include courses from the same subject area. To determine if two degrees can be awarded in these cases, the general rule is: if the first degree requires six or more courses in a subject area, then a general degree in a major that requires courses from that same subject area will not be allowed OR if the first degree requires eleven or more courses in a subject area, then an Honours degree in a major that requires courses from that same subject area will not be allowed.

    ** Exceptions to this regulation are as follows: a student with any degree majoring in Economics may not receive an Honours B.Comm. in Business Administration and Economics and a student with any degree in Computer Science (including the B.Sc. degrees offered in Computer Science) may not receive an Honours B.Comm in Business Administration and Computer Science. These students may only be considered for the Bachelor of Commerce for University Graduates program which results in a B.Comm. Degree in Business Administration. Likewise, a student with an Honours degree in Business Administration and Economics or Business Administration and Computer Science may not receive a general degree in Economics or Computer Science respectively.

    ***If an Honours degree is awarded in the same area of study as the General degree, the Honours degree will supersede the General degree for the purposes of this policy and the completion of the General and Honours degrees in the same area of study will be viewed as one degree.

    Students who receive the BEngTech degree may apply to the BASc program. All BEngTech engineering courses successfully completed with a grade of 60% or better may be counted towards the BASc program, provided the course(s) fit(s) within the program requirements of the BASc program in which the student has been admitted. Once the B.A.Sc. requirements are met, both degrees will appear on their records (transcript). Students who received a four year degree in a technical subject in Science, if admitted into the BEngTech program, may be asked to take additional courses in Engineering beyond the minimum requirements and up to four of the courses in their original degree can be counting towards the BEngTech program, if appropriate. Students with a BASc degree may not receive a BEngTech degree.

    CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS

    A Certificate is a non-degree program that encourages non-traditional entry to the University (including outside of discipline-based degree programs), recognizes special sets of skills and knowledge not necessarily based in a single discipline, or recognizes a focus or concentration of learning distinct from a full degree.

    Students may be granted advanced standing for all of the courses from a certificate program towards the fulfillment of graduation requirements for a degree, and all of the courses from a degree program may be counted towards the requirements of a Certificate program in a different area of study, with the exception of Nursing, Electrical Engineering, and Accounting.

    DEFINITION OF COURSES AND SESSIONS

    The word "course" generally refers to a 3.00 credit hour offering which is given over one term. Each term includes approximately twelve weeks of classes. During each regular academic year (September to April), the Fall term runs from early September to early December and the Winter term runs from early January to mid-April. Each term concludes with final examinations. Additionally, the University schedules courses in a Summer term which includes Intersession (May - June) and Summer Session (July - August), each of which are approximately six weeks in duration. Courses given in these sessions carry the same credit as those in the Fall and Winter terms. Some courses offered in the Summer Term run from May - August (12 weeks).

    In some areas, courses also may be offered for 1.50 credit hours, or for 6.00 credit hours. Courses of any credit hour value may be offered over multiple terms or over a part of a term.

    In a few cases a course may be "linked" with another course in the sense that credit is granted only when both courses have been completed successfully. Course descriptions indicate "linked" courses. Unless otherwise indicated, such courses must be taken in successive terms.

    The time required to complete programs can vary according to the student's choice. If courses are taken exclusively in the Fall and Winter terms, a general degree normally is completed in three years and a four-year Honours, Major or professional degree in four years of full-time study. Students may choose to accelerate their programs by attending Summer term, Intersession and/or Summer Session, or may spread their programs over a longer period by attending as part-time students. Some programs place a time limit on degree completion. Refer to individual Faculty and program regulations for such limits.

    COURSE CONTENT

    Information regarding the content and the hours of instruction per week for all courses is to be found in the individual subject area listings. The time schedule for classes can be obtained online at www.uwindsor.ca/registrar/timetable.

    The University does not attempt to impose uniformity in methods of course presentation. Therefore, methods of course presentation vary and may involve lectures, lectures combined with class discussion, small group or tutorial instruction, seminars, or other combinations of the above. In all cases, the method(s) to be used will be explained early in the course.

