Linda Urquhart
Retired


1. Jean Baptist Reame-1. He was born on 30 Oct 1615 in Notre Dame De Cogne, Eure-et-Loir, Larochelle, Aunis, France[1]. He died on 30 Oct 1704 in Cogne, Larochelle, Quebec, CA[1]. Burial in Sainte-Marguerite, La Rochelle, Department de la Charente-Maritime, Poitou-Charentes, France
2.
i.Rene Reame. He was born on 01 Jan 1642 in Aytre (St. Etienne)
Charente-Maritime, Notre-Dame de Cogne, Bishopic de LaRochelle, France[4, 5].
Baptism (LDS) on 01 Feb 1642 in Aytre (St-Etienne), LaRochelle,
Charente-Maritime, France[5]. He married Marie Chevreau. They were married on
29 Oct 1665 in Notre Dame, Quebec City, Quebec[4, 6, 7]. He died on 30 Oct 1722
in Hotel Dieu, Quebec City, Quebec[4]. He was also known as Rheaume. Burial in
Quebec City Catholic Cemetery, Quebec, Caanada[8].

2. Rene Reame-2 (Jean Baptist Reame-1). He was born on 01 Jan 1642 in Aytre (St. Etienne) Charente-Maritime, Notre-Dame de Cogne, Bishopic de LaRochelle, France[4, 5]. Baptism (LDS) on 01 Feb 1642 in Aytre (St-Etienne), LaRochelle, Charente-Maritime, France[5]. He died on 30 Oct 1722 in Hotel Dieu, Quebec City, Quebec[4]. He was also known as Rheaume. Burial in Quebec City Catholic Cemetery, Quebec, Caanada[8].


IT IS IN SILLERY, ON OCTOBER 29, 1665, BEFORE P. HENRI NOUVEL, S.J., THAT RENE REAUME MARRIED MARIE CHEVREAU, DAUGHTER OF THE LATE FRANCOIS CHEVREAU AND TOINETTE JALLEE, FROM THE CITY OF CHATEAUDRUN, PARISH OF ST. VALERIEN, DIOCESE OF CHARTRES. RENE REAUME, SON OF JEAN REAUME AND MARIE CHEVALIER, PARISH OF ST. MARGUERITE OR NOTRE DAME DE COGNE, WEDDED THIS DAY TO AN ORPHAN. ATTENDANTS AT THE CEREMONY WERE MR. LE MARQUIS DE TRACY, MR. DE COURCELLES, AND APPRENTICE TALON.

A FEW WEEKS BEFORE, ON THE 9TH OF OCTOBER, IN QUEBEC, THE NOTARY PIERRE DUQUET DREW UP THEIR CONTRACT OF MARRIAGE. STIPULATING THAT THE FUTURE COUPLE ENTER INTO MARRIAGE ACCOUNTING FOR GOODS AND DEBTS ONE OR THE OTHER MAY HAVE HAD BEFORE THE MARRIAGE. THE ORPHAN MARIE CHEVREAU BROUGHT GOODS AMOUNTING 200 POUNDS.

RENE HAD HIS HOUSE IN QUEBEC LOCATED BETWEEN THE JESUITS AND THE URSULINE SISTERS WHERE HE LIVED. ACCORDING TO ABBOT ANSELME RHEAUME, IF HE WAS MARRIED AT SILLERY, IT WAS BECAUSE HE WAS FRIENDS WITH THE JESUITS, AND HE HAD FRIENDS THERE.

RENE REAUME KNEW WELL HIS TRADE, THAT OF MASTER CARPENTER; AND HE WAS MUCH IN DEMAND FOR MORE THAN 30 YEARS. MANY CONTRACTS FOUND WERE TESTIMONY TO THE FACT THAT HE WAS VERY ACTIVE IN QUEBEC AND IN SURROUNDING AREAS ESPECIALLY DURING THE YEARS 1682 AND 1683.

MARIE CHEVREAU AND RENE REAUME, IT SEEMS, LIVED IN PETITE RIVIERE ALONG THE RIVER ST. CHARLES FOR ABOUT 15 YEARS. IN 1681, THEY HAD 8 CHILDREN, 10 CULTURED ACRES, 1 COW, AND 1 GUN. AROUND 1683, THEY MOVED TO THE TOWN OF ST. BERNARD, CHARLESBOURG.

MARIE AND RENE IN ALL HAD 13 CHILDREN, 11 BOYS AND 2 GIRLS. HIS LAST 17 YEARS WERE SPENT IN PEACE AND CALM IN CHARLESBOURG. HE WAS HOSPITALIZED AT L'HOTEL-DIEU OF QUEBEC ON AUGUST 16, 1722. AFTER HE RECEIVED THE LAST RITES OF THE CATHOLIC CHURCH, HE DIED ON OCTOBER 30, AT THE AGE OF 79 YEARS. HE WAS BURIED THE NEXT DAY IN CHARLESBOURG.

WE FIND PEOPLE OF ALL WALKS OF LIFE IN HIS DESCENDANTS. IN WINDSOR, ONT., THERE WAS A JOSEPH RHEAUME WHO WAS THE FIRST FRENCH CANADIAN TO RECEIVE A POST OF MINISTER IN THE GOVERNMENT OF THAT PROVINCE. LOUIS RHEAUME, OMI, NATIVE OF LEVIS, WAS RECTOR OF HAILEYBURY IN 1923. ALFRED RHEAUME, BORN IN ST. ROCH OF QUEBEC, IN 1863, WAS DIRECTOR OF THE ANNALS OF STE ANNE DE BEAUPRE FOR 2 YEARS. BROTHER JOSEPH RHEAUME, OFM AND ABBOT ANSELME RHEAUME COMPILED ALL THE INFORMATION FOR THE GENEALOGIC STUDY.