    COURSE NUMBERING SYSTEM AND FACULTY AND PROGRAM CODES

    Each course is identified by a three-part number. The first part refers to the Faculty, the second part to the subject area, the third to the level of the course. Thus, the course 02-46-220 would be a course in the Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences (02-), in the subject area of Psychology (46-) and would be at a level that places it among courses in the 200 series. The series 100, 200, 300, and 400 numbers are intended to indicate progressively more demanding content and correspondingly increasing background and competence on the part of the students enrolled in the course.

    Numbers in the range 100-199 are ordinarily used for the introductory courses in most disciplines. Within the range, however, a lower number does not necessarily signify more elementary content. It is important that students planning their courses have clearly in mind the significance of these numbers so that they may guard against undertaking course work at levels for which they are insufficiently prepared. A number of courses have stated prerequisites which are prior requirements for entry to a course. Students who do not satisfy the prerequisite for a course, or who in the opinion of the instructor do not possess an equivalent background to that of the stated prerequisite, may not register for the course, and may be removed if they register inappropriately.


    Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences
    Faculty of Science
    Faculty of Business Administration
    Faculty of Education and Academic Development
    Faculty of Engineering
    Faculty of Human Kinetics
    Faculty of Law
    Faculty of Nursing
    Inter-Faculty Programs

    01- (Arts)/02- (Social Sciences)
    03-
    04-
    05-
    06-
    07-
    08-
    11-
    14-

    Program/Course Codes
    Note: The Program/Course codes are preceded by the relevant Faculty code.

    Arts and Science, 14-56-
    Additional Qualification Courses, 05-79-
    Biology, 03-55-
    Business Administration:
    Accounting, 04-70-
    Business Strategy and Entrepreneurship, 04-75-
    Finance, 04-72-
    Management and Labour Studies, 04-71-
    Management Science, 04-73-
    Marketing, 04-74-
    Chemistry and Biochemistry, 03-59-
    Civil and Environmental Engineering:
    Civil, 06-87-
    Environmental, 06-93-
    Languages, Literatures and Cultures:
    Aboriginal Studies, 01-06-
    Inter cultural Studies, 01-07-
    Asian Studies, 01-10-
    Greek and Roman Studies, 01-11-
    Greek & Roman History, 01-12
    Greek Language & Literature, 01-13-
    Latin Language & Literature, 01-14-
    German, 01-15-
    Italian, 01-21-
    Spanish, 01-23-
    Communication, Media, and Film: 02-40-
    Computer Science, 03-60-
    Diaspora Studies, 02-45-
    Digital Journalism, 02-30-
    Disability Studies, 02-37-
    Dramatic Art: 01-24-
    Earth Sciences:
    Environmental Science, 03-66-
    Economics, 03-41-
    Education, 05-80-
    Electrical and Computer Engineering, 06-88-
    English, 01-26-
    Environmental Studies, 14-58-
    Forensics, 14-57-
    French Studies, 01-29-
    General Engineering, 06-85-
    Geography: 02-42-
    History, 02-43-
    Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering, 06-91-
    Inter-Faculty, 14-51-
    Kinesiology, 07-95-
    Labour Studies: 02-54-
    Law service courses, 08-99-
    Law courses, 08-98-
    Mathematics and Statistics:
    Mathematics, 03-62-
    Statistics, 03-65-
    Mechanical, Automotive, and Materials Engineering:
    Mechanical, 06-92-
    Automotive, 06-94-
    Materials, 06-89-
    Music:
    Music Academic Studies, 01-32-
    Music Performance Studies, 01-33-
    Nursing, 11-63-
    Philosophy: 01-34-
    Physics, 03-64-
    Political Science: 02-45-
    Psychology: 02-46-
    Social Justice: 02-38-
    Social Work: 02-47-
    Sociology, Anthropology, and Criminology:
    Sociology, Criminology, 02-48-
    Anthropology, 02-49-
    Planning, 02-50
    Visual Arts:
    Visual Arts, 01-27-
    Art History, 01-28-
    Film/Production Courses, 01-39-
    Women's Studies, 02-53-