ONE MORE PIECE OF INFORMATION FOUND ELSEWHERE, RENE FATHERED A CHILD OUT OF WEDLOCK. A BOY NAMED JACQUES GAUTHIER, BORN JULY 26, 1669, SON OF RENE AND RENEE LA BASTILLE WHO WAS THE WIFE OF RENE GAUTHIER. THE CHILD WAS BORN AND BAPTIZED IN QUEBEC.

Diane Sheppard <https://www.facebook.com/diane.sheppard.75?fref=ufi> As a follow-up to the issue of the members of the Réaume family who were voyageurs, following is the entry for Marie Chevreau, their mother, in FCHSM’s series on the Filles du Roi. In addition to coverage of their marriages, our series also discusses those Filles du Roi who husbands or children were involved in the fur trade:

Marie Chevreau, daughter of François Chevreau and Antoinette Jalée or Talu, married René Réaume, son of Jean Réaume and Marie Chevalier, 29 October 1665 in Québec. In 1669 René Réaume fathered a son Jacques by Renée LaBasville, wife of René Gauthier. Five sons of Marie Chevreau and René Réaume were involved in the fur trade. Due to the extent of their careers, details are only provided for their activities prior to 1711; the remainder of their careers is covered in summary fashion. Robert Réaume was a voyageur from 1693 to 1702 and an engageur from 1717 to 1725. On 2 May 1693, Pierre d'Ailleboust, acting for Jacques Petit de Verneuil, hired Robert Réaume for a voyage to the 8ta8ois (Ottawa Indians). When Réaume arrived in the Ottawa country, he was to retrieve the deceased Zacharie Jolliet’s furs, belongings, and papers. On 13 June 1695, Augustin Legardeur de Courtemanche and Jean Baptiste Bissot de Vincennes hired Robert Réaume for a voyage to the 8ta8ois (Ottawa Indians). Although the summary of this contract states that Réaume had been hired to make a voyage to the Ottawa, considering that Legardeur had been named commandant of Fort St. Joseph it is more likely that the voyage involved a voyage to Fort St. Joseph. On 5 September 1701, Messire Jean Bochart de Champigny, intendant of New France, hired Joseph Trottier dit DesRuisseaux, Robert Réaume, and Toussaint Pothier to make a voyage to Détroit and to transport Thérèse Guyon and Marie Anne Picoté de Belestre and the younger Cadillac and Tonty children to Détroit. He wintered over and was paid 400 livres in wages. On 16 July 1702, the Compagnie de la Colonie hired Robert Réaume of Lachine to make a voyage to Détroit. He was paid 200 livres for the round trip journey. Simon Réaume also began his career as a voyageur, but within three years, he was an engageur, a career he followed until his death prior to 27 September 1734. On 13 April 1690, Louis Laporte de Louvigny hired Simon Réaume probably for a voyage to Michilimackinac where Laporte de Louvigny was commandant. On 2 May 1693 Pierre d'Ailleboust and Simon Réaume hired Étienne Villedonné/Villeneuve and Charles Dazé for a voyage to the 8ta8ois (Ottawa Indians). Jean Baptiste Réaume was a voyageur in the 17th century. On 19 June 1699, Jean Baptiste Réaume testified that the previous year he had been one of a number of voyageurs who had brought news to Alphonse Tonty at Michilimackinac. All of the men were promised that they would be given a permit for 1699 that would permit the men to retrieve their belongings at Michilimackinac. That same day he transferred or sold the congé to Robert Réaume. Jean Baptiste worked as an interpreter in present-day Green Bay Wisconsin, after the posts were re-opened. While Jean Baptiste was at Green Bay, he married Symphorose Ouaouagoukoué, a Native American. He remained at Green Bay until 1728 when the post was destroyed because of the Fox War. He served as interpreter at Fort St. Joseph, near present-day Niles, Michigan, in 1729 and then returned to Green Bay about 1731 after the post was re-opened. On 30 April 1705, the Directors of the Compagnie de la Colonie de Canada hired François Morneau and Edmond Levesque, of Ste-Anne de Batiscan, Jacques Forcier, of St-François, Jacques Réaume, of the coast of Beaupré, to make a voyage to Détroit. On 25 September 1710, Charles Renaud sieur Dubuisson, commandant of Fort Pontchartrain du Détroit in the absence of François Daupin, sieur de LaForest, hired Joseph Desrosiers dit Dutremble, of Champlain, Joseph Delaunay, of Québec, Jean Baptiste Pany, and Pierre Réaume, of Québec, to make a voyage to Détroit. On 28 September 1710, Jacques Filiatrault, of Lachine, François Rose, of Montréal, Charles Réaume, of Québec, and Pierre Saint-Yves, of Montréal, declared to Étienne Veron de Grandmesnil, acting for Antoine de Lamothe Cadillac, that they would transport merchandise to Détroit for Cadillac. On 2 October 1710, Antoine de Lamothe Cadillac hired Jacques Filiatrault, of Lachine, François Rose, of Montréal, Charles Réaume, of Québec, and Pierre Saint-Yves, of Montréal, to make a voyage to Détroit [Gagné, pp. 148-149; Jetté, pp. 970, 971; RAPQ1930, pp. 200-201; Timothy J. Kent, Rendezvous at the Straits Fur Trade and Military Activities at Fort de Buade and Fort Michilimackinac, 1669-1781 (Ossineke, Michigan: Silver Fox Enterprises, 2004), pp. 126-127 - 1693 contract; 128 - 1699, 160 - 1699; Timothy J. Kent, Ft. Pontchartrain at Detroit: A Guide to the Daily Lives of Fur Trade and Military Personnel, Settlers, and Missionaries at French Posts (Silver Fox Enterprises, 2001), pp. 1022-1023 - 1701, 1026 - 1702; Claude Maugue and Antoine Roy (editor), Inventaire des Greffes des Notaires du Régime Français (Québec: 1947), Volume 9 (IX), p. 242 - 1695; Dunning Idle, The Fort of the St. Joseph River During the French Régime 1679-1761 (South Bend, Indiana: Support the Fort, Inc., 2003), pp. 88-90; University of Toronto and Université Laval, Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online, (<http://www.biographi.ca/index-e.html>), biography of Legardeur;; Gilles Rageot and Antoine Roy (editor), Inventaire des Greffes des Notaires du Régime Français (Québec: 1943), Volume (IV) 4, p. 218 - 1690; Louis Chamballon and Antoine Roy, editor, Inventaire des Greffes des Notaires du Régime Français (Québec: 1960), Volume 19 (XIX), p. 138 - 1705; MNR, Vol. 2, pp. 593-595 - 1710; 395-597 - 1710].




Marie Chevreau is the daughter of Francois Chevreau and Antoinette Jalee. She was born 1652 in St. Valerian, Chartres, Beauce, France[1, 4]. She died on 27 Feb 1724 in Chateau Richer, Quebec, CA[1, 4]. Burial in La Visitation de Notre-Dame de Chateau-Richer Cemetiere, Chateau-Richer, Quebec, Canada[9].

Notes for Marie Chevreau: General Notes: The King's Daughters

compiled by the Societe des Filles du Roi et soldats du Carignam, Inc

The filles du roi, or King's Daughters, were some 770 women who arrived in the colony of New France (Canada) between 1663 and 1673, under the financial sponsorship of King Louis XIV of France. Most were single French women and many were orphans. Their transportation to Canada and settlement in the colony were paid for by the King. Some were given a royal gift of a dowry of 50 livres for their marriage to one of the many unmarried male colonists in Canada. These gifts are reflected in some of the marriage contracts entered into by the filles du roi at the time of their first marriages.

The filles du roi were part of King Louis XIV's program to promote the settlement of his colony in Canada. Some 737 of these women married and the resultant population explosion gave rise to the success of the colony. Most of the millions of people of French Canadian descent today, both in Quebec and the rest of Canada and the USA (and beyond!), are descendants of one or more of these courageous women of the 17th century.
Chevreau, Marie, m. Réaume, René, Oct. 29, 1665


From Michigan’s Habitant Heritage (MHH), Vol. 35, #3, July 2014 :

Marie Chevreau, daughter of François Chevreau and Antoinette Jalée or Talu, married René Réaume, son of Jean Réaume and Marie Chevalier, 29 October 1665 in Québec. In 1669 René Réaume fathered a son Jacques by Renée LaBasville, wife of René Gauthier. Five sons of Marie Chevreau and René Réaume were involved in the fur trade.



Rene Reame and Marie Chevreau. They were married on 29 Oct 1665 in Notre Dame, Quebec City, Quebec[4, 6, 7]. They had 13 children.

3. i. Maurice Reaume. He was born on 06 Dec 1666 in St Valerien, Chartres, France. He married Marie-Francoise Vivier. They were married on 19 Apr 1689 in
4. ii. Robert Joseph Reaume. He was born on 26 Jan 1668 in Quebec City, Quebec, Canada[11, 4]. Baptism on 26 Jan 1696 in Notre Dame de Quebec City, Province of Quebec, New France[12]. He married Elizabeth Brunet dit Belhumeur. They were married on 22 Sep 1696 in Notre Dame de Montreal, Quebec[1, 4]. He died on 24 Mar 1744 in St. Vincent de Paul, Laval, Quebec, CA[1, 4, 13]. Burial in Cimetiere de Laval, Laval, Laval Region, Quebec, Canada[14].

5. iii. Simon Reaume. He was born on 09 Nov 1669 in Chateau-Richer, Quebec, CA[1]. He married Therese Catin. They were married on 19 Mar 1710 in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. He died 1734 in Canada[1].

6. v. Rene Reaume. He was born on 12 Oct 1673 in Charlesbourg, Quebec, CA[1]. He married Marie Guyon. They were married on 22 Nov 1694 in Chateau-Richer, Montmorency, Quebec, CA[1]. He died on 17 Jan 1768[1].

7. vi. Jean-Baptiste Reaume. He was born on 24 Sep 1675 in St Charles, Petite Riviere, Quebec, CA[1]. He married Symphorose Ouaouaboukoue. They were married Bet. 1710–1714 in St Ignace, Michilimackinac, MI, US. Occupation 1726 (associasted with Louis Ducharme and Charles Nolan del la Marque at the Post of Le Baye, New France (Green Bay, Wisconsin).)[15]. Residence on 17 Nov 1730 in Monsieur d'Auteuil de Monceaux writes their spy Sieur Jean Baptiste Reaume, interpreter, under command of Monsieur Lechevalier de Villiers has been spending the winter stirring up trouble between the Sacs, Kickapoos and the Mascoutens.[16]. He died Abt. 1747[1].

8. vii. Marie-Renee Reaume. She was born on 01 Jul 1677 in St Charles, Petite Riviere, Quebec, CA. She married Michel Renaud. They were married on 25 Nov 1698 in Charlesbourg, Quebec, CA. She died on 01 Jan 1733 in Charlesbourg, Quebec, CA[1].