    COURSE EQUIVALENCY POLICY
    (Approved by Senate: May 11, 2010)

    With the permission of the program chair or department head or director in the major area, and subject to the approval of the dean or associate dean, a student may substitute one course for another of equivalent learning outcomes and content. This equivalent course satisfies the original requirement. The University of Windsor acknowledges its responsibility to balance flexibility in accommodating students’ degree pathways with the need to ensure that students graduating from the University have acquired the essential graduate attributes of their programs. Equivalency between the course required by a given program and a proposed substitute course must be evaluated in a thorough and comprehensive manner by the program chair, department head/director and the Dean’s office. The criteria that must be met by the proposed substitute course include the following:

    Criteria for Course Equivalency
    1. Breadth/depth. Survey and introductory courses generally provide breadth while more advanced courses tend to provide depth. In considering course equivalencies, this dimension should be taken into account.
      o For example, an introductory course in one field might be considered equivalent to an introductory course in another.
    2. Comparable learning outcomes. The course in question must involve similar learning outcomes in terms of breadth/depth, and in terms of the balance and nature of the skills, attitudes, and content outcomes specified for the course.
      o For example, a course from one area of business administration may be considered the equivalent of another course in another branch of business administration because it requires a comparable balance of skills, attitude and content.
    3. Level of course. A course must be offered at an equivalent level to be eligible for substitution. Level is evaluated by considering the degree of sophistication of the course requirements
      o For example, a 200-level course may at times be substituted for a 300-level course. A lower level course cannot normally be substituted for a 400-level course.
    4. Similarity of origin or source. Equivalency of courses from cognate disciplines is generally more readily established than equivalency of courses from unrelated disciplines. In some cases, equivalency between courses identified as anti-requisites might also be acceptable (e.g., statistics courses).
      o For example, an entry-level history course might substitute for an entry-level political science course, but an entry-level literature course might not substitute for an entry-level chemistry course.
    5. Course delivery format. Alternate formats of course delivery are acceptable when they provide an equivalent learning experience.
      o For example, a theatre history course delivered in an online format might be considered equivalent to the face-to-face lecture-based course, but a nursing course requiring experiential learning might not be equivalent to an online nursing course with no practical component.

    Regulations Governing Course Substitution Approvals
    1. The allowable number of course substitutions by a student in one degree should be determined at the Faculty level as long as this determination is not in contravention of university-wide academic requirements.
    2. Approval of a course substitution is not a general statement of equivalency between two courses; it is a singular identification of equivalency based on the student’s unique case.
    3. The process of establishing equivalency usually requires consultation with the department housing the proposed substitute.
    4. A recurring course equivalent substitution approved in a given program should be formalized through a general policy that would allow for standardizing substitutions in like cases.
    5. Course equivalency approvals must be tracked at the departmental level in order to identify and ensure efficient programmatic response to calendaring and scheduling problems, rather than temporary, piecemeal solutions. These data should be submitted to the dean for annual review.
    6. Course equivalencies are approved by the dean or associate dean following the recommendation of the program director or department chair.

    REPETITION OF COURSES
    1a. Students in first entry undergraduate programs may take any failed course for a second time, subject to exceptions below.

    1b. Students in undergraduate programs may repeat any passed course twice. In the Faculty of Nursing, students who wish to repeat a previously passed required nursing course for any purpose may only be considered to do so if they can be accommodated in the course by the professor. However; students are not encouraged to repeat previously passed nursing courses.