9. x. Jacques Reaume. He was born on 22 Apr 1683 in St Bernard, Quebec, CA. He married Marguerite Proteau. They were married on 06 Jul 1707 in Chateau Richer, Quebec, CA[1]. He died on 21 Mar 1711 in Charlesbourg, Quebec, CA[1].


3. Maurice Reaume-3 (Rene Reame-2, Jean Baptist Reame-1). He was born on 06 Dec 1666 in St Valerien, Chartres, France. He died on 16 Jan 1709 in Charlesbourg, Quebec, CA[1, 10].

4. Robert Joseph Reaume-3 (Rene Reame-2, Jean Baptist Reame-1). He was born on 26 Jan 1668 in Quebec City, Quebec, Canada[11, 4]. Baptism on 26 Jan 1696 in Notre Dame de Quebec City, Province of Quebec, New France[12]. He died on 24 Mar 1744 in St. Vincent de Paul, Laval, Quebec, CA[1, 4, 13]. Burial in Cimetiere de Laval, Laval, Laval Region, Quebec, Canada[14].


Robert Reaume, who could not read or write, was a voyager. He, along with Joseph Trottier, received the contract to bring Mme. Cadillac to Detroit in 1702. We are also descended from Joseph Trottier's sister, Marie Marguerite. (Ann Mooney research)

From Suzanne Somerville in her artcle for a FCHSM meeting 0n 14 Apr 2014, Concessions in Early French Detroit:1730s and 1740s.

Robert Réaume had four arpents along the Riviere-des-Prairies by 20 arpents deep and in addition 4 arpents by 12 extending inland. On the waterside property he had a house, a barn, a stable, and 30 arpents in cultivation. On one side was Desnoyers and on the other Jean Monnet. Robert Réaume was buried 24 Mar 1744 at Saint-Vincent-de-Paul, just months before his daughter Judith's wedding. His wife Elizabeth Brunet dite Belhumeur was buried four years later, 20 Jul 1748.


On FindAGrave.com Robert Reaume and his wife Elisabeth Brunet are buried at the Cimetiere de Laval in Laval, Quebec, Canada

From Michigan’s Habitant Heritage (MHH), Vol. 35, #3, July 2014

Robert Réaume was a voyageur from 1693 to 1702 and an engageur from 1717 to 1725. On 2 May 1693, Pierre d'Ailleboust, acting for Jacques Petit de Verneuil, hired Robert Réaume for a voyage to the 8ta8ois (Ottawa Indians). When Réaume arrived in the Ottawa country, he was to retrieve the deceased Zacharie Jolliet’s furs, belongings, and papers. On 13 June 1695, Augustin Legardeur de Courtemanche and Jean Baptiste Bissot de Vincennes hired Robert Réaume for a voyage to the 8ta8ois (Ottawa Indians). Although the summary of this contract states that Réaume had been hired to make a voyage to the Ottawa, considering that Legardeur had been named commandant of Fort St. Joseph it is more likely that the voyage involved a voyage to Fort St. Joseph. On 5 September 1701, Messire Jean Bochart de Champigny, intendant of New France, hired Joseph Trottier dit DesRuisseaux, Robert Réaume, and Toussaint Pothier to make a voyage to Détroit and to transport Thérèse Guyon and Marie Anne Picoté de Belestre and the younger Cadillac and Tonty children to Détroit. He wintered over and was paid 400 livres in wages. On 16 July 1702, the Compagnie de la Colonie hired Robert Réaume of Lachine to make a voyage to Détroit. He was paid 200 livres for the round trip journey.

An excerpt from Phantoms of the French Fur Trade: Twenty Men Who Worked in the Trade Between 1618 and 1758. Volumes I, II, and III by Timothy J. Kent. ISBN: 978-0-9657230-7-7

Robert Réaume and his wife Élisabeth Brunet dite Belhumeur

Important voyageur-trader, and eventually a very prominent voyageur-merchant partnered with the first commandant of Ft. Michilimackinac. Worked at intervals in the upper Great Lakes region until he reached the venerable age of 51

Among the three experienced and trusted voyageur-trader-guides who had been hired to make this journey, Robert was the most senior member, in terms of age, number of years married, and number of children. Now 33 2/3 years old, he and Élisabeth had been married for almost five years (with their wedding anniversary coming up on September 22), and they were expecting their third child in about six months. Joseph Trottier, Sieur Desruisseaux, a resident of the Lachine parish, was about 33 years of age. He had been married for nineteen months, and he and his wife Françoise Cuillerier were awaiting the arrival of their second child in about five months. The third and by far the youngest of the three men, Toussaint Pothier dit Laverdure, also a resident of the Lachine parish, was 26 years old. Having been trained as a maker of edged tools, he was still single; he would eventually marry in December of 1703. During the previous summer of 1700, he had been hired to make a trip to the Ottawa Country. (The only other hirings that had been recorded by Montreal notaries that year had been two men in the employ of the Jesuits in the Ottawa Country and five men working for La Forest in the Illinois Country.) 63

When the two canoes departed from Lachine on September 10, 1701, they were paddled by Messieurs Réaume, Trottier, and Pothier, and the three soldiers Picoté, Laurret from the Company of Chaissaigne, and a third whose name has not yet been discovered. The two craft held Madame Cadillac and her one child, Madame Tonty and five to seven of her children, 200 pounds of tobacco encased in two calf skins, 300 pounds of lead encased in cloth bags, and a half-bushel of salt, in addition to the provisions and supplies which the party would consume during the journey. Other cargo items would be picked up where they had been been left behind as overflow lading by the June and August canoes which had been bound for Detroit. (Two canoes with a total of five paddlers had departed for the new fort with supplemental supplies in August, intending to make a round trip to the post and back before the winter freeze.) The first stop for cargo pickup would take place at Ft. Rolland, 1 3/4 miles east of the Réaume farm, followed by another pickup some twelve miles further west, at Bout de l'Île, near the western tip of Montreal Island.