    2. Students who have twice failed a course which is required for graduation in their program will be withdrawn from the program, unless a request to take the course a third time has been granted by the Dean of the Faculty (or designate) in which the student is registered, in accordance with 2.1 below. If the Dean (or designate) has approved the student’s request to take the course for a third time, the student will be reinstated in the program.
      2.1 In exceptional circumstances, permission to take twice failed courses for a third time may be granted by the Dean (or designate) of the Faculty in which the student is registered, after consultation with the Dean (or designate) of the Faculty in which the course is offered (if different), following a detailed review of the student’s academic record and documented extenuating circumstances that may have affected the student’s success in the course. The decision of the Dean (or designate) of the Faculty in which the student is registered shall be final and shall be filed together with the rationale with the Office of the Registrar.

      In the Faculty of Nursing, students who failed a required nursing course may not repeat the course more than once. No more than two required nursing courses may be repeated in the case of failures.

      In the Faculty of Engineering passed courses may be repeated only in the final year of study as may be allowed by the Faculty.

      2.2. Students who have been required to withdraw from a program based on this policy will be able to transfer into any other program (general or honours) at the University provided they meet the admission and program requirements for that program.

      Following normal procedures for Degree Audit Report (DARS) exceptions, in exceptional circumstances, the Dean (or designate) of the Faculty in which the student is registered, after consultation with the Dean (or designate) of the Faculty in which the course is offered (if different), may allow the student to substitute an equivalent course in place of the passed or failed course the student wishes to repeat. Exceptional circumstances may include: where a course is no longer offered; where a course is not available to the student within the following three semesters; where a course is not available to the student within a given semester and the student’s progression through the program would be unduly negatively impacted by delaying the course repeat attempt; or where a course is not available within a time period that includes the graduating semester.
      Note: Please refer also to CALCULATION OF AVERAGES for details on how a repeated course is calculated.


      MAXIMUM COURSE LOAD AND OVERLOAD

      Overload courses are deemed to be courses taken in addition to the prescribed term load for a given program. These could include a) courses repeated or taken in lieu of failed courses, b) courses taken to accelerate the time to completion of degree requirements or c) courses taken in addition to those required for the program in which the student is registered.

      Students in Semester 1 may not register in any course overload. Students in Semester 2 may not register in any course overload with the following exception: Year 1 students, in the Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences, the Faculty of Science, and the Centre for Inter-Faculty Programs, who have qualifying averages of 90% or higher and are in good academic standing at the end of Semester 1 may apply for permission to take a course overload in Semester 2 of Year 1. In the case of the Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences and the Faculty of Science, students shall submit such applications to the Associate Dean of their Faculty. In the case of the Centre for Inter-Faculty Programs, students shall submit such applications to the Director of the Centre for Inter-Faculty Programs.
        Senior students (Years 2 - 4) who are not on academic probation may normally register in only one overload course during each of the Fall and Winter terms. In the Faculty of Science course overload requests must be approved by the Associate Dean of the Faculty of Science. In the Faculty of Engineering course overload requests must be approved by the Associate Dean of the Faculty of Engineering. In the Faculty of Nursing, overload is not permitted while taking Year 4 level courses.

        Students should not take overload courses unless absolutely necessary since the result may be poorer overall performance.

        All three-year programs require the completion of thirty courses and most Honours or four-year Major programs require the completion of forty courses. For such programs, therefore, the normal course load during the Fall and Winter terms is five courses.

        Certain Honours or four-year Major programs require more than forty courses for completion of the degree. For these programs the prescribed term load is indicated in the program section of the calendar.

        A student may take up to three six-week courses in either Intersession or Summer Session, but no more than a total of five courses over the combined Intersession and Summer Session time period. Students in the Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences who are on academic probation may take no more than two courses during each of Intersession and Summer session and altogether no more than four courses over the combined Intersession and Summer session time period.

        The normal course load for Co-op programs which include a summer study term is included in the program section of the calendar (see Overload Course Feein the Registration/Fee Regulations section of this calendar).

        OPTIONS

        Options are courses in subjects other than the major subject(s). For the purpose of meeting option requirements the University categorizes its courses as follows:

        ARTS(In addition, all Language courses can satisfy Arts options)
        Art History
        Greek and Roman Studies
        Dramatic Art
        English and Creative Writing
        General Courses, Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences (01/02)
        Intercultural Studies
        Music-Academic Studies
        Music-Performance Studies
        Philosophy
        Visual Arts
        Women's Studies*
        *The following Women’s Studies courses may be taken for Arts credit: 53-106, 53-120, 53-130, 53-230, 53-240, 53-250, 53-236, 53-270, 53-300, 53-335, 53-345, and 53-380.
        The following Inter-Faculty course may be taken for Arts credit: 51-160.

        LANGUAGES
        Arabic
        French
        German
        Ancient Greek
        Italian
        Japanese
        Latin
        Spanish
        Hebrew

        Note:Courses in all languages listed above that may be used to satisfy language option requirements include: xx-100, xx-101, xx-102, xx-200, xx-201, xx-202. xx-300, xx-301. All French Studies courses count as language option requirements. 08-110 and 08-111 (formerly 07-110 and 07-111) also count as language option requirements. All other courses in any language listed above count only as Arts options.


        SOCIAL SCIENCES
        Anthropology
        Communication Studies
        Economics***
        General Courses, Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences (02)
        Human Geography (42-)
        History
        Labour Studies
        Planning
        Political Science
        Psychology
        Social Work
        Sociology
        Women's Studies**
        ** (53-106, 53-120, 53-130, 53-230, 53-240, 53-250, 53-270, 53-300, 53-345, and 53-380 can satisfy either a Social Science or an Arts option requirement.)
        ***All Economics courses will be permitted to satisfy either science or social science options.
        The following Inter-Faculty and Environmental Studies courses may be taken for Social Science credit: 51-160, 58-110 and 58-210.

        SCIENCE
        Biology
        Biochemistry
        Chemistry
        Computer Science
        Economics***
        Environmental Science
        General Courses, Faculty of Science (03)
        Geology
        Mathematics
        Physical Geography (67-)
        Physics
        Statistics
        Women's Studies**

        ** Women's Studies 53-220 will satisfy either a Social Science or a Science option requirement.
        ***All Economics courses will be permitted to satisfy either science or social science options.

        Note: For students in the Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences the following Nursing courses will satisfy a Science option requirement: 63-241, 63-245, 63-351, and 63-391.

        PROFESSIONAL
        Business Administration
        Education
        Engineering
        Kinesiology
        Law
        Nursing

        MINOR
        A minor is not required but is available in most subject areas. See the individual program sections for availability of a minor in a specific discipline. A minor normally requires the completion of six courses as specified by the regulations of individual programs, and a minimum average of 60% in all minor courses.* Courses completed to fulfill the major requirements cannot be counted toward a minor, but courses completed for other and option requirements under the major degree can be used to fulfill the minor requirements. [Courses offered by the Faculty of Engineering constitute major requirements for engineering students.] Courses counted toward a minor cannot be counted toward a second minor.

        *Exception: The minor in Chemistry and Biochemistry requires an overall average of 67% or higher in all six courses with no individual course having a mark lower than a 60%.

        Minors are included on the student's official transcript but do not appear on the diploma parchment.

        PROGRAM TRANSFERS
        A student who wishes to transfer to a new program may apply on the web on the Student Self Service page at https://my.uwindsor.ca. All program transfers and conditions for transfer are subject to the approval of the Dean in accordance with regulations established by the Faculty into which the student wishes to transfer.

        1) Normally a student who has a cumulative average of 60% or greater in the previous program, and who meets the admission requirements of the intended program will be permitted to transfer and credit will be granted for all courses completed that apply to the intended program.

        2) If a student has been required to withdraw from a program, the student normally will be considered for admission to the new intended program on the same basis as students who have been required to withdraw from the program.

        3) All courses that are transferable, whether passed or failed, will be considered in calculating both the cumulative and major averages (where appropriate) in the new program.

        4) Applications for transfer to Business are subject to the following deadlines:
          • June 15th for Fall semesters
          • October 15th for Winter semesters
          • February 15th for Inter/Summer semesters
        Transfer is based on academic achievement and the availability of space, and a minimum 67% cumulative average is required in order to be considered for a transfer to Business.