The vessel with the Cadillac family members was propelled by young Pothier in the stern, Réaume in the bow, and the unidentified soldier in the milieu, while the canoe with the Tonty family members was powered by the voyageur Trottier, the soldier Laurret, and the officer Picoté. The two canoes had together been equipped with 10 paddles, 14 yards of Méslis linen sailcloth (fashioned into two sails), 10 pounds of line or cord (for towing lines), 2 oilcloths, and 8 tumplines, as well as 10 pounds of sealant gum, 4 small axes, 1 crooked knife, and 2 bundles of fishhook leaders for repairing the craft while en route. 64

Back in June and July, the main convoy had traveled to Detroit via the customary route to the west, along the Ottawa and Mattawa Rivers, Lake Nipissing, and the French River, after which it had traveled southward down the eastern shorelines of Georgian Bay and Lake Huron. However, since that time, the Great T reaty had been ratified by the Iroquois nations. Thus, the more southerly route, via the upper St. Lawrence River and Lakes Ontario and Erie, would be available to Robert and his colleagues, without any worry of attacks by Iroquois war parties along the way.

After ascending the upper St. Lawrence in thirteen days or less, the party reached Ft. Frontenac, at the eastern end of Lake Ontario, some time before September 23. There, they met two canoes which were returning from Ft. Pontchartrain to Montreal, carrying Lt. Chacornacle and Fr. François Vaillant de Gueslis, as well as the first reports by Captains Cadillac and Tonty. Continuing westward along the full length of the lake, the two family canoes reached the Niagara River at about the end of September, after some three weeks of total progress. Traveling with women and young children, the party may have proceeded more slowly than the usual rugged, cargo-transporting brigade, which only stopped to rest for a few hours each night.

When they arrived at the Niagara River, no post was occupied by the French there. The previous facility at that locale had been evacuated in 1688, and the next recorded French post there would not be erected until 1719. The Niagara River presented one of the greatest ordeals on the passageway to Detroit. This northward-flowing waterway, although it was only about thirty miles long, fell a full 385 feet, in a number of rapids and the tallest waterfall in all of North America. As they paddled up its lowest seven miles, the river offered only a gentle current, with the slope dropping a mere one foot per mile. But then, the water roared out of a 200-foot-tall limestone gorge, whose sheer front face had once been the site of the original Niagara Falls. Over the course of thousands of years, the flowing water had cut this sheer wall of the Niagara Escarpment back a total of seven miles, creating a deep gorge. In this gorge, the slope of the river dropped more than 100 feet, so that it was impossible to navigate it. At the upper end of the 7-mile-long gorge was the gigantic falls, where the water plunged 164 feet, creating clouds of spray with arching rainbows. Immediately above the astounding falls were the upper rapids, in which the water dropped another 51 feet of elevation in less than one mile.

The portage which confronted Robert and the rest of the party at this place commenced at the beginning of the gorge, at its north end. The path extended along the east side of the river, but one to two miles away from the watercourse itself, for seven miles. It ended at a place just above the upper rapids, some 2 1 /2 miles east of the massive waterfall. Along the way, the path included a steep climb over three hills which rose 400 feet in elevation, before the path leveled out on the plateau above the falls. (In later years, certain special voyageurs would sometimes have clauses inserted into their contracts, which guaranteed that they would be allowed to hike over this highly demanding portage without carrying any cargo.) After putting back in, the party paddled upstream for about fourteen miles around the east side of Grande Île, and then five miles more to the head of the Niagara River, to finally reach Lake Erie. 65

With this challenging portage behind them, the little party of two canoes traveled westward along the north shore of Lake Erie, which was some 250 miles long. Compared to Lake Ontario, which was deep and not so easily riled, this body of water was much shallower, only averaging 90 feet in depth. Thus, it could be easily and quickly whipped into stormy conditions with the sudden arrival of winds. After they had covered about one-third of the length of the lake, the party reached the well-known feature of Longue Pointe, which was still about 130 miles east of Detroit. As was customary, they landed at the base of the extremely long and slender point, intending to make the usual portage across it. Thirteen years earlier, during August of 1688, the French officer Lahontan had encountered this same projecting land feature, which was typically handled by hiking across its base, rather than by paddling the laborious detour of fifty miles around its eastward-pointing tip: “The 25th, we arriv'd at a long point of land which shoots out 14 or 15 leagues into the Lake. And the heat being excessive, we chose to transport our boats and baggage two hundred paces over-land, rather than coast about for thirty-five leagues [to round the point].” 66

However, after completing the portage, the Cadillac-Tonty party was not able to continue on their way. In fact, strong and persistent winds forced them to remain on shore at the base of Longue Pointe for a full nine days.




Elizabeth Brunet dit Belhumeur is the daughter of Antoine Belhumeur and Francoise Moisan. She was born on 23 Jul 1674 in Lachine (Montreal), Quebec, CA[4]. She died on 19 Jul 1748 in St-Vincent-de-Paul, Laval, Quebec, Canada[4]. She was also known as Belhumeur.