        COMBINED MAJOR

        Students wishing to combine two areas of study from the Arts, Languages, Social Sciences, or Science within a single four-year Honours B.A. or B.Sc. program may do so if the areas of study concerned have provided for this possibility in their respective sections of the Calendar. Such programs require a total of forty courses including the successful completion of the major requirements and specified other requirements as defined by each area of study in the appropriate section of the calendar. The area of study selected as the first major will determine the degree awarded. (e.g., BA in English and Chemistry, or BSc in Chemistry and English).

        SENIOR-LEVEL COURSE REQUIREMENTS

        Three-year degree programs require a minimum of sixteen courses at or above the 200 level. All four-year programs require a minimum of twenty-six courses at or above the 200 level. Consequently, no student will be able to count more than fourteen 100-level courses towards a degree.

        STANDING REQUIRED FOR CONTINUATION IN PROGRAMS

        1a. The requirements for continuation "in good standing" are as follows, unless otherwise specified in the program section of the calendar:

        Standing Required for Continuation in ProgramsCumulative Average RequirementMajor Average Requirement
        All General and Honours BA., BSc degree programs [except for the Concurrent BA French Studies (honours)/BEd, the Combined Honours BA in Journalism, the BSc Honours Chemistry with Thesis, the BSc Honours Chemistry with Physics and Thesis, and the BSc Honours Biochemistry with Thesis]

        Honour Bachelor of Environmental Studies (BES)
        BCS (General and Honours)
        BMath (General)
        BComm(Honours Business Administration)
        BComm (Honours Business Administration and Economics)
        Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BScN)
        Bachelor of Forensic Science (BFS)
        BSc General (the required science courses are used to calculate the major average calculation)
        Post-Graduate Certificate in Accounting
        60%60%
        Honours Computer Science programs with Co-op60%65%
        Honours Physics programs with Co-op65%65%
        Combined BA Honours in Digital Journalism
        BComm. (Honours Business Administration and Computer Science)
        Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA)
        Bachelor of Music Therapy (BMT) (Admissions to program suspended as of Fall 2012)
        Bachelor of Music (BMus)
        Bachelor of Social Work (BSW)
        BMath (Honours)
        Concurrent BA in French Studies (Honours)/BEd (BA component)
        Concurrent BCS (Honours)/BEd programs (teachable areas)
        Concurrent BSc (Honours)/BEd programs (teachable areas)
        Concurrent BMath (Honours)/BEd program (teachable areas)
        60%70%
        Honours BComm programs with Co-op65%70%
        Bachelor of Applied Science (BASc) (including Co-op)
        Bachelor of Human Kinetics (BHK) (including (Co-op)
        Bachelor of Engineering Technology (BEngTech)

        All Certificate programs [except for the Second Language Education certificate, the Law and Politics Certificate program, and the Post-Graduate Certificate in Accounting]
        60%N/A
        Bachelor of Arts and Science (BAS)
        BSc Honours Chemistry with Thesis
        BSc Honours Chemistry with Physics and Thesis
        BSc Honours Biochemistry with Thesis
        70%70%
        Co-operative Education programs [with the exceptions of those listed elsewhere].70%65%
        Second Language Education Certificate
        Law and Politics Certificate
        70%N/A

        1b. Academic Standing Status and Progression Requirements

        CUMULATIVE AVERAGE REQUIREMENTS
        Cumulative average requirement of 60%
        Cumulative average requirement of 65%
        Cumulative average requirement of 70%
        In Good Academic Standing≥ 60%≥ 65%≥ 70%
        On Academic Probation55%-59.9%
        Required to Withdraw from the program< 55%< 65%< 70%
        For First-Year Students OnlyAn appropriate Academic Standing Committee will review the student’s academic record to determine whether to allow the student to continue on academic probation or whether to require the student to withdraw if:
        50%-54.9%