Robert Joseph Reaume and Elizabeth Brunet dit Belhumeur. They were married on 22 Sep 1696 in Notre Dame de Montreal, Quebec[1, 4]. They had 10 children.

v. Hyacinthe Reaume. He was born on 25 Mar 1704 in Lachine, Quebec, CA[19, 18]. He married Agathe Lacelle. They were married on 17 Nov 1727 in Montreal, Quebec, Canada[1, 18]. He died on 10 Jun 1774 in Detroit, Wayne County, Michigan, USA[18, 16].


vi. Jean-Baptiste Reaume. He was born on 10 Dec 1705 in Lachine, Quebec, CA[1]. He married Marie Baune Lafranchise. They were married on 05 Apr 1731 in Pointe-Claire, Ile de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, CA. He died on 09 Sep 1761 in Pointe Claire, Ile de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, CA[1].

vii. Judith Reaume. She was born on 06 Nov 1707 in Lachine, Quebec, CA[1]. She married Jacques Lalande. They were married on 17 Feb 1726 in Lachine, Quebec, CA[1]. She died on 29 Mar 1750 in Sault-Au-Recollet, Quebec, CA[1].

viii. Pierre Reaume. He was born on 03 Oct 1709 in Lachine, Quebec, CA[1]. He married Susanne Hubert dit Lacroix. They were married on 20 Jan 1738 in Assumption Church, South Detroit, New France[20]. He died on 18 Sep 1785 in Detroit, Wayne County, Michigan, USA[1, 21].


5. Simon Reaume-3 (Rene Reame-2, Jean Baptist Reame-1). He was born on 09 Nov 1669 in Chateau-Richer, Quebec, CA[1]. He died 1734 in Canada[1].


6. Rene Reaume-3 (Rene Reame-2, Jean Baptist Reame-1). He was born on 12 Oct 1673 in Charlesbourg, Quebec, CA[1]. He died on 17 Jan 1768[1].


7. 7. Jean-Baptiste Reaume-3 (Rene Reame-2, Jean Baptist Reame-1). He was born on 24 Sep 1675 in St Charles, Petite Riviere, Quebec, CA[1]. Occupation 1726 (associasted with Louis Ducharme and Charles Nolan del la Marque at the Post of Le Baye, New France (Green Bay, Wisconsin).)

[15]. Residence on 17 Nov 1730 in Monsieur d'Auteuil de Monceaux writes their spy Sieur Jean Baptiste Reaume, interpreter, under command of Monsieur Lechevalier de Villiers has been spending the winter stirring up trouble between the Sacs, Kickapoos and the Mascoutens.[16]. He died Abt. 1747[1].

Notes for Jean-Baptiste Reaume: General Notes:

From Michigan’s Habitant Heritage (MHH), Vol. 35, #3, July 2014

Jean Baptiste Réaume was a voyageur in the 17th century. On 19 June 1699, Jean Baptiste Réaume testified that the previous year he had been one of a number of voyageurs who had brought news to Alphonse Tonty at Michilimackinac. All of the men were promised that they would be given a permit for 1699 that would permit the men to retrieve their belongings at Michilimackinac. That same day he transferred or sold the congé to Robert Réaume. Jean Baptiste worked as an interpreter in present-day Green Bay Wisconsin, after the posts were re-opened. While Jean Baptiste was at Green Bay, he married Symphorose Ouaouagoukoué, a Native American. He remained at Green Bay until 1728 when the post was destroyed because of the Fox War. He served as interpreter at Fort St. Joseph, near present-day Niles, Michigan, in 1729 and then returned to Green Bay about 1731 after the post was re-opened.


Significance information has recently come to light about the

location of the 1730 Mesquakie fort besieged by the French and their Indian confederates. The fort was the scene of one of the most important battles in the colonial wars of New France. For more than one hundred years historians and archeologists have debated its location on the prairies of eastern Illinois. The new evidence includes an unpublished narrative of the siege, recovered in the spring of 1989 in Paris from the Archives Nationales. The account is that of Jean-Baptiste Reaume: interpreter, scout, and agent of French interests among the Nations of the River St. Joseph.


The document interpreted as the Reaume Narrative was located in the Inventaire Analytique, Colonies, B 75-189, F3 24-25-50-51-78, D2c 2-3, Canada 1680-1785, COL/06, Colonies F3, Vol. 24, Description et Historique Louisiane 1680-1755, Moreau St. Mery, Folio 196.

Dr. Carl Ekberg, Professor of History, Illinois State University, graciously provided the following translation.

Letter from Monsieur d'Auteuil de Monceaux, dated at Quebec 17 November 1730, concerning the destruction of the Foxes

For several years we had been working without success to destroy this audacious and rebellious tribe [nation]. Monsieur de Beauharnois, with wise and prudent orders, had ordered Sieur Jean-Baptiste Reaume, interpreter for the Indians along the St. Joseph River, under the command of Monsieur le Chevalier de Villiers, lieutenant in His Majesty's troops, to work either for peace or for war with the Foxes. He [i.e. Reaume] spent last winter trying to stir up trouble between them and their allies, the Sacs, the Kickapoos, and the Mascoutens. He had spies everywhere, and finally in May he learned from the Kickapoos and Mascoutens that the Foxes were intending to pass by the Rock in order to go with their families to the Iroquois, which was confirmed by an Illinois Indian. Thereupon, Monsieur de Chevalier de Villiers sent this news to Detroit, to Monsieur de Schaillons [Deschaillons] with the Miamis, to Monsieur de Noyelles with the Ouiatenons, and to Sieur Simon Reaume. Within 24 hours, Monsieur Deschaillons had a party of 350 men, composed of 35 French, some Hurons, some Ouiatenons, and some Potawatomis, commanded by two of his sons. Monsieur de Noyelle was at the head of some Frenchmen and 140 Miamis. Sieur Simon Reaume commanded 400 Ouiatenons and some Frenchmen. The army from Detroit was integrated with that of the Miamis. They all joined together and started out for the Rock. They learned that Monsieur de Villiers had fallen back with 350 men, not knowing how to find the Foxes nor even knowing the route of their march, releasing our warriors after having marched more than 100 leagues. This retreat caused the Foxes to send an envoy to the Illinois to ask for the right to pass through. In the council cabin an angry young man struck out at the envoy with a tomahawk and with a knife. This aggressor was put outside and the council continued. After this envoy retired to his village, five leagues from the Rock, and 5 days later, in order to get revenge he killed or had killed some Illinois. This blocked their passage to the Iroquois. On the road Monsieur de Villiers ran into a Potawatomi chief named Oukia, a sworn enemy of the Foxes, who had not been invited by his tribe to this war; full of resentment and courage he had a small party of 18 men. Passing close to Monsieur de Villiers, who asked to know the reason for their march, he responded that he was going to the Illinois and while on the way he wanted to smash the heads of the Foxes. Sieur Jean-Baptiste Reaume [with Villiers' party] was clever, telling him [Oukia] that it was necessary to get the Mascoutens and Kickapoos involved by reproaching them for forgetting their dead, that he wished to be the revenger of the blood that they had lost, and that he wanted to retrieve the bones of those of them that the Foxes had killed.

These [former] allies of the Foxes, seeing themselves shamed by a stranger, sang the war song and left with him [Oukia] with 150 men, along with 40 Potawatomis who had joined them. They went to seek out the Foxes 50 leagues southeast of the Rock, where they found them. They [the Foxes] made a retreat to a woods, for that region is only prairie as far as the eye can see. They [the allies] approached and gave battle from noon until evening.

Both sides lost 7 or 8 men and the Foxes had 30 wounded. But our poor General Oukia lost his life after having many times repulsed his enemy. Finally the two armies, very tired, separated. The Foxes fortified themselves in their woods and the allies in the prairie a half a league from each other. The Fox fort was of stakes a foot apart, crossed at the top, all joined together and filled in with earth between them as high up as the crossing. On the outside a ditch ran around on three sides with branches planted to hide it, with pathways of communication for the fort in the ditches and others that ran to the river. Their cabins were complete with joists covered with decking, commonly called straw mats. On top of this there were covered ways such that one could see only an earthwork [terrasse] that would cast a shadow in the fort.

The two enemies having many wounded and neither one daring to attack again proposed a truce. This was accepted and for reciprocal proof of their sincerity they exchanged presents and meat. But the allies profited from their confidence to send runners to ask for help to the St. Joseph River, where Monsieur de Villiers and Reaume had just arrived; also to the Miamis, the Ouiatenons, and the Illinois.


Immediately Baptiste Reaume, with the consent of Monsieur de Villiers, had the warsong performed in the villages of the Sacs. the Potawatomis, and the Miamis, who accepted the tomahawk to the number of 300 savage men. They left 4 days later, Monsieur de Villiers accompanied by two Frenchmen and placing his confidence in the conduct of Sieur Reaume, for nothing was more important than to have a man of experience and influence, as he [Reaume] exercises on the temper of his tribe, in order to persuade them to wage war on their relatives.

Monsieur de Noyelle, commandant with the Miamis, didn't lose a moment in assembling the Miamis, who marched with him to the number of 130, plus 4 Frenchmen.

Sieur Simon Reaume, 66 years of age, who for 4 years had led and maintained under orders from Beauharnois the Ouiatenons, also allies of the Foxes, chanted for war against these rebels, pressed his tribe so hard with his expressions that they dared not refuse his request. He stirred up with his influence and authority blood against blood, and relatives and friends that they were, he turned them into enemies. He marched at the head of 400 Ouiatenons and 28 frenchmen. These gentlemen each left from their own post, 100 leagues apart from one another. They strode off, animated by glory and zeal for the service and by the desire to vanquish; they lost not a moment in seeking out the shortest pathways to arrive for combat.

Monsieur Villiers and Simon Reaume arrived the first and Monsieur de Noyelle some time latter. Together they encircled the fort of the rebels. Monsieur de St. Ange leading 300 Illinois and 90 Frenchmen joined up with them. The Kickapoos, Mascoutens, and Sacs, who had always respected the Foxes, did the same thing, and all these groups together constituted a small army that besieged the enemy. As there were some Frenchmen there, prudence did not require forcing the issue with an assault since their [the Foxes'] defeat was certain and since hunger would make them perish. The besiegers opened the attack trench with axes and knives; they planted cavaliers under cover of gunfire. This siege lasted 18 days, during which time the besieged threw over their palisade more than 300 children in order to touch the hearts of the besiegers their allies, while calling out to them that since they hungered after their own flesh that all they had to do was eat of it and quench their thirst with the blood of their close relatives, although they were innocent of the fault that their fathers had committed. They received with open arms these children, but Sieurs Reaume, whose prudence was based on 40 years of experience, vigorously opposed doing this on grounds that it might be a prelude to a general pardon. They immediately ran throughout the camp reproaching them that they were not warriors since they dared to take some men, and that the orders of their father the governor was not to punish innocents but rather those who had broken the peace treaty by spreading the blood of all those who made up this army. As the commandants and Sieur Reaume perceived that the besieged and the besiegers were engaged in frequent conversations, they judged that it was necessary to keep up a continuous fire in order to destroy any plans that might have been carried out.


The Foxes, seeing a hopeless situation and dying absolutely of hunger, proposed to Sieur Baptiste Reaume that they would surrender themselves to all the tribes in return for their lives. But he did not agree, nor did his brother, foreseeing that they [Foxes] were capable of compromising those with whom they would live. It was decided by the commandants that no quarter would be given.


The night of the 18-19th [sic] was so dark with much thunder and rain that it was impossible to see. The besieged made a large fire inside of their fort. The Sieurs Reaume warned the commandants that they were going to flee but that it was not necessary to oppose this because in the melee the allies would fire upon the French as well as upon the Illinois, the later not being liked by the attacking tribes. Nor was it to be feared that the enemy could go very far; within 9 days the besiegers would be forced to do their duty.