        Automatically required to withdraw from the program if < 50%
        60%-64.9%

        Automatically required to withdraw from the program if < 60%
        65%-69.9%

        Automatically required to withdraw from the program if < 65%
        For all students on academic probation By the subsequent evaluation period, the student may be required to withdraw from the program if the student’s average is not raised to at least:
        ≥ 60%≥ 65%≥ 70%

        Legend:
        “>” means greater than
        “<” means less than
        “≥” means greater or equal to


        MAJOR AVERAGE REQUIREMENTS
        Major average requirement of 60%
        Major average requirement of 65%
        Major average requirement of 70%
        In Good Academic Standing≥ 60%≥ 65%≥ 70%
        On Academic Probation55%-59.9%
        Required to Withdraw from the program< 55%< 65%< 70%
        For First-Year Students OnlyAn appropriate Academic Standing Committee will review the student’s academic record to determine whether to allow the student to continue on academic probation or whether to require the student to withdraw if:
        50%-54.9%

        Automatically required to withdraw from the program if < 50%
        65%-69.9%

        Automatically required to withdraw from the program if < 65%
        For all students on academic probation By the subsequent evaluation period, the student may be required to withdraw from the program if the student’s average is not raised to at least:
        ≥ 60%≥ 65%≥ 70%

        Legend:
        “>” means greater than
        “<” means less than
        “≥” means greater or equal to


        2) An appropriate Academic Standing Committee within each Faculty reviews the academic record of each student and makes academic decisions as appropriate in light of the cumulative and major averages achieved. In most programs this evaluation occurs at the conclusion of the Winter term. In certain programs (such as Co-operative Education programs, all Odette School of Business programs, Engineering, Nursing and Kinesiology), this evaluation may occur at the conclusion of any term, depending upon the structure of the program.

        3) A student will automatically be placed on probation if he/she has not met the minimum cumulative and major average requirements at the end of any term in which his/her record is not being formally reviewed,

        4) A student's record will be referred to an appropriate Academic Standing Committee within the Faculty for decision if he/she has not met the minimum cumulative or major average, in accordance with 1a an 1b above, at the end of the term when the record is being reviewed.

        5) Notification of the requirement to withdraw is included on the transcript, accessible via the web (https://my.uwindsor.ca) Students who have been required to withdraw may appeal. The appeal must be in writing to the Office of the Dean of the Faculty and must be submitted with any supporting documentation within six weeks of the web release of postings by the Office of the Registrar. Appeals are considered by the Academic Standing Appeals Committee; only circumstances of an extraordinary nature will result in rescinding the requirement to withdraw. Students should contact the appropriate Office of the Dean, or the Director of Inter-Faculty Programs, for information concerning appeals procedures.

        6) A student who has been required to withdraw may not register in the program from which he or she has been required to withdraw for twelve months.

        The student must apply for re-admission online at https://my.uwindsor.ca by the appropriate deadline date for the term desired and must include a statement of rationale, and documentation of academic success elsewhere.

        Re-admission to a program is not automatic and will be dependent upon an assessment of the applicant's prospects for successful completion of the program.

        If re-admitted, the student will be placed on probation and must raise the cumulative and major averages in accordance with above regulations (1a and 1b) by the next evaluation period and must satisfy any additional conditions of readmission which may have been imposed. If the student fails to meet such requirements, he or she normally will be required to withdraw.

        Former students who have not been enrolled at the University of Windsor for three or more consecutive years and are seeking readmission to first entry undergraduate programs should refer to the New Beginning Policy (Senate Policy N1 at www.uwindsor.ca/senate).

        A student who has been required to withdraw a second time will not be eligible for re-admission to the program.

        STANDING REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION

        In order to graduate a student must obtain minimum averages as follows:


        Standing Required for Graduation in Program Cumulative Average RequirementMajor Average Requirement
        All General BA, BSc, BCS, and BMath degree programs [For the BSc General, the required science courses are used to calculate the major average calculation]

        Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BScN)

        Post-Graduate Certificate in Accounting
        60%60%
        All Honours BA and Honours BSc degree programs, unless otherwise specified.