At midnight the besieged left their fort. But the Sieurs Reaume made use of clever orders in saying to the Sacs, who were the most accused of being in league with the Foxes, that it was necessary for them to prove themselves to their father the governor and the entire army by taking prisoners that night. They did that at exactly the same time that the Sieurs Reaume told the tribes that only the Sacs knew how to take slaves. This motivated them to the extent that they took 300 during the night.


At day break they were pursued with so much vigor that those who were furthest away were stopped and killed 8 leagues from the fort. It was said that there were 500 killed, namely: 200 men and 300 women and children. Three hundred women and children were taken prisoner. The warriors followed customary practice. They exchanged the slaves as presents, included among which were 40 men who were burned. Those who lived reported to Sieur Baptiste Reaume that there were no more to take. This would give peace to the colony and would increase its commerce through possession of the lands that they [the Foxes] occupied and of those where our Indians dared not hunt for fear of these fearsome enemies.

Communications will soon be open for the Mississippi as well as for the Sioux settlements. The region around the [Green] Bay will be peaceful and an agreeable settlement will be made there. The settlers at Detroit and Lake Erie will cultivate their gardens in complete security. Finally, there is a general peace, which well merits that the authors [apparently the Reaume brothers] of it should be rewarded.




8. Marie-Renee Reaume-3 (Rene Reame-2, Jean Baptist Reame-1). She was born on 01 Jul 1677 in St Charles, Petite Riviere, Quebec, CA. She died on 01 Jan 1733 in Charlesbourg, Quebec, CA

9. Jacques Reaume-3 (Rene Reame-2, Jean Baptist Reame-1). He was born on 22 Apr 1683 in St Bernard, Quebec, CA. He died on 21 Mar 1711 in Charlesbourg, Quebec, CA[1].

10. Pierre Reaume-3 (Rene Reame-2, Jean Baptist Reame-1). He was born on 28 Jul 1691 in Charlesbourg, Quebec, CA[18]. He died on 11 Aug 1740 in Detroit, Wayne, Michigan, USA[1].



1 Ancestry.com, One World Tree (sm) (Provo, UT, USA: MyFamily.com, Inc., n.d.), www.ancestry.com.
2 Findagrave.com, created by Robert DeVowe 19 Dec 2013 Find a Grave Memorial # 121935271.

3 Findagrave.com, created by Robert DeVowe added Dec 19, 2013. Find A Grave Memorial # 121935332

4 Geneologie du Quebec et de L'Acadie, www.nosorigins.qc.ca.

5 Federation quebecois des societes de genealogie and the Federation francaise de genealogie, Fichier Origine, www.fichieroringine.com.

6 Federation quebecois des societes de genealogie and the Federation francaise de genealogie, Fichier Origine, www.fichieroringine.com, DGO, tome 1, p.93

7 Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967, In the year 1665 Oct 29 after the publication of three banns and having discovered no legitimate impediment, Father Henry Nounel, has married in the Chapel of Syllery Rene Reame, son of Jean Reame and Marie Chevalier of the parish of Notre Dame de Cogne Eur et Loir de La Rochelle in one part; and Marie Chevreau, daughter of Francois Chevreau and Thoinette Ialie de Chatteau of the parish of St Valerian ??? de Chartres of the other part.

8 Findagrave.com, created by Robert DeVowe record added Dec 19, 2013, Find A Grave memorial #121932771.
9 Findagrave.com, created by Robert DeVowe record added Dec 19, 2013; Find A Grave Memorial # 121935332.
10 Quebec, Geneological Dictionary of Canadian Families (Tanquay Collection) 1608-1890.

11 Lori Cartwright, Lamirande Family History.

12 Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967, The 26th day in the month of January in the year 68 was baptized by Father Henry de Berniere of this parish, Robert Reame, born the previous day, son of Rene Reame, and Marie Chevreau his wife. Godfather was Robert Mossion and the godmother Helene Bonneau, wife of Pierre des Moulins of this parish.

13 Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967, The year 1744, 24 March, has died in this parish......Robert Reaume age 85 years after having........(last rights)......was buried in a normal ceremony in the cemetery of this parish on the 25th.

14 Findagrave.com, created by Robert DeVowe, record added Dec 22, 2013, Find A Grave Memorial #122036956.

15 Metis Culture 1726-1728, http://www.agt.net/public/dgarneau/metis7.htm.

16 Metis Culture 1729-1732, http://www.agt.net/public/dgarneau/metis8.htm.

17 Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967, Godfasther Michel Chretien resident of Charlesbourg.

18 John Askin Papers.

19 Lajeunesse, Ernest J, The Windsor Border Region.

20 Ontario French Catholic Church Records (Drouin Collection) 1747-1967, Parish of Assumption, Sandwich, page 5. Reaume, Pierre son of Robert and Catherine Belhumeur married 20 jun 1738 to Susanne Lacroix daughter of Louis Hubert Lacrox and Magdalene Trottier.

21 Quebec, Genealogical Dictionary of Canadian Families (Tanguay Collection), 1608-1890, ancestry.ca.

22 Metis Culture 1741-1742, http://www.agt.net/public/dgarneau/metis11.htm.

23 Metis Culture 1754-1755, http://www.agt.net/public/dgarneau/metis16.htm.

24 Metis Culture 1750-1753, http://www.agt.net/public/dgarneau/metis15.htm.

25 St Anne's parish records, ancestry.com.


Note - many sources are missing on the FTM file but can be found on the family tree on ancestry.com