        Honour Bachelor of Environmental Studies (BES)
        Honours Bachelor of Computer Science (BCS) (with/without Co-op)
        Combined BA Honours in Digital Journalism (also requires an e-portfolio completed to satisfaction of advisory panel)
        Bachelor of Forensic Science (BFS)
        BComm (Honours Business Administration)
        BComm. (Honours Business Administration and Economics)
        BComm (Honours Business Administration and Computer Science)
        Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA)
        Bachelor of Music Therapy (BMT) (Admissions to program suspended as of Fall 2012)
        Bachelor of Music (BMus)
        Bachelor of Social Work
        Bachelor of Mathematics (BMath Honours)
        Concurrent BA in French Studies (Honours)/BEd
        Concurrent BCS (Honours)/BEd programs
        Concurrent BSc (Honours)/BEd programs
        Concurrent BMath (Honours)/BEd program
        60%70%
        Bachelor of Applied Science (BASc) (including Co-op)
        Bachelor of Human Kinetics (BHK) (including Co-op)
        Bachelor of Engineering Technology (BEngTech)
        All Certificate programs [except for the Second Language Education certificate, the Law and Politics Certificate program, and the Post-Graduate Certificate in Accounting]
        60%N/A
        Honours BComm programs with Co-op
        Honours Physics programs with Co-op
        65%70%
        Bachelor of Arts and Science (BAS)
        BSc Honours Chemistry with Thesis
        BSc Honours Chemistry with Physics and Thesis
        BSc Honours Biochemistry with Thesis
        70%70%
        Second Language Education Certificate
        Law and Politics Certificate
        70%N/A

        Students completing an Honours BA, Honours B.F.S., Honours BSc, or Honours BComm degree with a cumulative average of at least 60% and a major average of at least 60% but less than 70% will be awarded the four-year Major degree.

        GRADUATING "WITH DISTINCTION"/"WITH GREAT DISTINCTION"


        INTRODUCTORY STATISTICS COURSES

        Credit may not be given for more than one introductory statistics course, regardless of from which Faculty they are taken. Students in Arts and Social Science will normally take the General Faculty course 02-250. Students in Business will normally take 73-102 and students in Science will normally take 65-205.


        POLICY ON UNACCEPTABLE USE OF COMPUTER RESOURCES

        Clients within the University community using computing resources are entitled to the basic human rights of privacy and academic freedom. This privacy and academic freedom extends from the security on individual computer accounts and files, to the non-interference in legitimate computer use for University activities.

        The holder of a computer user ID and password will protect the campus computing facilities from unauthorized access by keeping his/her password confidential and by changing it regularly.

        Notwithstanding the foregoing principle on individual privacy and academic freedom, certain uses of computing resources are unacceptable. In any case, the campus network services are subject to the acceptable-use guidelines established by regional and national networks (e.g.,ONet and the Internet); the applicable guidelines are available from Information Technology Services.

        In general, six major areas of unacceptable use are identified:
        (a)Uses that violate federal or provincial laws, or University bylaws and policies such as those concerning information confidentiality.
        (b)Any uses that unduly interfere with the work of others or with the work of host systems. This includes, but is not limited to the unauthorized use of a computer user ID or password; the seeking of information about, or the attempt to modify the University's computer security system; and the knowing propagation of computer viruses or electronic chain letters.
        (c)Unauthorized copying of proprietary software, publications, or files.
        (d)Uses of commercial software that in any way violates the applicable licensing agreement.
        (e)Uses related to commercial activities including, but not limited to the distribution of advertising material, the offering of network information and services for sale or personal gain, or to private enterprises.
        (f)Computer information that portrays either men or women or their body parts in a pornographic or derogatory manner.

        A confirmed incident of unacceptable use will result in a sanction ranging from a verbal warning, to revocation of computing privileges, to expulsion, and to criminal prosecution.